Foxfire (1996) - News Poster

(1996)

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Return to Ithaca review – Palme d'Or winner's Cuban comrades clean out their closets

Laurent Cantet, director of The Class, zeroes in on a Havana roof terrace for this wistful chamber piece in which old friends meet up to drink, reminisce and exhume old secrets

Laurent Cantet set the seal on his pre-eminence by winning the Cannes Palme d’Or in 2008 with the tough school drama Entre les Murs, or The Class; and then his English-language debut Foxfire (2012), adapted from Joyce Carol Oates, was respectfully received. But this is a very low-key chamber piece from 2014, about a reunion of middle-aged friends, which of course turns out to be an autumnal, bittersweet affair involving the exhumation of painful secrets. It is set mostly in one spot: a roof-terrace overlooking Havana’s Malecón, and has evidently grown out of Cantet’s contribution to the portmanteau movie 7 Days in Havana (2012).

Five old Cuban comrades meet up for drinks: troubled Tanía (Isabel Santos), boisterous neocapitalist Eddy (Jorge Perugorría
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Bet You Forgot About Angelina Jolie's Other Famous Flings

  • Popsugar
Bet You Forgot About Angelina Jolie's Other Famous Flings
Angelina Jolie filed for divorce from Brad Pitt last year, and the news has been met with millions of dropped jaws (including George Clooney's). While Brad and Angie's romance began on the set of Mr. and Mrs. Smith back in 2004, the stunning actress has a list of ex-lovers that includes Billy Bob Thornton, Colin Farrell, and model/actress Jenny Shimizu, whom she worked with on the movie Foxfire in 1996. Keep reading to see who Angelina has loved (and lost) over the years. Related:All the Ladies Who Have Been Romanced by Brad PittThe Way They Were - 31 Times Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie Showered Each Other With LoveThe Sweetest Moments the Jolie-Pitt Kids Have Shared With Their Parents
See full article at Popsugar »

Angelina Jolie's Ex-Girlfriend Jenny Shimizu Marries Michelle Harper: See the Stunning Wedding Photo

Angelina Jolie's Ex-Girlfriend Jenny Shimizu Marries Michelle Harper: See the Stunning Wedding Photo
She did, too! Angelina Jolie's ex-girlfriend Jenny Shimizu also got married recently, tying the knot last week to socialite Michelle Harper. Photos of Harper the bride wearing her voluminous wedding gown on the couple's big day were released Wednesday, Sept. 3. Jolie and Shimizu first met on the set of their 1996 film Foxfire. At the time, Jolie was married to her first husband Jonny Lee Miller. Still, the Oscar winner told Girlfriends magazine that the initial spark with model-actress Shimizu was very much palpable. "I would probably [...]
See full article at Us Weekly »

Swedish cinema's use of the Bechdel test is a provocation that works | Anu Koivunen, Ingrid Ryberg and Laura Horak

Swedish screens are challenging the idea that two women talking to each other is diametrically opposed to film quality

Four independent Swedish cinemas now tell audiences if the films they screen pass the Bechdel test – which requires that a film (1) feature two named female characters who (2) talk to each other about (3) something other than men. Films that meet these criteria get a seal of approval, or an A rating.

The test owes its name to the cartoonist Alison Bechdel, whose 1985 Dykes to Watch Out For comic strip drew attention to how few films appeal to viewers who take pleasure in female "sociality" – forms of social bonding between women. Twenty-eight years later cinemas are turning Bechdel's black humour into policy in order to raise consciousness among audiences about gender imbalance. Indeed, their action has prompted huge national and international debate in recent weeks.

Film critics and scholars, however, have been quick
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Guy Lodge's DVDs and downloads

Baz Luhrmann's Gatsby is a glittering hymn to the age of jazz, while the monster-robot blockbuster Pacific Rim is daftness writ large

Nothing about F Scott Fizgerald's The Great Gatsby feels especially festive: it's all critical despair in stifling summer air, chilled mint juleps and crisp linen suits. Baz Luhrmann's The Great Gatsby (Warner, 12) is another matter: this luxurious pudding seems more at home in the run-up to Christmas (when it was originally slated for release in cinemas) than it did back in May. That may be because Luhrmann has never met a bauble, sparkler or strand of tinsel he didn't like: like all his films, this Gatsby is dressed and decorated to scrumptious excess.

