Jim Profit works for a multinational company, and isn't above using any means necessary to get ahead, and that includes bribery, blackmail, intimidation, extortion, and even murder. Now ... See full summary »
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1  
1997   1996  
1 nomination. See more awards »
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Cast

Series cast summary:
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 Pete Gracen 8 episodes, 1996-1997
Allison Hossack ...
 Nora Gracen 8 episodes, 1996-1997
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 Joanne Meltzer 8 episodes, 1996-1997
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 Jeffrey Sykes 7 episodes, 1996-1997
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Storyline

Jim Profit works for a multinational company, and isn't above using any means necessary to get ahead, and that includes bribery, blackmail, intimidation, extortion, and even murder. Now everyone at the company, including the president, Charles Gracen are oblivious to his dark side, as a matter of fact, Gracen thinks of him as a golden boy. But Joanne Meltzer, the company's security chief looks into his eyes, she sees something sinister. And when her boss, Jack Walters is looking into some irregularities at the company, he asks Joanne to look into and initially, the person she cornered said it was Profit who was behind it, but when Profit learned of this, he convinced this person to change the story she told Joanne. But Joanne knows that Profit is evil and so she tries to get the goods on him, at the same time, Profit tries to find a way to neutralize her and anyone else who might believe her. Written by <rcs0411@yahoo.com>

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Taglines:

A Name You Can't Trust See more »

Genres:

Drama

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Release Date:

8 April 1996 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Jim Profit  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

(7 episodes) | (pilot)

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Series creators David Greenwalt and John McNamara state in the Kills featurette on the 2005 DVD releases, Profit's traumatic upbringing was based on the childhood of a real-life serial killer who had been similarly raised in a box with only a television present as described in the nonfiction novel Whoever Fights Monsters: My Twenty Years Tracking Serial Killers for the FBI by Robert K. Ressler & Tom Shachtman. The relevant passage is located in Chapter 4 titled Childhoods of Violence: "One woman propped her infant son in a cardboard box in front of the television set, and left for work; later, she'd put him in a playpen, toss in some food, and let the TV set be the baby-sitter until she came home again." See more »

Quotes

Jim Profit: [voice-over] We must welcome adversity and embrace struggle. And no matter what we get from life, never give less than 100%. Of course at the end of every battle-weary day, we fold ourselves into peaceful darkness and find comfort in those gentle words -
[spoken]
Jim Profit: good night.
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Connections

Referenced in Cement (2000) See more »

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User Reviews

 
The Very Best, Ever
27 June 2002 | by (The Hague, The Netherlands) – See all my reviews

Could PROFIT be the greatest TV series ever made? I think it comes close. This series is Machiavelli brought to life in the corporate world of today. Great acting, great story lines, great production values made this a TV series that is unparalleled. Made in 1996, before the rise of internet entrepreneurs, before the last leg of the bull market, before the BBC caught on that there was something brewing in Silicon Valley, this series was years ahead of it's time.

There are detective series with less complex story lines than any of the six episodes that were made for this gem. This series stood out because of the total lack of remorse from the lead character, his cunning and intelligence and his single minded ambition. At the heart of it, there is the fantastic looking Adrian Pasdar (Near Dark) as Jim Profit, the ultimate psychopath/sociopath and extremely ambitious yuppie, but Lisa Zane, Sherman Augustus, Allison Hossack, Lisa Blount as Profit's breathless secretary and Keith Szarabajka (Mickey from The Equalizer) all more than hold up their ends. I wish they would pick up this series again, especially after the late nineties era with Enron, Worldcom, etc. As it was only made 7 years ago, the cast couldn't have aged that much.


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