Bottle Rocket
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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006

18 items from 2016


Christopher Nolan’s First Released Short Film ‘Doodlebug’: Watch His Twisted 1997 Debut

17 July 2016 3:08 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Nearly a decade before he was making movies about bats, Christopher Nolan was turning his attention to bugs. The filmmaker made a debut of sorts with 1997’s “Doodlebug,” a three-minute short filmed on 16mm and produced by his future wife and producing partner Emma Thomas, who’s worked with Nolan on each of his subsequent films.

Read More: Wes Anderson’s ‘Bottle Rocket’ Short Film: Watch the 13 Minute Clip That Launched His Career

Doodlebug” is marked by a grainy, black-and-white aesthetic that’s of a piece with the spar narrative about a man (Jeremy Theobald) trying to squash an insect in his dingy apartment. It eventually gets recursive, with the bug in question being revealed as a miniature version of the man himself; in the end, they’re both of them dwarfed by an even larger version who appears behind them.

Read More: James Cameron’s ‘Xenogenesis’: Watch the Lo-Fi, »

- Michael Nordine

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IndieWire Turns 20: An Oral History of Supporting Filmmakers and Partying at Sundance From Those Who Lived It

14 July 2016 7:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

On July 15, 1996, IndieWire launched as an e-mail newsletter providing “the daily news service for independent film.” (See the first newsletter here.) The original iteration of the site was the brainchild of Cheri Barner, Eugene Hernandez and Mark Rabinowitz, three recent college students obsessed with the movies. In the ensuing years, IndieWire grew and changed hands many times over. Barner now works as a talent manager in Los Angeles, Hernandez is the deputy director of the Film Society Lincoln Center, and Rabinowitz is a freelance publicist, consultant and programmer.

But they have remained a part of our close-knit community. As IndieWire arrives at its 20th anniversary, the trio gathered together for their first joint interview to recall the early days of IndieWire — as well as the thriving American independent film scene that inspired the publication. 

Eugene Hernandez: IndieWire was an outgrowth of something that Mark, Cheri and I had started in 1995. At the time, »

- Eric Kohn

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The Case For ‘The Darjeeling Limited’ as Wes Anderson’s Most Humanistic Film

11 July 2016 11:32 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Wes Anderson has garnered a strong following and undeniably unique back catalogue in the 20 years he has been making films. Since his debut Bottle Rocket, he has been sharpening his vision of storytelling with his particular cinematic language. A new video essay by Nerd Writer discusses how Anderson’s filmography warrants less of a competition between which is best, but rather which strikes a particular audience member the hardest from a subjective standpoint to posit it his “best” work, as opposed to one or another’s objectively superior quality. The video dives into why The Darjeeling Limited, despite being the least-seen of his wide releases upon initial debut, has had the most impact for the author, a touching film about communication (or lack thereof), family, and grief.

Of particular note is the pondering that while not the formal peak of Anderson’s continually sharpening style, Darjeeling may be Anderson’s most humanistic film. »

- Mike Mazzanti

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13 Movies Hollywood Will Probably Remake

2 July 2016 3:36 PM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Nobody may believe this, but Every film could be remade. There are many reasons for this. Sometimes it is done to improve on the previous film. Other times it is done to update a film from years past. There have no doubt been times that something was remade simply because that was a way to squeeze more money out of the property. And if Hollywood continues to employ this trend, sooner or later, every movie, no matter how classic, will probably get resurrected in some way shape or form. No matter how much fans don't want it to happen.

It appears that some films have gotten remade simply because there wasn't a good case against remaking it. If you're a studio head then the numbers make a lot of sense. People know the property, the characters, the story, etc. Nobody is going to be 'literally' hurt by remaking said film, »

- MovieWeb

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From ‘The Bfg’ to ‘Matilda’: How 5 Roald Dahl Books Landed on the Big Screen

29 June 2016 4:19 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Roald Dahl famously loathed all the movie adaptations of his books, including the 1971 classic “Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory” starring Gene Wilder. So when the beloved author died in 1990, his widow Felicity (who goes by Liccy) was torn about what to do with his catalogue. It was a time, following the hit comedy “Home Alone,” where the major studios were vigorously chasing family-friendly tales, and many of Dahl’s stories fit the bill. But Liccy didn’t want celebrated bestsellers such as “Matilda” or “James and the Giant Peach” falling into the wrong hands.