Critics trotting out the tired "style over substance" epithet were missing the point. Style is substance in Luhrmann's universe, and as such, the film is rather effective in capturing the beautiful but damned
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

30 Most Memorable Nude Scenes in Movies

30 Most Memorable Nude Scenes in Movies
Nude scenes.

Some years ago, Entertainment Weekly did a story about the effect nude scenes had on a generation of young people growing up in the 80s. At its core was the idea that, unlike today, where you can just press a button and see boobs and butts any time you want, it used to be a lot harder to see that most 'holy of holies'.

There was a time when some of the scenes on this list were all that we had! As time has gone on, even with the proliferation of ways to see nudity, a really good nude scene still manages to get our hearts (and other things) racing. Even here in 2013.

So feast your eyes on (maybe not the best, or greatest but...) the Top 30 Most Memorable Nude Scenes in motion picture history over the past couple of decades. Sorry ladies, this list is quite male specific.
See full article at MovieWeb »

The 30 Most Memorable Nude Scenes in Movies

The 30 Most Memorable Nude Scenes in Movies
Nude scenes.

Some years ago, Entertainment Weekly did a story about the effect nude scenes had on a generation of young people growing up in the 80s. At its core was the idea that, unlike today, where you can just press a button and see boobs and butts any time you want, it used to be a lot harder to see that most 'holy of holies'.

There was a time when some of the scenes on this list were all that we had! As time has gone on, even with the proliferation of ways to see nudity, a really good nude scene still manages to get our hearts (and other things) racing. Even here in 2013.

So feast your eyes on (maybe not the best, or greatest but...) the Top 30 Most Memorable Nude Scenes in motion picture history over the past couple of decades. Sorry ladies, this list is quite male specific.
See full article at MovieWeb »

Savannah | Review

Fare is Fowl: Haywood-Carter’s Dire Return to Directing

Annette Haywood-Carter, perhaps best known for her 1996 directorial debut Foxfire, an adaption of a Joyce Carol Oates novel starring a nubile Angelina Jolie (which was remade in 2012 by Laurent Cantet), returns with her first directorial outing in thirteen years with Savannah, a based-on-a-true-story account of a 1920s hunter from the memoir Ward Allen: Savannah River Market Hunter. Locally produced, the figure in question seems to be a well-known local legend in Savannah, Georgia. However, the headscratchingly vague title should give you the first indication that some beautifully photographed landscape shots are the only aspect of interest in this bewilderingly bland exercise about a highly energetic hunter indisposed to frequent bouts of drinking, best known for rejecting his inheritance to (sometimes illegally) hunt with his black best friend forever at his side.

Opening in 1954 Savannah, we meet the wizened Christmas Moultrie (Chiwetel Ejiofor
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Watch: 2 Clips From 'The Class' Director Laurent Cantet's 'Foxfire'

It's been a while since we've talked about Laurent Cantet's "Foxfire," and well, that's because there hasn't been much to talk about. While the movie marks the director's followup to his Palme d'Or-winning "The Class," when it premiered last year at Tiff, it didn't make much noise, and as far as we know, it's still without any U.S. distribution. But the movie has already opened across the pond, and as such, two clips from the movie have arrived. In adapting Joyce Carol Oates' celebrated novel, Cantet rounded up some newcomers—Claire Mazerolle, Kate Coseni and Madeleine Bisson—to lead the story of five teenagers from a small town in New York State in the 1950s who, out of their distrust of society, form a secret group called Foxfire to avenge the humiliations they have suffered at the hands of men. And if anything, these two scenes showcase
See full article at The Playlist »

Foxfire – review

This brilliantly acted drama about a 1950s New York girl gang works as both social history and political allegory

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Laurent Cantet started out 14 years ago as a kind of French Ken Loach, using a non-professional cast in the thoughtful leftwing Human Resources to deal with class and industrial relations in a provincial factory. He followed it up with Time Out (2001), about a middle-management executive who conceals his redundancy from his family, and The Class (2008), his Cannes prize-winning study of a year in a tough, racially mixed inner-city school in Paris. Both were also performed by non-professionals, though in between he made Heading South (2005), in which three prominent actresses played Americans visiting Haiti as sex tourists. In his confident, strangely gripping new film Foxfire, he's again working with a largely non-professional cast but this time in the recent American past.

Based on a novel by the prolific,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Film review: Foxfire - It's the Fifties, but the chrome can't compete with the gleam of girls getting even

Here's a Riot Grrl story if ever there was one: a bunch of rebellious young women form a gang, smite their male oppressors and generally paint small-town America red. It could be the premise for something pulpy and brash, and according to reviews, that's what the 1996 adaptation of Joyce Carol Oates's novel Foxfire was, with its showcase lead for an up-and-coming Angelina Jolie. I haven't seen that film, and I suspect you haven't either, so let's agree that the new screen version of the book starts with a clean slate.
See full article at The Independent »

Alan Partridge, The Lone Ranger, Percy Jackson: this week's new films

Alan Partridge: Alpha Papa | The Lone Ranger | Foxfire | David Bowie Is Happening Now | Percy Jackson: Sea Of Monsters | Grown Ups 2 | Looking For Hortense | Silence | Chennai Express

Alan Partridge: Alpha Papa (15)

(Declan Lowney, 2013, UK) Steve Coogan, Colm Meaney, Sean Pertwee, Felicity Montagu, Anna Maxwell Martin. 90 mins

Coogan's comic alter-ego goes big screen at last, but fear not: he's just as pathetically provincial and inadvertently offensive as he ever was – and just as consistently hilarious. A siege situation at Partridge's Norfolk radio station is the excuse to "open out" the scenario and explore the talk DJ's latent heroic side, but – as usual – the day is saved by Coogan's deft characterisation, some great writing and a love/hate fascination with Middle English mediocrity.

The Lone Ranger (12A)

(Gore Verbinski, 2013, Us) Johnny Depp, Armie Hammer. 149 mins

Where Verbinski and Depp struck a great action-comedy balance with Pirates Of The Caribbean (and Rango), attempts
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The HeyUGuys Interview: Laurent Cantet discusses Foxfire

  • HeyUGuys
Coming off the back of the Palme d’Or winning The Class – it’s safe to say there’s a little more attention and pressure on French filmmaker Laurent Cantet’s shoulders this time around as he presents his latest picture Foxfire, hitting cinema screens on August 9. Having won the most prestigious prize in world cinema back in 2008, we were rather excited about interviewing him.

Despite the pressure – which he discusses in this interview – fortunately he triumphs with Foxfire, a picture that depicts the rising of a group of young women rebelling against a sexist society. He also talks of his decision to make his first English speaking feature, and how he went about depicting a somewhat different 1950s America to what we have seen before on the big screen – while he also tells us if he has ever seen the 1996 adaptation (starring Angelina Jolie) of the famous Joyce Carol Oates novel.
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Laurent Cantet on filming Foxfire's teenage energy and despair

The award-winning French director talks about the challenge of adapting Joyce Carol Oates' novel about a secret society of teenage girls

Five years ago, after winning the 2008 Palme d'Or for his fourth feature film, The Class, Laurent Cantet was unexpectedly elevated to an elite group of international film-makers. In his previous three features, Cantet had shown himself an able, interesting director, but not necessarily an attention-grabbing one. He had earned a reputation, through films such as Human Resources and Time Out, as France's answer to Ken Loach: an earnest director motivated by his conscience, but who wore his political commitments lightly. The Class, however, changed all that: shot in Cantet's characteristic low-key faux-documentary manner, it struck a chord in France with its portrait of a teacher's struggle with a roomful of stroppy teenagers in contemporary Paris, and propelled him into the big league.

After a world premiere almost
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Foxfire – review

Laurent Cantet's followup to his prizewinning The Class focuses on a secret society of high-school girls, with faultless performances all round

Adapted from Joyce Carol Oates' teen-empowerment novel, Laurent Cantet's follow up to the Palme d'Or-winner The Class excavates the mindset of another group of awkward, rebellious teenagers, this time in smalltown America in the 1950s. Foxfire is the name given to a secret society of high-school girls determined to fight back against sexual abuse and day-to-day sexism; they are led by the charismatic Legs (Raven Adamson), and include the beefy Goldie (Claire Mazerolle), boy-mad Rita (Madeleine Bisson), and serious-minded Maddy (Katie Coseni), through whose narrative voice we see events proceed. Cantet extracts faultless performances from his cast, most of whom are on a film set for the first time, and evokes the period effortlessly. At well over two hours, Foxfire never feels long; though it unravels
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Film Review: 'Foxfire'

  • CineVue
★★☆☆☆ Having bagged the prestigious Palme d'Or prize for his last film, 2008's vérité high school drama The Class, award-winning French director Laurent Cantet returns to selected UK cinemas this week with his new feature, Foxfire (2012). Based on Joyce Carol Oates' novel of the same name, it shares some themes with the director's previous piece, but trades modern France for 1950s America. In place of surly Parisian students, the tale presents an unruly gang of young proto-feminists in patriarchal upstate New York, but sadly fails to craft any particular drama of note, despite it seeming inevitable from the outset.

The pacing plays a decisive role in this aforementioned issue, with Cantet's latest getting off to an engaging start before becoming listless, particularly during the second act; this is hardly helped by a cast of characters that lacks depth outside of the ringleader. It's the sparky 'Legs' (an excellent Raven Adamson
See full article at CineVue »

Foxfire Review

  • HeyUGuys
Some of the finest ever Hollywood filmmakers have hailed from Europe, with the likes of Billy Wilder and Ernst Lubitsch, to name just two, managing to bring their cultural sensibilities and ingenuity to Tinsel Town, embracing the Hollywood romanticism yet always remaining faithful to their roots. Another filmmaker hoping to join that exclusive list is Laurent Cantet, with his debut English speaking picture Foxfire – his first directorial outing since the Palme d’Or winning The Class. No pressure, eh?

Set in 1950s upstate New York, Foxfire is an adaptation of the renowned Joyce Carol Oates novel, a novel that has already been interpreted on screen, in the 1996 attempt starring Angelina Jolie in the lead role of Legs. In this instance, such a role is taken by Raven Adamson, playing the ringleader in a compulsive and anarchist group of young girls, forming a gang called Foxfire and rebelling against an ultimately sexist society.
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Still Waiting For '12 Years A Slave'? Watch The Trailer For Chiwetel Ejiofor's Other Freed Slave Movie 'Savannah'

Bet you forgot about this movie didn't you? First announced back in 2011 and shot the same year, it seems we're going to get a double dose of Chiwetel Ejiofor playing a freed slave in 2013. Of course, he's set to lead the hugely anticipated "12 Years A Slave," but he's also got a co-starring role in the forthcoming indie "Savannah," and the first trailer has arrived to give you a peek at another tale dealing with America's slavery past. Just like in "12 Years A Slave," this is also based on a true story, telling the tale of a freed slave, Christmas Moultrie (Ejifor), who enters a business partnership in the early 1900s with Ward Allen (Jim Caviezel), which leads to complications in a South that is a bit slower to change with the times. Ward and Moultrie must essentially battle to keep running their business, while preserving their friendship and way of life along the Savannah River.
See full article at The Playlist »

Review: "Valencia: The Movie" premieres at Frameline

Tags: Michelle TeaSilas HowardmoviesValenciabooksMovie ReviewsIMDbFrameline

Valencia the book, written by Michelle Tea, was something of a game-changer when it came out in 2000. Encapsulating the glory, the burn out, and the guerilla punk aesthetic of ‘90s queerdom in San Francisco, Valencia captured the literal and metaphoric spunk of an era, which was especially welcome since prior lesbian lit was too often relegated to the pulpy (Rubyfruit Jungle) or the depressing (Well of Loneliness).

Valencia: The Movie/s took the pioneering spirit of the book and gave it a drag queen makeover. Experimental, ambitious, and Big, Valencia brought together a whopping 20 queer filmmakers who each contributed a five to seven minute short (18 total) based on a chapter from the book. Frontlined by Tea and producer/director Hilary Goldberg, some of the filmmakers included Cheryl Dunye, Courtney Trouble, Silas Howard, Michelle Lawler, Samuel Topiary and Cary Cronenwett. Each short stars a different “Michelle” as well,
See full article at AfterEllen.com »

9 Secretly Beautiful Hollywood Screenwriters

If you're stoked on "Stoker," you can thank "Prison Break" star Wentworth Miller, who is making his screenwriting debut with the gothic Park Chan-wook affair. Miller wrote the script under a pseudonym, and the results ended up on the 2010 Black List of hot screenplays that weren't yet snagged by studios.

Wentworth, we hardly knew ye!

Miller isn't the only surprising star doing double-duty as a writer, either. He joins an impressive list of famous, Hollywood faces that wield a mean pen or, more likely, the latest version of Final Draft.

Rashida Jones

Her "Parks and Rec" alter ego Ann Perkins is "a beautiful tropical fish" and "a beautiful, rule-breaking moth," and even "a beautiful, talented, brilliant, powerful musk ox," on occasion, according to her Bff Leslie Knope (Amy Poehler). Off-screen, Rashida Jones is proving to be a rather formidable creative force as well. She and writing partner Will McCormack penned
See full article at NextMovie »
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