To vlemma tou Odyssea
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb


News for
Ulysses' Gaze (1995) More at IMDbPro »To vlemma tou Odyssea (original title)


2012 | 2011 | 2009 | 2008

15 items from 2012


Erland Josephson, 1923 - 2012

29 February 2012 1:31 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

"Swedish actor Erland Josephson, who collaborated with legendary film director Ingmar Bergman in more than 40 films and plays, has died," reports the AP. He was 88. "Josephson was born in Stockholm in 1923 and met Bergman while training as an amateur actor at 16. He appeared in several Bergman plays and films. He shot to international stardom with the role of Johan in Berman's film Scenes from a Marriage, in 1973. Josephson also starred in Andrey Tarkovskiy's films Nostalghia [1983] and The Sacrifice [1986]."

"It is Josephson's face which makes him so effective on film," reads his entry in the International Dictionary of Films and Filmmakers, "that bearlike aspect, his ability to look lost and forlorn, to convey a sense of suffering and bewilderment, in spite of his bluff exterior. Were one to repeat Kuleshov's famous experiment of the 1920s and to intercut the same shot of Josephson with images of joy, of sadness, of anger, »

Permalink | Report a problem


Oscars 2012: In memoriam - Academy pays tribute to Elizabeth Taylor among others

27 February 2012 1:56 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The screen icon and two-time Oscar winner heads the list of stars who died this year in the Academy's traditional rememberance

Elizabeth Taylor featured prominently in the In Memoriam section of the Academy Award ceremony currently taking place at the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood. The Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf actor died in March 2011 aged 79, and was one of the most prominent figures of Hollywood glamour through the 1950s and 60s. She is especially well remembered for her multiple marriages, including two to fellow actor Richard Burton.

Also remembered were actors Jane Russell, best known for starring opposite Marilyn Monroe in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes; Farley Granger, the star of two Hitchcock masterpieces, Rope and Strangers on a Train; and Michael Gough, the veteran British character actor who had a late flowering as the butler Alfred in the Batman films in the 90s.

Behind the camera, mentions were made of director Sidney Lumet, »

Permalink | Report a problem


Erland Josephson obituary

26 February 2012 4:06 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Swedish actor known for his roles in Ingmar Bergman's films and television dramas

Although the actors who comprised Ingmar Bergman's repertory company all went on to make their own prestigious careers, they will for ever be associated with the great Swedish film and stage director. Erland Josephson, who has died aged 88 after suffering from Parkinson's disease, was artistically linked with Bergman even more than Max Von Sydow, Liv Ullmann and Ingrid Thulin. Josephson appeared in more than a dozen of Bergman's films, and played a Bergman surrogate in Ullmann's Faithless (2000).

In middle and old age, he was chosen by directors such as Andrei Tarkovsky and Theo Angelopoulos for the qualities he revealed in the Bergman films – a certain self-centred introspection and a deep melancholy, etched on his lined and grizzled features. Because he became a leading film actor in his 50s, he seems never to have been young. »

- Ronald Bergan

Permalink | Report a problem


Erland Josephson obituary

26 February 2012 4:06 PM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Swedish actor known for his roles in Ingmar Bergman's films and television dramas

Although the actors who comprised Ingmar Bergman's repertory company all went on to make their own prestigious careers, they will for ever be associated with the great Swedish film and stage director. Erland Josephson, who has died aged 88 after suffering from Parkinson's disease, was artistically linked with Bergman even more than Max Von Sydow, Liv Ullmann and Ingrid Thulin. Josephson appeared in more than a dozen of Bergman's films, and played a Bergman surrogate in Ullmann's Faithless (2000).

In middle and old age, he was chosen by directors such as Andrei Tarkovsky and Theo Angelopoulos for the qualities he revealed in the Bergman films – a certain self-centred introspection and a deep melancholy, etched on his lined and grizzled features. Because he became a leading film actor in his 50s, he seems never to have been young. »

- Ronald Bergan

Permalink | Report a problem


Theo Angelopoulos

26 January 2012 2:06 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Film director with a magisterial style who excelled at historical and political allegories

The Greek film director Theo Angelopoulos, who has died aged 76 in a road accident, was an epic poet of the cinema, creating allegories of 20th-century Greek history and politics. He redefined the slow pan, the long take and tracking shots, of which he was a master. His stately, magisterial style and languidly unfolding narratives require some (ultimately rewarding) effort on the part of the spectator. "The sequence shot offers, as far as I'm concerned, much more freedom," Angelopoulos explained. "By refusing to cut in the middle, I invite the spectator to better analyse the image I show him, and to focus, time and again, on the elements that he feels are the most significant in it."