Dahl’s publisher at Penguin Books set up a few meetings, and she eventually connected with literary agent Michael Siegel. They bonded right away. “I don’t want there to be bad movies,” Liccy told him. They came up with an unorthodox, boutique approach. “Rather than sell the stories directly to the studios, we would »

- Ramin Setoodeh

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James Cameron’s ‘Xenogenesis’: Watch the Lo-Fi, Futuristic 1978 Short Film That Gave Him His Start

26 June 2016 1:16 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Before he was working with hundred-million-dollar budgets — hell, before he was even making that “Piranha” sequel — James Cameron was an aspiring filmmaker like any other. He first announced himself to the world with 1978’s “Xenogenesis,” a 12-minute short made in 1978. If you’re curious where the king of the world got his start, watch the shoestring sci-fi project below.

Read More: Wes Anderson’s ‘Bottle Rocket’ Short Film: Watch the 13 Minute Clip That Launched His Career

Beginning with a series of illustrations set to narrated voiceover, the film bills itself as “man’s ultimate adventure.” William Wisher stars as a passenger aboard a sentient spacecraft looking for a suitable environment to start anew — imagine a shoestring version of the prologue from “Prometheus.” Long before he reaches this new beginning, the spacefarer encounters a rather large robot whose functionality appears to extend well beyond maintenance and upkeep. This results in the »

- Michael Nordine

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Wes Anderson’s ‘Bottle Rocket’ Short Film: Watch the 13 Minute Clip That Launched His Career

25 June 2016 3:28 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

In 1992 a relatively unknown Wes Anderson shot the 13-minute short film, “Bottle Rocket.” Co-written by Anderson and Owen Wilson, the quirky black and white film, set to a snazzy Jazz score, showed brothers Owen and Luke Wilson as thieves in training.

The short was shown at the 1994 Sundance Film Festival and received critical praise. Two years later, Anderson took this piece and created a full feature of the same name, again starring the Wilson brothers.

The film followed Anthony (Luke), recently released from a mental hospital after having a nervous breakdown, who joins his friend Dignan (Owen), as they hatch a scheme for a yet-unspecified crime spree that involves one of their former boss’.

Read More: ‘Watership Down’: Wes Anderson, Guillermo del Toro & More Describe Story’s Impact Ahead Of New Miniseries

The 1996 film generated great buzz and launched the careers of Anderson and the Wilsons.

From there, the »

- Liz Calvario

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Owen Wilson & Luke Wilson Will Be Back On The Big Screen Together For Prison Comedy

11 May 2016 1:23 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Though they got their start together in 1996’s “Bottle Rocket,” Wes Anderson’s directorial debut, it’s been a over a decade since acting brothers Luke and Owen Wilson worked together on a film. Their last effort together being 2005’s ill-fated “The Wendell Baker Story,” which Luke also wrote and co-directed with their brother, Andrew. Since then, […]

The post Owen Wilson & Luke Wilson Will Be Back On The Big Screen Together For Prison Comedy appeared first on The Playlist. »

- Will Ashton

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Remembering Douglas Slocombe, Skandies 2015, Scorsese’s Influence on Wes Anderson, and More

22 February 2016 1:31 PM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Dailies is a round-up of essential film writing, news bits, videos, and other highlights from across the Internet. If you’d like to submit a piece for consideration, get in touch with us in the comments below or on Twitter at @TheFilmStage.

See the full list of winners of the 2016 Berlin Film Festival at Keyframe, and all of our reviews here.

Watch a short documentary on the career of legendary cinematographer Douglas Slocombe, who has passed away at the age of 103:

RogerEbert.com‘s Matt Zoller Seitz on why Leonardo DiCaprio winning an Oscar for The Revenant would be bad for acting:

The acting-as-punishment routine takes this mentality to its lowest depth. Right now Leonardo DiCaprio is the front-runner in the Best Actor race for his performance in the survival epic “The Revenant,” in which he plays an 1830s trapper seeking revenge against a colleague who betrayed him and »

- TFS Staff

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Justin Theroux Wrote Zoolander 2, Plus 15 More Actors You Didn't Know Are Also Screenwriters

16 February 2016 2:30 PM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

"That Justin Theroux guy - where do I know him from?" Depending on whom you ask, you could get a great many answers. Of course, he's the husband of Jennifer Aniston, but he's had a string of notable acting roles too. He could be that guy from The Leftovers, the actor who played the hapless director character in Mulholland Drive, Leslie Knope's short-lived boyfriend on Parks and Recreation, or even the bad guy from Charlie's Angels: Full Throttle. However, Theroux is also a screenwriter, and he's credited with a handful of major films that casual movie-goers might not associate with him. »

- Drew Mackie, @drewgmackie

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Justin Theroux Wrote Zoolander 2, Plus 15 More Actors You Didn't Know Are Also Screenwriters

16 February 2016 2:30 PM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

"That Justin Theroux guy - where do I know him from?" Depending on whom you ask, you could get a great many answers. Of course, he's the husband of Jennifer Aniston, but he's had a string of notable acting roles too. He could be that guy from The Leftovers, the actor who played the hapless director character in Mulholland Drive, Leslie Knope's short-lived boyfriend on Parks and Recreation, or even the bad guy from Charlie's Angels: Full Throttle. However, Theroux is also a screenwriter, and he's credited with a handful of major films that casual movie-goers might not associate with him. »

- Drew Mackie, @drewgmackie

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Daily | Scorsese, Gomes, DeMille

9 February 2016 3:54 PM, PST | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

In today's roundup: Martin Scorsese's Taxi Driver at 40, a personal history of Wes Anderson's Bottle Rocket, an appreciation of Miguel Gomes's Arabian Nights, another on Moussa Touré's The Pirogue, revisiting Cecil B. DeMille's The Cheat, Alex Ross Perry on Dennis Hopper in Lawrence Schiller and L.M. Kit Carson's The American Dreamer, Nicole Brenez on Jocelyne Saab, J. Hoberman on Richard Lester, Jonathan Rosenbaum on Tran Anh Hung's The Scent of Green Papaya, Daniel Kasman on Michael Bay, Stuart Klawans on Amos Gitai’s Rabin, the Last Day and Joseph Dorman and Oren Rudavsky's Colliding Dreams, Soraya Roberts on Winona Ryder, Matt Thrift on Robert De Niro—and much, much more. » - David Hudson »

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From Ryan Reynolds to Kathy Griffin, 15 of Our Favorite X-Files Guest Stars

24 January 2016 10:55 AM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Sunday is the day X-Files diehards have been waiting for: For the first time since 2002, we get to watch new episodes of one of the biggest cult favorite series in TV history. And not only are David Duchovny and Gillian Anderson reprising the roles of Agents Mulder and Scully, but they're bringing with them Mitch Pileggi (Assistant FBI Director Walter Skinner), William B. Davis (the Cigarette Smoking Man), The Lone Gunmen (overcoming the notable handicap of having died in the show's final season) and even Annabeth Gish (Agent Monica Reyes). (No word about Robert Patrick's Agent John Doggett making a surprise cameo, »

- Drew Mackie, @drewgmackie

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From Ryan Reynolds to Kathy Griffin, 15 of Our Favorite X-Files Guest Stars

24 January 2016 10:55 AM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Sunday is the day X-Files diehards have been waiting for: For the first time since 2002, we get to watch new episodes of one of the biggest cult favorite series in TV history. And not only are David Duchovny and Gillian Anderson reprising the roles of Agents Mulder and Scully, but they're bringing with them Mitch Pileggi (Assistant FBI Director Walter Skinner), William B. Davis (the Cigarette Smoking Man), The Lone Gunmen (overcoming the notable handicap of having died in the show's final season) and even Annabeth Gish (Agent Monica Reyes). (No word about Robert Patrick's Agent John Doggett making a surprise cameo, »

