"Our Friends in the North"
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany creditsepisode listepisodes castepisode ratings... by rating... by votes
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratings
Plot & Quotes
plot summaryplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb



2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

12 items from 2012


David Mitchell and Robert Webb: fear and loathing in Croydon

18 November 2012 4:00 PM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

As Peep Show returns, David Mitchell and Robert Webb talk to Tara Conlan about the cast's new agonies, their own doubts over Sky's commitment to the arts – and why comedy outranks drama

Sitting forward in an earnest fashion and pushing back his flop of brown hair, David Mitchell is explaining why the production company he has just formed with Robert Webb has gone into business with the BBC. At a time when a growing number of comedians, including Steve Coogan, Julia Davis and Chris O'Dowd, have been beating a path to Sky, it's a bold move from the stars of cult hit Peep Show.

"Sky is making a lot of comedy at the moment, and that's great," says Mitchell. "It's always good to have more choice for pitching ideas and more choices for the viewer. But my worry is that that money could be turned off in a second if »

- Tara Conlan

Permalink | Report a problem


James Bond Retrospective: Casino Royale (2006)

3 October 2012 3:32 AM, PDT | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

(This article contains spoilers)

To mark the 50th Anniversary of one of the most successful movie franchises of all time and with James Bond’s 23rd official outing in Skyfall due for release later this month, I have been tasked with taking a retrospective look at the films that turned author Ian Fleming’s creation into one of the most recognised and iconic characters in film history.

After 2002’s Die Another Day, there was a general feeling that the Bond series had run its course. After 40 years and twenty films, the character had become far removed from Fleming’s original novels and taken on a life of its own relying on sci-fi gadgetry and computer generated thrills in stories that were becoming predictably formulaic. Bond had survived numerous revisions over the years but when a film adaptation of Robert Ludlum’s book The Bourne Identity was released in 2002 just months before Die Another Day, »

- Chris Wright

Permalink | Report a problem


Lord Fellowes | MediaGuardian 100 2012

16 September 2012 4:10 PM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

With Downton Abbey returning for a third series with 16 Emmy nominations, it's easy to forgive its creator's Titanic flop

Job: writer, actor, director

Age: 63

Industry: broadcasting

2011 ranking: 78

Lord Fellowes's ITV1 drama Titanic sank with all hands. But the new series of Downton Abbey looks like a return to form.

Starring Hugh Bonneville and Dame Maggie Smith, and with Shirley MacLaine joining the cast for its third outing, Downton Abbey is one of ITV's most reliable hits – up there with The X Factor and Britain's Got Talent – and when it was shown in the Us scooped more nominations at the Emmys than any other British TV show in history.

As well as being the nation's foremost contemporary chronicler of the English landed gentry, Fellowes cuts the mustard as an actor (Monarch of the Glen, Our Friends in the North), screenwriter (Young Victoria and The Tourist, although perhaps the less said »

Permalink | Report a problem


'Doctor Who': David Bradley hints at 'space pirate' role

26 July 2012 3:53 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

David Bradley has revealed new details about his role on Doctor Who. The Harry Potter actor will appear in the sci-fi drama's seventh series, as first announced in February. "He is a space pirate," Bradley told the Warwick University podcast of his character Solomon. "We've modelled [him] on a well-known nightclub owner with long hair. He has lots of scars [and] he wears black leather." Bradley - who has also appeared on Game of Thrones and Our Friends in the North - went on to describe Solomon as "like an (more) »

- By Morgan Jeffery

Permalink | Report a problem


Six to watch: British miniseries

25 July 2012 7:16 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

From man-eating plants to dulcet-toned detectives, we run down the UK's great short TV series. What have we missed?

They say good things come in small packages – and while longform storytelling and slowburn plotlines can make for thrilling television, a strong miniseries has an appeal of its own. Short, sharp and crammed full of quality, they're something the British do incredibly well.

So which make our shortlist? For the purpose of this piece we're classifying miniseries as singular stories told across a limited number of episodes; that means there's no spot for Sherlock but still plenty of room for everything from man-eating plants to dulcet-toned detectives. So join us as we look through some of the best British miniseries, shows that have left a big imprint despite their small number of episodes.

Have we included your favourite or made a glaring omission from the list? Let us know in the comments below. »

- Daniel Bettridge

Permalink | Report a problem


TV review: Blackout; Jamie's Summer Food Rave Up

2 July 2012 4:00 PM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

He's a corrupt drunkard who may have murdered someone. Just the man for mayor, then

'You're scaring me with that look," said Christopher Eccleston's son in Blackout (BBC1). You'd have thought the boy would have got used to it by now. Christopher Eccleston only has one look: pinched, so woundedly feral he makes Robert De Niro look house-trained, so intense that he could face down anybody, perhaps even God.

To his immense credit, Eccleston works that one look without trying another.