Angelopoulos was born in Athens, where he studied law. After military service, he went to Paris to attend the Sorbonne but »

- Ronald Bergan

Permalink | Report a problem


Theo Angelopoulos: a career in clips

25 January 2012 4:25 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Greek director Theo Angelopoulos has died in a road accident aged 76. Here we look back at his body of work, which included The Travelling Players, Ulysses Gaze and Landscape in the Mist

The Travelling Players (1975)

Theo Angelopoulos's breakthrough film is a political allegory in disguise; a leftist analysis of democracy, fascism and national identity, shrewdly gussied up as the tale of a theatre tour through the Greek provinces and shot under the noses of the country's military junta. Rigorous, spartan, and yet brimming over with pungent mythic allusions, The Travelling Players established its creator as one of the most distinctive European directors of his generation.

Landscape in the Mist (1988)

The director hit the road again with this stark, soulful tale of two runaways in search of their missing father. The way ahead leads through misty towns and snowy wilderness, while the early social-realist air tilts, by degrees, towards surrealism. »

- Xan Brooks

Permalink | Report a problem


Theo Angelopoulos: one last unfinished tale for chronicler of modern Greece

25 January 2012 3:35 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Incompleteness was a recurrent theme for a film-maker who thought closure out of reach, always searching for the lost idyll of a nation torn apart by the 20th century

Theo Angelopoulos has been killed in a traffic accident while crossing a busy street in the middle of filming. This very fact has an enormous irony and poignancy: so much of his work is about the unfinished story, the unfinished journey, the unfinished life, and the realisation that to be unfinished is itself part of the human mystery and an essential human birthright and burden. This was part of what he conveyed to audiences, in a cinematic style that was poetry and epic poetry, steeped in the tumult of Greek history from the time of the second world war, and yet his movies were anything but frenzied or dramatic. They addressed not history's surface action but its spiritual causes and effects; he created long, »

- Peter Bradshaw

Permalink | Report a problem


Greek film-maker Theo Angelopoulos dies after road accident

25 January 2012 2:38 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Celebrated director was shooting new film The Other Sea when he was hit by a motorcycle, sustaining serious head injuries

Multi-award-winning Greek film-maker Theo Angelopoulos died last night, aged 76, after a road accident in the port town of Piraeus, just outside Athens. Angelopoulos was working on a new film, The Other Sea, when he was hit by a motorcycle and sustained serious head injuries. He died later in hospital.

The Other Sea, which was to star Italian actor Toni Servillo (The Consequences of Love), was Angelopoulos's first film since 2008's The Dust of Time, and was a study of the political and social turmoil currently affecting Greece. In this it was in keeping with his previous oeuvre, which was marked by an engagement with Greece's turbulent 20th-century history, along with its complex, dreamlike imagery.

Angelopoulos first made his name internationally with the 1975 film The Travelling Players, made during the colonels' military rule but released after. »

- Andrew Pulver

Permalink | Report a problem


Greek Filmmaker Angelopoulos Killed In Accident

24 January 2012 5:31 PM, PST | WENN | See recent WENN news »

Legendary Greek filmmaker Theodoros Angelopoulos has died after suffering serious injuries in a road accident on Tuesday.

The director, 76, was crossing a road in Athens when he was knocked over by a motorcyclist. He sustained severe head injuries and died in a nearby hospital.

Angelopoulos began his career in 1968 and he enjoyed success as a director, producer and screenwriter for more than four decades.

He became known for his work on political Greek films Days of '36, The Hunters and The Travelling Players, which landed him a string of European awards including Best Film of the Year by the British Film Institute.

His other works include Voyage to Cythera, Ulysses' Gaze and Landscape in the Mist, which scored him the Silver Lion Award for Best Director at 1988's Venice Film Festival in Italy. A decade later, Angelopoulos won the prestigious Palme d'Or award at the Cannes Film Festival for Eternity and a Day. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Ulysses Gaze Review: Flawed Screenplay, Magnificently Effective Score

24 January 2012 4:31 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Ulysses Gaze Review Pt.2: Harvey Keitel, Erland Josephson, Maia Morgenstern Ulysses' Gaze ends with his soliloquy of grief. The character's despair, even though he is now in sole possession of the reels, suggests that his real interest was never the old film footage. How it ties in to his own quest for past memories is uncertain. In fact, there is an air of self-delusion and disingenuity in his grief. As a performer, Harvey Keitel seems to be dreamily floating throughout much of the film. This approach mostly works, save for a few much too florid speeches. Erland Josephson seems a bit hyperactive as the historian, while Maia Morgenstern gives perhaps the film's finest performance — or rather, performances — even if some of the roles seem a bit too far out. Ulysses' Gaze also offers a magnificently effective score by Eleni Karaindrou, especially with great viola passages by Kim Kashkashian, which »

