6.7/10
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Ghosts of Mississippi (1996)

PG-13 | | Drama, History | 3 January 1997 (USA)
A Mississippi district attorney and the widow of Medgar Evers struggle to finally bring a white racist to justice for the 1963 murder of the civil rights leader.

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Nominated for 2 Oscars. Another 2 wins & 7 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Burt DeLaughter
Joseph Tello ...
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Claire DeLaughter (as Alexa Vega)
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Ben Bennett ...
Benny Bennett (as Lloyd 'Benny' Bennett)
Darrell Evers ...
Himself
Yolanda King ...
Reena Evers
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James Van Evers ...
Van Evers
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Storyline

Ghosts of Mississippi is a real-life drama covering the final trial of Byron De La Beckwith, the assassin of heroic civil rights leader Medgar Evers. The movie begins with the murder on June 12, 1963 and the events surrounding the two initial trials which both ended in hung juries. The movie then covers district attorney Bobby De Laughter's transformation and alliance with Myrlie Evers, Medgar Evers' widow, as he becomes more involved with bringing Beckwith to trial for the third time 30 years later. Byron De La Beckwith was convicted on February 5, 1994, after having remained a free man for much of the 30 years after the murder, giving justice for Medgar Evers' family. Written by Joel Schesser <joelsd@aol.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

In 1963, civil rights leader Medgar Evers was murdered in his own driveway. For 30 years, his assassin has remained free. Is it ever too late to do the right thing? See more »

Genres:

Drama | History

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for a strong scene of violence and for racial dialogue | See all certifications »

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Details

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Release Date:

3 January 1997 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Fantasmas del pasado  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

$36,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$168,012 (USA) (20 December 1996)

Gross:

$13,052,741 (USA) (14 March 1997)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(8 channels)|

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Medgar Evers' two sons Darrell Evers and James Van Evers played themselves in this film. His widow Myrlie Evers was also one of this film's consultants. See more »

Goofs

When DeLaughter is brushing his son's hair in the bathroom, the child actor looks off-camera (either at his parent, the director, or a cue card). See more »

Quotes

Medgar Evers: In the horrific deaths of Emmett Till, Reverend G.W. Lee, Lamar Smith and a variety of other atrocities, no one has been convicted. And we feel that those guilty of having commited these ungodly acts have the feeling of assurance that nothing ever would be done. For you see, ladies and gentlemen, white juries have yet to convict a white man in Mississippi guilty of a crime against a Negro.
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Connections

Referenced in 30 Rock: 100: Part 1 (2011) See more »

Soundtracks

I Wish I Knew How It Would Feel to Be Free
Music by Billy Taylor
Lyrics by Billy Taylor and Dick Dallas
Additional arrangement by Marc Shaiman, Dan Higgins and Mervyn Warren
Performed by Nina Simone
Courtesy of The RCA Records Label of BMG Entertainment
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User Reviews

 
We never get even for the wrong we done.
25 May 2014 | by (Leesburg, FL) – See all my reviews

It may not be the best film about race relations in the South. Mississippi Burning and A Time To Kill have more intensity, but it is still compelling and worth watching for some great performances.

Alec Balwin (Bobby DeLaughter) turned in a fine performance. Personally, I feel it is the best he has ever done.

James Woods was perfect as Byron De La Beckwith. He channeled the venomous hatred and cocky arrogance so familiar in those who were consumed with their self-worth, gained by stomping on others. This performance resulted in an Oscar nomination in a year with many fine performances.

Dixie DeLaughter, played by Virginia Madsen, shows how ingrained racism is in the South, and how difficult, if not impossible, it is for a marriage to survive with a disparity in views, whether it be race or politics.

I also enjoyed seeing Wayne Rogers as Morris Dees, even if it was a small role.

This is an important film that should be seen by all who care about the state of race relations in this country.

It should also be see by all young people so they can see a sign at a gas station saying 22 cents a gallon. Those were the days.


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