Breaking the Waves
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8 items from 2017


9 Thoughts on Cannes 2017

27 May 2017 11:31 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The Cannes Film Festival played host to some good movies this year (there is never a year when it doesn’t), yet throughout the 12-day event, there has been a pervasive feeling, shared by critics and distributors and publicists and audiences alike, that the festival’s been having a soft year, that the magic was tamped down. It had something do with the lack of a universally agreed upon home run, like “Toni Erdmann” or “Amour” or “4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days” or “Breaking the Waves.” (There were a handful of doubles and triples, but more disputes than not about all of them.) It had something to do with the new security system (long, slow lines to get through metal detectors), which freighted the simple act of walking into a movie with a touch of that airport depression. For all that, Cannes is still Cannes: the most momentous film festival in the world. »

- Owen Gleiberman

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Yu Ji-tae to feature in Lars von Trier's 'The House That Jack Built'

26 April 2017 3:22 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Oldboy star becomes first Asian actor to appear in a von Trier movie.

Korean actor Yu Ji-tae, known for playing the villain in Oldboy, is featuring in The House That Jack Built – the upcoming film from Lars von Trier, controversial Danish director of films such as Nymphomania and Melancholia.

This will be the first time an Asian actor has featured in a von Trier film, according to Danish sales agent TrustNordisk and Korean distributor Atnine Film.

Atnine, which previously distributed Nymphomania, discussed Yu with TrustNordisk for the as-yet-undisclosed short role. The two companies suggested the actor to the filmmakers, as confirmed by production company Zentropa.

Lars von Trier, Yu Ji-tae, Manon Rasmussen © Atnine Film Co., Ltd.

The House That Jack Built takes place in America in the 1970’s and over the course of 12 years charts the evolution of a serial killer called Jack.

Matt Dillon stars as Jack, joined by Uma Thurman, Bruno Gantz and »

- hjnoh2007@gmail.com (Jean Noh)

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Brimstone Review

9 March 2017 12:52 PM, PST | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Women never have a particularly great time in Westerns. Aside from the odd outlier, the genre generally features them as either helpless victims or sex workers, though both endure intense violence at the hands of men. Martin Koolhoven’s Brimstone takes this to new extremes; spending most of its 140 punishing minutes inflicting humiliation, misery and trauma upon its female characters.

By the time the credits roll, you’ll have seen women intimidated, leered at, strangled, punched, whipped, beaten, gagged, having their tongues cut out, sexually menaced by their fathers, repeatedly raped and eventually executed. It’s a smörgåsbord of misogyny: a film populated by yellow-teethed, half feral, sexually psychotic men preying on women whose only plausible escape is suicide. Brimstone is less a battle of the sexes and more a massacre.

Split into four chapters, each with portentous Biblical titles like ‘Revelations’ and ‘Exodus,’ the film consists of episodes in »

- David James

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Lars von Trier’s ‘The House That Jack Built’ May Premiere at Cannes, Despite That Whole ‘Persona Non Grata’ Thing

9 March 2017 11:31 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Persona non grata no longer? Six years after being banned from the Cannes Film Festival for what might generously be described as an ill-advised Hitler joke, Lars von Trier and his team are said to be in negotiations to premiere his next film on the Croisette. The Danish auteur is currently at work on “The House That Jack Built,” which could potentially debut at Cannes last year.

Read More: Lars von Trier Wants You to Know ‘The House That Jack Built’ Will Be His Most Brutal Film Ever

At a press conference in Dalsland, Sweden, co-producer Louise Vesth alluded to the vaunted French festival, saying “I have talked to the people I know in Cannes and … yeah, maybe.” That could be a big maybe, all things considered.

“I thought I was a Jew for a long time and was very happy being a Jew … Then it turned out that I »

- Michael Nordine

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Lars von Trier Wants You to Know ‘The House That Jack Built’ Will Be His Most Brutal Film Ever

8 March 2017 7:59 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Lars von Trier is finally back behind the camera for his first feature since “Nymphomaniac,” and we’re not sure whether we should be excited or flat out terrified, especially since the drama is about the coming of age of a serial killer. “The House that Jack Built,” which is set over 12 years and focuses on five key murders, is currently filming in Bengtfors, Sweden, and von Trier took some time to meet with press (via ScreenDaily) alongside stars Matt Dillon and Uma Thurman and producers Louise Vesth and Madeleine Ekman.

“I chose Matt and I chose Uma because they obviously can’t read,” von Trier said. He may have been using his trademark sarcasm, but it’s clear even the director knows this is going to be his most brutal movie to date, which is saying something coming from the man behind “Nymphomaniac,” “Breaking the Waves” and “Antichrist.”

Read »

- Zack Sharf

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Film Review: ‘Duckweed’

7 February 2017 4:41 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The biggest surprise about “Duckweed,” the sophomore feature written and directed by China’s superstar writer-blogger Han Han, is its absolute predictability. A dramedy in which a car racer time-travels to the late ’90s and becomes his estranged father’s partner-in-crime, the film features plot turns and emotional arcs that are all easy to anticipate. What the movie does reflect is how China is moving ahead so fast that millennials are already glancing at the not-so-distant past and its values with jaded amusement and nostalgia. More relaxed and carefree than any of the Lunar New Year blockbusters jostling for the holiday crowd, the film is sprinkled with witty grace notes and is crowd-pleasing without being too ingratiating or idiotic.

Those who admire Han’s pithy prose or the sublime poetry of his debut feature “The Continent” may feel he’s punching below his weight here, but the absence of intellectual »

- Maggie Lee

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Sex and the middle-aged woman … a groundbreaking BBC drama tells it like it is

14 January 2017 1:30 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Emily Watson tells why her role in Apple Tree Yard has been a delight

She made her name with raw and unfettered performances in films such as Breaking the Waves and Hilary and Jackie, but at the age of 50 Emily Watson admits that she thought those days were behind her. Then she was offered the leading role in the BBC’s eagerly awaited adaptation of Louise Doughty’s acclaimed thriller, Apple Tree Yard, playing a middle-aged woman who begins an unlikely and increasingly dangerous affair.

Related: Louise Doughty: ‘I don’t think I write thrillers – but other people seem to’

Continue reading »

- Sarah Hughes

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Sex and the middle-aged woman … a groundbreaking BBC drama tells it like it is

14 January 2017 1:30 PM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Emily Watson tells why her role in Apple Tree Yard has been a delight

She made her name with raw and unfettered performances in films such as Breaking the Waves and Hilary and Jackie, but at the age of 50 Emily Watson admits that she thought those days were behind her. Then she was offered the leading role in the BBC’s eagerly awaited adaptation of Louise Doughty’s acclaimed thriller, Apple Tree Yard, playing a middle-aged woman who begins an unlikely and increasingly dangerous affair.

Related: Louise Doughty: ‘I don’t think I write thrillers – but other people seem to’

Continue reading »

- Sarah Hughes

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2002 | 2000

8 items from 2017


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