- Dan Schneider

Permalink | Report a problem


Ulysses Gaze Review: Harvey Keitel, Erland Josephson, Maia Morgenstern

24 January 2012 4:30 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Ulysses Gaze Review Pt.1: d: Theo Angelopoulos That scene also probes one of the unspoken mysteries of the Harvey Keitel character: his relationship with assorted women, which seems to emanate from a rupture with his mother. Early on in the film, Keitel encounters a Greek film historian with whom he seemingly has an affair. Then, he becomes the lover of a war widow (recall, this is the mid-1990s Balkans), who conflates him with her dead husband. Finally, he seems to connect with the daughter of Sarajevo's local film archivist, Ivo Levy (Erland Josephson), who got possession of the three lost reels some years earlier, but could not get the right chemicals to develop them. (Josephson was a replacement for Gian Maria Volonté, who died during filming.) Yet, it is not certain how much of what happens with the archivist's daughter takes place in the film's inner reality or within Keitel's fantasies, »

- Dan Schneider

Permalink | Report a problem


Ulysses Gaze Review: d: Theo Angelopoulos

24 January 2012 4:29 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

To Vlemma Tou Odyssea / Ulysses' Gaze (1995) Direction: Theo Angelopoulos Cast: Harvey Keitel, Erland Josephson, Maia Morgenstern, Thanasis Vengos, Giorgos Mihalakopoulos Screenplay: Theo Angelopoulos, Tonino Guerra, Petros Markaris, Giorgio Silvagni Harvey Keitel, Ulysses' Gaze Greek filmmaker Theo Angelopoulos' 1995 effort To Vlemma tou Odyssea / Ulysses' Gaze is the first of that director's four films that I have seen that is not unequivocally a great work of art. Although there are arguments that can be made in favor of that claim, the film's 173-minute running time is much too long, especially considering that Ulysses' Gaze is the least poetic of the aforementioned four films. (For the record, the others are Landscape in the Mist, Eternity and a Day, and Trilogy: The Weeping Meadow.) Of course, I'm not saying that Ulysses' Gaze is a bad film or that it lacks Angelopoulos' trademark visual poesy. On the other hand, the film lacks several important »

- Dan Schneider

Permalink | Report a problem


Theo Angelopoulos, 1935-2012

24 January 2012 3:45 PM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Just ten days ago, we were pointing to an interview in which a lively-sounding Theo Angelopoulos was telling David Jenkins in Sight & Sound about his plans for his next film, The Other Sea. Now word comes via, among others, Kevin Jagernauth at the Playlist that the 77-year-old filmmaker was struck by a motorcycle near the set not far from Athens' main port of Piraeus and has died of his injuries. At the moment, the AP has only a few other details on the accident.

Acquarello in Senses of Cinema in 2003: "From the absence of the conventional word 'End' at the conclusion of his films to his penchant for interweaving variations of episodes from his earlier films (which, in turn, are often culled from personal experience) to create interconnected 'chapters' of a continuous, unfinished work, Angelopoulos's cinema is both intimately autobiographical and culturally allegorical and, like the children of Landscape »

Permalink | Report a problem


Filmmaker Theo Angelopoulos dies in accident

24 January 2012 3:42 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Greek filmmaker known for his slow and dreamlike style was killed in a road accident while working on his latest movie

Theo Angelopoulos, an award-winning Greek filmmaker known for his slow and dreamlike style as a director, has been killed in a road accident while working on his latest movie. He was 76.

Police and hospital officials said Angelopoulos suffered serious head injuries and died at a hospital after being hit by a motorcycle while walking across a road near a movie set near Athens' main port of Piraeus.

The driver, also injured and hospitalised, was later identified as an off-duty police officer.

The accident occurred while Angelopoulos was working on his upcoming movie "The Other Sea."

Angelopoulos had won numerous awards for his movies, mostly at European film festivals, during a career that spanned more than 40 years.

In 1995, he won the Grand Jury Prize at the Cannes Film Festival for "Ulysses' Gaze, »

Permalink | Report a problem


Theo Angelopoulos Dead After Being Hit by Motorcycle: Landscape In The Mist, Eternity And A Day

24 January 2012 2:47 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Greek filmmaker Theo Angelopoulos died earlier today at a hospital near Athens. Angelopoulos had suffered serious head injuries after being hit by a motorcycle while crossing a road. He was 76. [Addendum: Angelopoulos died while filming The Other Sea, the third installment in a trilogy initiated with The Weeping Meadow and The Dust of Time (see below).] Known for his deliberately paced, dreamlike films, Angelopoulos and his movies won a number of awards from critics and at film festivals around the world. In 1995, for instance, Angelopoulos' Ulysses' Gaze won the Grand Jury Prize at the Cannes Film Festival. Upon receiving his runner-up award, a none-too-pleased Angelopoulos' told those in attendance: "If this is what you have to give me, I have nothing to say." He then walked off without bothering to pose for photographers. Having learned their lesson, three years later Cannes' jurors gave Angelopoulos' the Palme d'Or for Eternity and a Day. Among Angelopoulos' other films are Voyage to Cythera,, Days of 36, The Travelling Players, and the slow-moving but unbelievably beautiful Landscape in the Mist. »

- Andre Soares

Permalink | Report a problem


2012 | 2011 | 2009 | 2008

15 items from 2012


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners