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For Those Who Hunt the Wounded Down (1996)

Jerry Bines is trying to live down a past that includes killing a man (in self-defence), theft and an alcoholic, abusive father. He sees hope for redemption by providing life-giving bone ... See full summary »

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3 wins & 3 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Jerry Bines
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Loretta
Niklas Konowal ...
Willie
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Gary Percy Rils
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Alvin
Nancy Beatty ...
Franny
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Ralphie
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Adele
Maggie Huculak ...
Vera
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Nevin
David Brown ...
Officer Petrie
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Lucy Bines
Pauline Broderick ...
Mother in Car
Robb Paterson ...
Dr. Lem
Victor Cowie ...
Doctor (as Vic Cowie)
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Storyline

Jerry Bines is trying to live down a past that includes killing a man (in self-defence), theft and an alcoholic, abusive father. He sees hope for redemption by providing life-giving bone marrow to his leukemia-stricken son. But time is running out because an escaped killer (Gary Percy Rils) is coming to town to exact revenge for ancient sins. And like the old buck in a backwoods tale he spins for his kid, Bines must stop running and turn to face his hunter. Written by Anonymous

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Thriller

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User Reviews

The Hunters.... They hunt don't they
2 October 2005 | by (nova scotia) – See all my reviews

"For those that hunt the wounded down" introduces Jerry (played by Callum Keith Rennie), a man numbed and haunted by unsettling memories. Jerry, though haunted, carries on with what may be considered mundane activities. The figures around him are loaded with burdens that could be explosive if not also dulled by routine. Emphasis on the particularities of Jerry's sadness sets him apart from others, however. His Sorrow out-stands because it is active: It threatens to invade routine. In this way we observe sorrow as both perpetual and pushy. Jerry is numbed, but doom is coming, and cannot be emaciated. This feature of the story strikes me enduringly. I always imagine Jerry a wounded figure, walking through the forest, tracked by hunters, heading toward nothing other than one final movement. Such finality cinematically arrives, and a last burst is solely becoming. It is not quite heroic, nor is it comforting. One is only left to reflect on this wounded figure's final breath, the very breath that had haunted, a breath that arrives because the severity of the man's pain does not permit anything additional.

I really wish those who hunt would turn away, and leave the wounded to some other fate. But they are hunters. When the hunter strikes, a final blow assertively follows.


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