Mother Night (1996) - News Poster

(1996)

News

25 underrated political dramas

Rebecca Clough Jan 20, 2017

As America gets its new President, we look at some excellent political drama films that may have slipped under your radar...

Political dramas can be entertaining, informative and even educational, opening up debates and offering new points of view. (When experiencing a year of tumultuous change like the one we’ve just had, they can also be a comforting reminder that, no matter what your situation, it could always be worse...) With the full whack of corruption, war, and conspiracy, here are 25 political dramas which deserve to be better known.

See related 25 underrated political thrillers 17 new TV shows to watch in 2017 Taboo episode 3 review The Girl On The Train review 25. The Marchers/La Marche (2013)

When teenager Mohamed (Tewfik Jallab) is shot by police, his friends want revenge, but he has a better idea: peaceful protest. Marching from Marseille to Paris, they band together with quite an assortment of characters along the way.
See full article at Den of Geek »

‘Complete Unknown’ Review: Joshua Marston’s ‘Forgiveness Of Blood’ Follow-Up Has A Fatal Identity Crisis

‘Complete Unknown’ Review: Joshua Marston’s ‘Forgiveness Of Blood’ Follow-Up Has A Fatal Identity Crisis
“We are what we pretend to be so we must be careful what we pretend to be.” That lucite pearl of wisdom, which appears in the introduction of Kurt Vonnegut’s 1961 novel “Mother Night” and then reverberates beneath the rest of its pages, is as much of a warning as it is an invitation. Many of the great filmmakers have dedicated their lives to sifting through the truth of Vonnegut’s words — or at least that of the principle expressed therein — using that sentiment as a starting point from which to dive into the bottomless void of the human psyche.

Maria Full of Grace” director Joshua Marston, who has struggled to live up to the promise of that stirringly urgent debut, is not one of the great filmmakers. Identity is a construct, relationships are a performance and love is a fiction that only endures for as long as two people
See full article at Indiewire »

One Thing I Love Today: Was the second season of 'Fargo' the best movie of 2015?

  • Hitfix
One Thing I Love Today: Was the second season of 'Fargo' the best movie of 2015?
One Thing I Love Today is a daily column dedicated to putting a spotlight on some pop culture item worth your attention. After all, there's enough snark out there. Why not start every day with one quick shotgun blast of positivity? Noah Hawley is a True Believer. There is no reason whatsoever that a television show based on Fargo should work, but after finishing season two of the FX series, I am blown away by what he's accomplished and by the sheer force of his love for Joel and Ethan Coen. Homage and inspiration are similar, but not the exact same things. Homage is fine, but I think you can only go so far with it. Inspiration, though, is something else. Real inspiration is a springboard to something new, something that is genuinely yours. One person looks at something and sees and processes it a certain way, and someone else
See full article at Hitfix »

Killer Couture: The Supplementary Pleasures Of Criterion’S Dressed To Kill Discs

July 25, 1980. That was the day Dressed to Kill opened in theaters across the country, and it marked the first of countless times I would see the movie projected on a big screen, on a drive-in screen, panned and scanned for home video, even interrupted and cut to ribbons for network TV. But I’ll never forget seeing it that first time, in a cavernous old movie palace in downtown Eugene, Oregon, its lush, complex, violently dynamic and meticulously choreographed images, all set to a Pino Donaggio score which reflected precisely those same qualities, thrilling me to my core. I left that theater buzzing, even if at first I wasn’t entirely sure how I felt about the movie-- it took me a few days and another screening or two to decide that the outraged cries of Hitchcock plagiarism coming from some circles were unwarranted. For me, Dressed to Kill is
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Feature: HollywoodChicago.com 10 Best Interviews of 2013

Chicago – Every year, the movie stars, actor/actresses and filmmakers come knocking, and HollywoodChicago.com is there to answer. Film Critics Brian Tallerico and Patrick McDonald have combined their best-of interviews for 2013, and it’s an intriguing and eclectic mix.

With so many promotional tours, conventions and shows coming through Chicago, the opportunity to get a wide range of celebrities, filmmakers and up-and-comers is one of the privileges of covering TV and film here. The following interviews – enhanced (except for two interviews) by the photography of Joe Arce – were significant for their background stories, promotional circumstance and memorable quotes.

Sheryl Lee of “Twin Peaks

Sheryl Lee at Wizard World Chicago Comic Con

Photo credit: Joe Arce of Starstruck Foto for HollywoodChicago.com

Interviewer: Patrick McDonald

Opening Note: Before getting started, there are so many arresting interviews I participated in during 2013, and if you plug these names in the search engine,
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

John Goodman: A Force of Nature

John Goodman: A Force of Nature
Most of America first came to know John Goodman as the blue-collar patriarch of the Midwestern family on “Roseanne.”

Playing the role of big-hearted, hard-working contractor Dan Connor on the ABC sitcom for eight seasons could have typecast him as TV dad type for the rest of his days. But Goodman , whose hands and feet will be imprinted in cement at the Tcl Chinese courtyard on Nov. 14, is simply too prodigious a talent to be contained by one character, no matter how intimate the relationship he developed with millions of viewers.

He’s played congressmen (“The West Wing”) and crooks (“Raising Arizona”), murderers (“Damages”) and miscreants (“O Brother, Where Art Thou?”), cops (“Sea of Love”), bluesmen (“Blues Brothers 2000”), jazzmen (“Inside Llewyn Davis”), moviemen (“Argo”), military men (“Mother Night”) ball players (“The Babe,” a suicidal English professor (“Treme”) and without question the most distinctive hyper-aggressive bowler ever captured on screen
See full article at Variety - Film News »

John Goodman: A Force of Nature

John Goodman: A Force of Nature
Most of America first came to know John Goodman as the blue-collar patriarch of the Midwestern family on “Roseanne.”

Playing the role of big-hearted, hard-working contractor Dan Connor on the ABC sitcom for eight seasons could have typecast him as TV dad type for the rest of his days. But Goodman , whose hands and feet will be imprinted in cement at the Tcl Chinese courtyard on Nov. 14, is simply too prodigious a talent to be contained by one character, no matter how intimate the relationship he developed with millions of viewers.

He’s played congressmen (“The West Wing”) and crooks (“Raising Arizona”), murderers (“Damages”) and miscreants (“O Brother, Where Art Thou?”), cops (“Sea of Love”), bluesmen (“Blues Brothers 2000”), jazzmen (“Inside Llewyn Davis”), moviemen (“Argo”), military men (“Mother Night”) ball players (“The Babe,” a suicidal English professor (“Treme”) and without question the most distinctive hyper-aggressive bowler ever captured on screen
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Interviews: Back to ‘Twin Peaks’ with Sheryl Lee, Sherilyn Fenn?

Chicago – The hot rumor this week in the TV industry is that “Twin Peaks” show creators David Lynch and Mark Frost were talking up a revival of that unforgettable cult TV show of the early 1990s. Will Sheryl Lee (Laura Palmer) and Sherilyn Fenn (Audrey Horne) possibly participate?

Both actresses were at the Wizard World Chicago Comic Con last summer and talked to HollywoodChicago.com, and posed for the lens of photographer Joe Arce. The next Wizard World Chicago Comic Con will take place August 8th-11th, 2013, at the Donald E. Stephens Center in Rosemont, Illinois.

Sheryl Lee, Laura Palmer in “Twin Peaks,” “Backbeat

“She’s dead, wrapped in plastic” introduced the icon character Laura Palmer to the culture in the TV show “Twin Peaks” (1990-91). She was portrayed with unerring skill by Sheryl Lee, who also managed in the series to portray Laura’s twin cousin, Maddy Ferguson. She
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Ben Affleck, Alan Arkin, John Goodman and Bryan Cranston, to receive the “Hollywood Ensemble Acting Award” for “Argo” by Josh Abraham

