Edit
Michael Collins (1996) Poster

Goofs

Anachronisms 

During the raid on Four Courts, over the shoulder of the leftmost soldier a 1980s-vintage bus can be seen.
5 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Michael Collins is shown wearing a wrist watch. These were developed specifically for World War I airplane fighter pilots. It is far more likely that Collins would have carried a pocket watch during the period the film covers.
5 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The car that de Valera gets into after arriving by boat has the registration 15 D 1, which indicates that although it is a 1915 car, it was imported and registered in Dublin as a historic vehicle sometime after 1987. An original Dublin registration of the time would be in the format IK 1234.
5 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
During the "Croke Park" scene in Bray, the DART lines are visible in the background.
4 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
One of the sailing vessels pictured in the background as Collins, Boland, and Kitty Kiernan walk along the pier in the Dun Laoghaire Harbour is a Dublin Bay Sailing Club Mermaid. This class of 3-man racing dinghy was designed in 1932, 9 years after Collins' death.
2 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

Character error 

Ned Broy provides to his new boss a picture of Michael Collins, but that same picture was taken from the same archive which Collins previously removed from his own file, a few scenes earlier.
1 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

Crew or equipment visible 

When Michael Collins returns from London after the negotiation, he rides a car with Harry Boland and the head of a woman can be seen through the back window. The woman walks at the same speed as the car and remains seen in the same corner of the window, even though the car is increasingly speeding throughout the shot.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

Errors in geography 

During the Easter Rising scenes, the Volunteers and Citizen Army are shown marching out of the General Post Office to surrender. However, the day before the surrender, they had retreated from the burning GPO to another building down the road, and surrendered from there. The white flag of surrender was actually displayed at 16 Moore Street, in another part of Dublin, where the leadership was residing.
6 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
When the cabinet are trying to convince Collins to engage in civil war Arthur Griffith says 'They have occupied the GPO, O'Connell Street, Limerick....'. O'Connell Street was only so named in 1924. In 1922 when this takes place it was still called Sackville Street.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

Factual errors 

Eamonn De Valera is shown surrendering with the General Post Office garrison after the Easter Rising. However, he was actually Commandant of the garrison at Bolland's Mills, which surrendered after the GPO upon receiving orders to stand down. He was never at the GPO during the Rising.
7 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
There is a speech de Valera makes to a crowd after the treaty with the UK government is signed. He states in his fiery speech that "only pure blood Irish" should be able to participate in the new Republic, but he would have not said this since his father and surname were Spanish, a fact which his political opponents would use against him.
6 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Joe O'Reilly was not with Collins in Beal na mBlath on 22 August 1922.
5 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Thomas MacDonagh surrendered at Jacob's Factory; he wasn't present with GPO leaders Pearse, Clarke or Connolly when they surrendered at 16 Moore Street.
5 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
In the Croke Park scene an armoured car opens fire on the crowd. In reality an armoured car was never used at Croke Park.
5 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Harry Boland was in America when Collins returned to Ireland with the treaty, not in Dublin as shown in the movie.
3 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
During the Easter Rising scenes, Collins is shown wearing the uniform of a full Lieutenant in the Irish Volunteers. While there is a photo of him in his Volunteers uniform as a Lieutenant, by the Easter Rising he had been promoted to Captain, where he served as aide de camp to Joseph Plunkett, who is conspicuously absent.
3 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
(at around 7 mins) We see Collins and Boland on a train, and it says May 1918. They are going to a rally for a by-election, we see the famous "Put him in to get him out" election posters from the 10 May 1917 by-election in South Longford where Joseph McGuinness was the SF candidate. The road sign says Longford, there were no by-elections in May 1918, and McGuinness was the only prisoner candidate in the 1917-18 by-elections. So it is clear that it should be May 1917 and not May 1918.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The film's introduction states that the United Kingdom was the foremost world power at the beginning of the 20th century. However this is not true as the UK was being surpassed economically and industrially by both Germany and the United States. In addition the Imperial German Navy had almost eclipsed the Royal Navy in size, threatening the UK's ability to hold onto its Empire.
1 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

Spoilers

The goof item below may give away important plot points.

Incorrectly regarded as goofs 

In the film, it shows Ned Broy (Stephen Rea), a double agent in Dublin Castle being tortured and murdered by the British. While Broy survived the Irish Civil War in real life, the Broy in the film is a composite of both Broy and Dick McKee. McKee was killed in Dublin Castle reputedly whilst attempting to escape custody after being captured before Bloody Sunday.
6 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

See also

Trivia | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

Contribute to This Page