- Drew Mackie, @drewgmackie

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Film Review: ‘Band of Robbers’

16 January 2016 1:28 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Sibling filmmakers Adam and Aaron Nee (“The Last Romantic”) offer an appealing mash-up of quirky whimsy, caper-comedy suspense and wink-wink literary allusions in “Band of Robbers,” a modern-day twist on Mark Twain that reimagines Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn as grown-up rascals who never outgrew their appetite for adventure. You don’t really have to be familiar with Twain’s classic novels to enjoy this slickly produced indie as light and likable entertainment. But if you recall the source material as something far more pleasurable than high-school homework, you’re all the more likely to appreciate how cleverly Adam and Aron have played fast and loose with the mythos of Huck and Tom. Theatrical exposure may be fleeting, but extended shelf life in other platforms is a distinct possibility.

In this retelling of Twain’s colorful narratives, Huck (Kyle Gallner) is newly released from prison after serving time for a minor crime, »

- Joe Leydon

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Review: 'Band Of Robbers' Is A Surprising And Absurd Crime Comedy

14 January 2016 2:02 PM, PST | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Wound tight by a killer premise, polished direction, and a tone as though Anton Chigurh sauntered into “Bottle Rocket,” Aaron and Adam Nee’s “Band of Robbers” wrings the anxieties of aging and a dampened imagination from a grown-up Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn. Structuring their modern tale around the Mark Twain narratives, the sibling directors find laughs, pathos, and some surprising storytelling twists, plus have a game cast to deliver it — Kyle Gallner, Stephen Lang, Hannibal Buress, Melissa Benoist, and Eric Christian Olsen. The cast is refreshing for the lack of previously known kinship among them; unlike the Judd Apatow and Paul Feig collectives who deliver and tweak their lineups, there’s something to be said for a new group of comedic and dramatic actors establishing a dynamic. In this case it’s led by Gallner, who plays the straight man Huck Finn to Adam Nee’s deadpan eccentric Tom Sawyer, »

- Charlie Schmidlin

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Wild at Heart: A Week of Debut Films

7 January 2016 9:02 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Happy New Year! We're ushering in the first of January with the first films of some of our favorite filmmakers: a week of debut films!In the Us we're showing Quentin Tarantino's Reservoir Dogs, Todd Haynes' Poison, Stanley Kubrick's Fear and Desire, Alain Robbe-Grillet's L'immortelle, vulgar auteurism mascot Paul W.S. Anderson's Shopping, Wong Kar-wai's As Tears Go By, and Derek Jarman's Sebastiane. In the UK, the lineup features Wes Anderson's Bottle Rocket, Wong's As Tears Go By, Steven Soderbergh's sex, lies and videotape, Michelangelo Antonioni's Story of a Love Affair, Mike Leigh's Bleak Moments, Maurice Pialat's L'enfance nue, and Pedro Costa's O Sangue. »

- Notebook

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The Cinematography of Emmanuel Lubezki: Shaping the Landscape of Modern Film

6 January 2016 10:42 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Emmanuel “Chivo” Lubezki is a brilliant cinematographer whose work has helped shape the landscape of modern cinematic photography. During his 32-year career, Lubezki has worked with such greats as Mike Nichols, Joel and Ethan Coen, Terrence Malick, and Michael Mann, as well as technology-defying directors such as Alfonso Cuarón and Alejandro González Iñárritu. He even worked alongside Martin Scorsese as a camera operator on The Rolling Stones documentary Shine a Light, alongside Robert Richardson.

Lubezki’s latest project reunites him with Iñárritu for a brooding, intense historical epic about fur trapper Hugo Glass. Although the movie itself receives a somewhat mixed reception, Lubezki’s photography alone is worth the price of admission, as we noted in our yearly cinematography wrap-up. Before checking out The Revenant when it opens wide this Friday, we’ve selected some of our favorites in his illustrious filmography, each exquisite in their own unique ways. Please enjoy below, »

- Tony Hinds

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006

18 items from 2016


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