HollywoodNews.com: The 16th Annual Hollywood Film Awards, presented by the Los Angeles Times, is pleased to announce that the feature "Argo," directed by Ben Affleck, will receive the "Hollywood Ensemble Acting Award." "We are very proud to recognize the ensemble cast of "Argo," for their dramatic and outstanding performances," said Carlos de Abreu, Founder and Executive Director of the Hollywood Film Awards. The 2012 Hollywood Film Awards has also announced that it will honor director David O. Russell with the "Hollywood Director Award"; Oscar-winning actor Robert De Niro with the "Hollywood Supporting Actor Award"; Academy Award-winning actress Marion Cotillard with the "Hollywood Actress Award"; three-time Academy Award-nominated actress Amy Adams with the "Hollywood Supporting Actress Award"; producers Tim Bevan and Eric Fellner with the "Hollywood Producers Award"; writer/director Judd Apatow with the "Hollywood Comedy Award"; actor John Hawkes with the "Hollywood Breakout Performance Award" for "The Sessions"; and Quvenzhané Wallis
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

Woody Allen: A Documentary – review

Although he recently directed the British film How to Lose Friends and Alienate People and earlier adapted Kurt Vonnegut's Mother Night for the screen, Robert Weide's speciality is documentaries about American comedians, and to it he returns in this engrossing movie. A shortened theatrical version of a two-part TV programme, it follows Woody Allen around New York as he and a vast cast of friends, colleagues and admiring observers review his life and work. The time span arches from his happy Brooklyn childhood as the much-loved son of lower-middle-class Jewish parents in the early 1940s to 2011, which found him recovering from a fallow period to make a critical and box-office comeback with his most profitable film to date, Midnight in Paris. Allen is in fine, funny, frank, self-disparaging form, there are fascinating revelations on every aspect of his life, well-chosen extracts from his films and TV interviews, and
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

A Midnight Clear

(Keith Gordon, 1992; Second Sight, 15)

This haunting small-scale war movie, given a very limited release 20 years ago and available for the first time on DVD and Blu-ray, is based on a widely praised novel by William Wharton, who was wounded serving in the Us infantry during the Battle of the Bulge in the winter of 1944-45, the setting for the film. An ironic, at times surreal fable about the madness of war, it centres on a six-man intelligence and reconnaissance squad dispatched by a reckless, vainglorious major (a mortician in civvy street) on a dangerous mission on the snowbound border of France, Belgium and Germany in the Ardennes, and how they become involved with an equally disillusioned Wehrmacht unit who want to negotiate a separate peace. The film's witty, intelligent narrator is Sergeant Will Knott (Ethan Hawke), and the plot's twists are matched by the sharpness of its moral insights.

The writer-director,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Keith Gordon Blogs From The Sundance Directors' Lab

It's June, so that means it's time for the Sundance Labs, where emerging writers, directors and composers hone their skills in preparation for their next films. This year, we'll be featuring a number of Lab participants blogging from the Sundance Institute, and to launch the series we're really happy to have actor and writer/director Keith Gordon (A Midnight Clear, Mother Night, Waking the Dead) conveying his experiences as an advisor to the Directing Fellows. In this first post, penned in the middle of his drive from L.A. to Utah, he writes about the reasons he goes back to Sundance year after year. Check back regularly this month for more reports. I’m writing this from a Comfort Inn motel in St. George Utah. This will be my ninth...
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Getting in the Act: 11 Novelists Who Found Their Way Into the Script

  • IFC
Rock stars want to be movie stars and movie stars want to be rock stars; models want to be designers and designers want to tooth-tug Keira Knightley's ear on the cover of Vanity Fair. These are known facts, demonstrable often to a shudder-inducing degree. What to make, though, of the latent career ambitions suggested by the humble novelist's propensity for cameos? Do they all want to be comedians? Professional winkers? Or just slightly richer?

From Saul Bellow playing the "Man in Hallway" in an adaptation of his novel "Seize the Day" 30 years after it had been first published to Michael Chabon taking abuse in a bookstore in the upcoming adaptation of his 1988 novel, "The Mysteries of Pittsburgh," many authors can't resist the idea of essentially walking into their own novel when put to celluloid. Below are a few of those, and a few more whose motivations are more elusive.
See full article at IFC »

See also

Showtimes | External Sites