The results of doing otherwise can be catastrophic. Take the case of Roy Keane. There was a moment during Euro 2012 when Adrian Chiles made a half-time joke and Chiles, Gareth Southgate and Patrice Evra chuckled amiably. Then something happened. Roy Keane tried to smile. Small children and horses the world over are still in blankets being comforted by the emergency services or trying to get closure through grief counselling over that one. »

- Stuart Jeffries

Permalink | Report a problem


Christopher Eccleston: from superheroes to Sophocles

28 June 2012 2:25 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

For Christopher Eccleston, small is always beautiful, whether it be TV thriller Blackout or Greek tragedy Antigone on the stage. He reveals why making films just doesn't compare

He strides across the polished tiled floor, past imposing columns and heavy, intricately carved doors. Outside, the Manchester winds are furiously buffeting the redbrick walls of this grand, turn-of-the-last-century university hall. There seems nowhere more appropriate to meet Christopher Eccleston: he has a face to fit buildings like this, an on-screen intensity that is the match of the architecture. But even so, his latest TV role looks set to stretch him: an unflinching, uncomfortable, three-hour examination of addiction and corruption, in which Eccleston goes from rock bottom to hero, as Manchester politician Daniel Demoys.

Written by Bill Gallagher, who adapted Lark Rise to Candleford for the small screen, Blackout puts alcoholism under the microscope in the course of its three episodes. »

- Vicky Frost

Permalink | Report a problem


Christopher Eccleston: from superheroes to Sophocles

27 June 2012 4:00 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

For Christopher Eccleston, small is always beautiful, whether it be TV thriller Blackout or Greek tragedy Antigone on the stage. He reveals why making films just doesn't compare

He strides across the polished tiled floor, past imposing columns and heavy, intricately carved doors. Outside, the Manchester winds are furiously buffeting the redbrick walls of this grand, turn-of-the-last-century university hall. There seems nowhere more appropriate to meet Christopher Eccleston: he has a face to fit buildings like this, an on-screen intensity that is the match of the architecture. But even so, his latest TV role looks set to stretch him: an unflinching, uncomfortable, three-hour examination of addiction and corruption, in which Eccleston goes from rock bottom to hero, as Manchester politician Daniel Demoys.

Written by Bill Gallagher, who adapted Lark Rise to Candleford for the small screen, Blackout puts alcoholism under the microscope in the course of its three episodes. »

- Vicky Frost

Permalink | Report a problem


Have you been watching… White Heat?

5 April 2012 3:51 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Despite clunky dialogue and obvious characters, top acting and a mysterious death mean I keep coming back to the BBC2 drama

It was always going to be a tough pitch, selling a BBC2 drama spanning the last four decades of the 20th century when Our Friends in the North, a BBC2 drama spanning the last four decades of the 20th century, made such an impact on the TV landscape in the mid-90s. So White Heat, which follows the story of seven flat-sharers from 60s London until the present day, had its work cut out from the off.

We start in 2012, where six middle-aged former flatmates meet to divide the effects of the seventh who has recently died. (We don't discover who until the final episode.) The cast includes the cream of two generations of British acting talent: Claire Foy and Sam Claflin lead the young cast; Juliet Stephenson, Lindsay Duncan »

- Julia Raeside

Permalink | Report a problem


Rev reigns at Broadcasting Press Guild awards

30 March 2012 4:15 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

BBC2 sitcom scoops four prizes including two for Olivia Colman, as ITV1 drama Appropriate Adult wins two prizes

BBC2 sitcom Rev will sweep the board at this year's Broadcasting Press Guild awards with four prizes including two for one of its stars, Olivia Colman.

The Tom Hollander comedy about the exploits of east London vicar Adam Smallbone will pick up four awards at the ceremony on Friday lunchtime, including the best comedy/entertainment prize, the writer's award (for Hollander and James Wood) and the best actress and breakthrough awards won by Colman.

Colman, who plays the vicar's wife Alex Smallbone in Rev, will also be recognised for her role as Nancy Ronstadt in BBC1 drama Exile.

It is rare but not entirely unprecedented for a single programme to pick up four Bpg awards, which are now into their 38th year. Previous four-gong winners include acclaimed BBC2 drama Our Friends In The North. »

- John Plunkett

Permalink | Report a problem


White Heat: behind the scenes on the BBC2 drama

15 March 2012 5:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Emine Saner meets the flatmates at the centre of White Heat, Paula Milne's 1960s drama for BBC2

Everything on set is quiet except for a plink-plink-plink sound. "This is a carpet warehouse," explains Elinor Day, the producer. "The rain comes in, but whenever they fix it, it finds somewhere else to come in." It is one of those days when it doesn't feel as if the rain will ever stop.

The actors are hurried from the vast warehouse, where the sets have been built, to their trailers in the car park under huge umbrellas. A great puddle has formed in front of the catering truck and members of the film crew and extras line up to take their turn leaping over it to get to the double decker bus where they eat their lunch behind the steamed-up windows.

The first episode of White Heat was broadcast last week and »

- Emine Saner

Permalink | Report a problem


White Heat: 'What women went through in the 60s was seismic'

2 March 2012 4:08 PM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Screenwriter Paula Milne says her own experiences inspired the new BBC2 drama about a group of people through the decades

Sixteen years ago, BBC2 broadcast Our Friends in the North, a much lauded tale of four friends and social and political change that began in the 60s. Next week the channel will attempt a similar feat with White Heat.

Kicking off in 1965, the drama focuses on a group of flatmates as they move through the decades to the present day. With acclaimed screenwriter Paula Milne behind the scripts, it is perhaps little wonder the drama is being thought of as Our Friends in the South.

"As a woman, this piece is semi-autobiographical – so that is what you see on screen," said Milne. "The inevitable comparison is with Our Friends in the North, and that is a brilliant drama and showed the audience is interested in long television stories. But it »

- Vicky Frost

Permalink | Report a problem


2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

12 items from 2012


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners