5.8/10
101
5 user

Devil's Food (1996)

When a TV anchor woman finds her career to be hampered by her uncontrollable weight problems, she closes a deal with the devil. He lends her her ideal weight, she promises him her soul. By ... See full summary »

Director:

Writer:

Reviews

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Credited cast:
...
Sally McCormick
...
Seymour Kecker
...
Andrew Burns
...
Charles Leyden
...
Dori Vogel
John Evans ...
Stan Keats
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Nick Benedict ...
Traffic Cop
Catherine Blythe
...
Abbot's Clerk
Nancy Cser ...
Dr. Pace
...
Margaret
...
Female Reporter
...
WPKV News Director
David Hemblen ...
Deep Voice
Jon Jaber ...
Arabian King
Edit

Storyline

When a TV anchor woman finds her career to be hampered by her uncontrollable weight problems, she closes a deal with the devil. He lends her her ideal weight, she promises him her soul. By contract. Soon enough she realizes she's made a terrible mistake and tries to negotiate her way out of it. Alas, the devil knows but one motto: "a deal is a deal", and now he's ready to collect... Written by Swie Tio <sweet_t@dds.nl>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy

Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

2 September 1996 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Devil's Food - Eine wirklich teuflische Diät  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show more on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

TV announcer makes a bargain with the Devil to lose weight.
3 October 2015 | by See all my reviews

An aspiring TV announcer makes a bargain with the Devil in order to lose weight.

I've been looking for something about this movie for years and I'm glad to find it. Now to find it for sale at a reasonable price.

I agree that "Devil's Food" is mostly pretty silly except for the element that should be its main point. The television industry's use of near-glamorous actresses to read us the news is both hilarious and sickening—and it is portrayed wonderfully here.

(The credibility of sexy female TV announcers may very well have improved over the past twenty years; I don't know. I stopped relying on well painted and plasticized ladies who kept right on smiling while describing the scene of a horrible accident.)

So, how does Suzanne Somers come away from her bargain with the Devil? I'll not tell!


0 of 0 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 5 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page