5.2/10
8,076
15 user 19 critic

First Kid (1996)

PG | | Family, Comedy | 30 August 1996 (USA)
A former boxer turned Secret Service agent is assigned to protect the President's son, who seems determined to make life difficult for his new protector.

Director:

(as David M. Evans)

Writer:

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From $2.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

ON DISC
1 nomination. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Erin Williby ...
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Rob
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Jemar Jefferson ...
Andre (as Jemar Jewann Jefferson)
Daniel Baron ...

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Storyline

Luke Davenport is the thirteen-year-old son of Paul Davenport, the President of the United States, and first lady Linda Davenport. Ill tempered Agent Woods is the secret service agent in charge of Luke. Woods is fired after mistreating Luke in front of the press. Woods is then replaced by former boxer Sam Simms, who won a boxing title in 1977. Sam is eager to take the job - even though no one else wants it. Everyone thinks that Luke is just a brat when the only thing Luke wants is to just fit in and be like every other kid at his school, the Georgetown Academy. Sam almost gets fired when Luke gets decked at school by school bully Rob MacArthur. This is when Sam decides to use his boxing expertise to teach Luke how to fight. Luke has his eyes on class-mate Katie Warren, but so does Rob. Katie agrees to go with Luke to an upcoming school dance, so Sam teaches Luke how to dance. Rob is also at the dance, but this time when Rob tries to deck Luke, Luke turns the tables and decks Rob. Sam ... Written by Todd Baldridge <sandib@eastky.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

He's young. He's wild. He's fun. And he's the one protecting the President's son.

Genres:

Family | Comedy

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for some violence, language and brief partial nudity | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Official Sites:

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

30 August 1996 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Baskan çocugu  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$8,434,651 (USA) (30 August 1996)

Gross:

$26,459,681 (USA) (24 January 1997)
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Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

A few scenes were shot at St. Catherine's School, Richmond, Virginia. See more »

Goofs

When Luke sneaks out to the mall to meet "mongoose12" his dog brandy is sitting on the bed which is made, then he calls her over and they sneak out through the passage. When the secret service agents unlock the doors (which by the way one door would need to be latched in order for them to be locked at all, which they're not, the agents go into the room, and the bed is unmade like it had been slept in. See more »

Quotes

Luke Davenport: What are you doing?
Sam Simms: I'm doing my job, keepin' you alive, I'm testing your food.
Luke Davenport: But why do you always test my cookies?
See more »

Connections

Referenced in Parks and Recreation: Ms. Knope Goes to Washington (2012) See more »

Soundtracks

Eel Pie Blues
Written and Performed by Steve Donnelly
Courtesy of Audio Action
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User Reviews

 
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9 November 2005 | by (Klagenfurt, Austria) – See all my reviews

Okay, okay. The movie doesn't aim at high quality. It's not meant to be. It is meant to be funny and entertaining. It is shallow and sometimes oversubscribed. However, I thought that a) Brock Pierce did a wonderful job, b) I could deduce some messages of life, c) the plot was nice and d) the interaction between Sinbad and Brock was rather substantial and well staged. Brock Pierce showed how lonesome and frustrating the life as the "First Kid" can be, how isolated he is and how much he suffers from this isolation. Sinbad - I mean, he is a clumsy guy, but he did fine in here. I never thought that he was constrained or fake. The movie as a whole lacks a realistic storyline, but that didn't matter to me. I was rather attracted by the scene in which Brock told him amid tears how outcast he felt, and I thought it was witty how Sinbad showed him what to do about it. Definitely not a masterpiece but surely above the average.


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