IMDb > Message to Love: The Isle of Wight Festival (1997)
Message to Love: The Isle of Wight Festival
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Message to Love: The Isle of Wight Festival (1997) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

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7.4/10   429 votes »
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Release Date:
21 February 1997 (USA) See more »
Plot:
In August 1970 600,000 fans flocked to the Isle of Wight to witness the third and final festival to be held on the island... See more » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
1 win See more »
User Reviews:
Brilliant document of a turning point in rock history. See more (20 total) »

Cast

 

Ian Anderson ... Himself (Jethro Tull)

Joan Baez ... Herself
Martin Barre ... Himself (Lead guitarist, Jethro Tull)
John Bonham ... Himself
Clive Bunker ... Himself (Drummer, Jethro Tull)
Chick Churchill ... Himself (Ten Years After)

Leonard Cohen ... Himself
Billy Cox ... Himself (Jimi Hendrix's Bassist)

Roger Daltrey ... Himself (The Who)

Miles Davis ... Himself

John Densmore ... Himself (The Doors)

Donovan ... Himself
The Doors ... Themselves
Graeme Edge ... Himself (The Moody Blues)
Emerson Lake and Palmer ... Themselves
Keith Emerson ... Himself (Emerson, Lake and Palmer)

John Entwistle ... Himself (The Who)
Ricki Farr ... Himself - Master of Ceremonies
Andy Fraser ... Himself (Free)
Free ... Themselves
Rory Gallagher ... Himself (Lead guitarist, Taste)
Justin Hayward ... Himself (The Moody Blues)

Jimi Hendrix ... Himself (archive footage)

Jethro Tull ... Themselves
Simon Kirke ... Himself (Free)
Paul Kossoff ... Himself (Free)

Robby Krieger ... Himself (The Doors)

Kris Kristofferson ... Himself
Greg Lake ... Himself (Emerson, Lake and Palmer)
Alvin Lee ... Himself (Ten Years After)
Ric Lee ... Himself (Ten Years After)
John Lodge ... Himself (The Moody Blues)
Leo Lyons ... Himself (Ten Years After)

Ray Manzarek ... Himself (The Doors)
Richard McCracken ... Himself (Bass, Taste).
John Mitchell ... Himself (Jimi Hendrix's Drummer) (as Mitch Mitchell)

Joni Mitchell ... Herself
The Moody Blues ... Themselves

Keith Moon ... Himself (The Who)

Jim Morrison ... Himself (The Doors)
Carl Palmer ... Himself (Emerson, Lake and Palmer)
Michael Pinder ... Himself (The Moody Blues) (as Mike Pinder)

Paul Rodgers ... Himself (Free)

John Sebastian ... Himself
Taste ... Themselves
Ray Thomas ... Himself (The Moody Blues)

Tiny Tim ... Himself

Pete Townshend ... Himself (The Who)

The Who ... Themselves
John Wilson ... Himself (Drummer, Taste)
Ten Years After ... Themselves

Directed by
Murray Lerner 
 
Writing credits
(in alphabetical order)
Murray Lerner 

Produced by
Malcolm Gerrie .... executive producer: Initial
Geoff Kempin .... executive producer: Castle Communications
Murray Lerner .... producer
Avril MacRory .... executive producer: BBC
Rocky Oldham .... executive producer: Initial
 
Film Editing by
Greg Sheldon (performance sequences)
Stanley Warnow  (as Stan Warnow)
Einar Westerlund 
 
Production Management
Laurie Horsley .... post-production supervisor (as Lori Horsley)
 
Sound Department
Greg Bailey .... sound recordist
Margaret Crimmins .... supervising sound editor
Rick Dior .... sound re-recording mixer
Ron Geesin .... sound recordist
Gareth Haywood .... sound recordist
Paul Hsu .... assistant sound editor
Mike Lax .... sound recordist
Garth Marshall .... sound recordist
Mike McDuffie .... sound recordist
Colin Richards .... sound recordist
Ivan Sharrock .... sound recordist
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Richard Branczik .... assistant camera
Andy Carchrae .... camera operator
John Davey .... assistant camera
Jimmy Dibling .... assistant camera (as Jimmy Dibbling)
Julian Harvey .... assistant camera
Jack Hazan .... camera operator
Nicholas D. Knowland .... camera operator (as Nic Knowland)
Norman G. Langley .... camera operator (as Norman Langley)
Murray Lerner .... camera operator
John Metcalfe .... assistant camera
Peter Rowe .... assistant camera
Richard Stanley .... camera operator
Charles Stewart .... camera operator
Ivan Strasburg .... assistant camera (as Ivan Strasbourg)
Tic Ticnor .... assistant camera
John Wellard .... assistant camera (as John Welland)
Mike Whittaker .... camera operator
 
Editorial Department
Jennifer Cox .... apprentice editor
Benjamin Darling .... assistant editor
Nick Dibeneditto .... negative matcher (as Nick DiBeneditto)
Noah Lerner .... assistant editor
Anne McCabe .... assistant editor
Jay Tilin .... on-line editor
Vincent Villandi .... colorist
Jerome Wallin .... assistant editor (as Jerome M. Wallin)
 
Other crew
Bill Baldwin .... consultant: avid (as Billy Baldwin)
Cathy Carapella .... clearance: Diamond Time
Morton 'Tim' Fry .... legal affairs
Jeremy Gawade .... legal affairs
Robert H. Montgomery Jr. .... legal affairs
Judi O'Brian .... legal affairs
Alex Panagakis .... publicist
Judy Richter .... consultant: avid
Robert Rosenberg .... program associate
 
Thanks
Lucas Church .... special thanks
Alan Douglas .... special thanks
Andy Frain .... special thanks
Donal Gallagher .... special thanks
Judith Lerner .... special thanks
Alistair Norbury .... special thanks
Jenny Pollitt .... special thanks (as Jenny Pollit)
Mark Polyocan .... special thanks
Keith Robinson .... special thanks
Jeff Rosen .... special thanks
Daihei Shiohama .... special thanks
Andy Ward .... special thanks
 

Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
"Message of Love: The Isle of Wight Festival: The Movie" - USA (video title)
See more »
Runtime:
127 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Aspect Ratio:
1.66 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Filming Locations:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
This was the last major performance of Jimi Hendrix in England.See more »
Quotes:
Bert "The Agent:They claim that it isn't money that they're interested in. Nobody seems to be interested in money, the agents, the artists, you, me, so forth and so on. But to put one of these festivals on everybody's got to be paid. It couldn't be love, 'cause they love money.See more »
Soundtrack:
Let It BeSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
8 out of 9 people found the following review useful.
Brilliant document of a turning point in rock history., 3 January 2001
Author: Rick O from Cambridge, Mass.

This film was released only a few years ago, constructed from footage almost three decades old. One wonders why it had never seen the light of day before. "Message to Love" is an instant classic, a rock documentary that deserves to sit up on the same mantle as "Woodstock", "Monterrey Pop" and "Gimme Shelter". The Isle of Wight Festival in August of 1970 was the last of its kind, an event that was supposed to be an English Woodstock but descended into utter chaos as the Aquarian hippie ideal knocked heads with the emerging juggernaut of a corporate music industry ready to mass-market a "product" to the growing legions of rock fans. But despite the hypocrisy, mismanagement and unruly behavior that director Murray Lerner ("When We Were Kings") so keenly observes, he does not lose sight of the fact that a lot of great music went down during those five days. With an amazingly eclectic lineup that has Miles Davis and Tiny Tim as its polar extremes, Lerner and his crew captured many memorable performances from both the icons of the 60s and the rising stars of the 70s. If your memory of rock festival flicks is limited to the good vibes of Monterrey or Woodstock, you'll likely be taken aback by the unrestrained belligerence that permeated the air at Wight. Rikki, the so-called "Master of Ceremonies" is the lightning rod here, as he both patronizes and berates the hordes who have descended on the festival site. It turns out that some 600,000 fans have reached the island by ferry but only a fraction of those have any intention of buying a ticket. A tent city called "Desolation Row" sprouts up on a nearby hillside and is populated by folks who are determined to get a closer view at no charge. This tension is reflected in the selection of onstage peformances, like the Who (very much in their prime) ripping through an incediary "Young Man Blues" and the Doors' sinister versions of "When the Music's Over" and "The End". The Isle of Wight has long been notable for being the last performances of both Jim Morrison (he would be gone within a year) and Jimi Hendrix, who died less than three weeks later. Hendrix's appearance here only adds to his already large legacy--his music sounds as revolutionary as ever as he wails away on three songs with the Band of Gypsies, including an otherworldly "Voodoo Chile". "Message to Love" also opens a window onto the growing compartmentilization of rock, with three genres taking root at the start of the 70s. Hard rock (Ten Years After, Free, Rory Gallagher), singer-songwriters (Joni Mitchell, Leonard Cohen, Kris Kristofferson) and progressive rock (the Moody Blues, Jethro Tull and the audacious debut of Emerson, Lake and Palmer)are all competing for their slice of an increasingly large pie. With Rikki and the other promoters dubiously claiming that no other bands will take the stage without being paid in full with cash (in hopes of getting potential gatecrashers to pay up) the musicians are caught in an uneasy position. Trying to show they are "of the people" while knowing full well they are not going through life playing for free, it makes for some of the most interesting stage patter on record. Lerner lets the fans have their say as well, including one who notes that the bands are becoming "plastic gods" while another vividly describes the festival as a "feudal court scene"--with the stars as royalty, the groupies as the courtiers and the audience as the serfs. He may have gone one step farther and noted the moat-like double fencing with a dog-patrolled no-man's-land in between (actually closer in design to the former Berlin Wall) that serves to hopefully keep out the Desolation Row "barbarians". But as one of the promoter's people notes, in the end it doesn't matter if the music's good. This is true enough as the film closes with the Doors, Hendrix and the Who being edited in for one more song each. An uneasy truce is reached but when Rikki flashes a double peace sign at the crowd he only succeeds in looking like Richard Nixon. An era has passed before our eyes as the rose-colored glow of the 60s counterculture is smudged by the inevitable rise of the mass-consumer pop marketplace.

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Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for Message to Love: The Isle of Wight Festival (1997)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
Miles Davis concert footage delcater
Loud and obnoxious Americans cryptical70
The best festival movie ever! marcus-t
What actually happened during Kris Kristofferson's set cryptical70
No takers, huh? drewdeman
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