Unzipped (1995) - News Poster

(1995)

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Doc Corner: 'House of Z'

Fashion documentaries have been going downhill ever since Unzipped. Douglas Keeve’s 1995 portrait of Isaac Mizrahi, a box office smash and critical hit, remains the pinnacle of what so many since have attempted. Like Madonna: Truth or Dare, from which it took much inspiration, that riotously funny glimpse into Mizrahi’s world full of design, famous friends, creativity and wickedly self-depreciating neurosis was a perfect storm of sorts between personality, fashion and celebrity that a film about this sort of person ought to be.

Every year brings us several of these sorts of documentaries. Like the majority of them, Sandy Chronopoulos’ debut feature, House of Z, is easily digestible and barely raises a sweat; a work of celebrity portraiture that fans won’t regret watching, but which offers little beyond what is promised on the tin. Taking the same narrative hook as Unzipped of a talented young designer’s comeback
See full article at FilmExperience »

We Tried It: Kim Kardashian's $3,000+ Beauty Routine Changed My Skin Forever

We Tried It: Kim Kardashian's $3,000+ Beauty Routine Changed My Skin Forever
What It Is: As someone who works in beauty, new products are constantly hitting my desk, which means my routine doesn’t ever stay the same for too long. But in an effort to live like Kim Kardashian, I swapped out everything — and I mean everything — in my regimen so I could mimic the Kkw Beauty mogul’s routine for a few weeks.

Who Tried It: Kaitlyn Frey, Style & Beauty Assistant and Kardashian superfan

Why We Tried It: I love the Kardashians, and I’m willing to try anything that makes me feel like like the 6th member of the KarJenner sister squad.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Mary Tyler Moore Remembered: She Made It, After All

  • The Wrap
Mary Tyler Moore Remembered: She Made It, After All
“Because I’m American, and I’m not a stone. That’s why I like Mary Tyler Moore. Basically because I think, between her and Jackie Kennedy, they shaped this country. … Between Laura Petrie and Mary Richards, it’s what shaped America’s whole taste level.” — designer Isaac Mizrahi in the documentary “Unzipped” Everyone knows that Mary Tyler Moore pulled off that rarest of TV feats, hopping from one hugely popular, universally acclaimed landmark sitcom, “The Dick Van Dyke Show” (1961-1966), to another, “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” (1970-1977). But people rarely discuss that period in between, in which her career was anything but.
See full article at The Wrap »

‘The Devil Wears Prada’ At 10: Meryl Streep and More on How Their Risky Project Became a Massive Hit

Ten years ago, “The Devil Wears Prada” surprised even the people that made it. The movie opened over the July 4th weekend in 2006 as a counter-programmer aimed primarily at women. But it played far broader than that, all over the world. Based on the bestseller written by Lauren Weisberger, the ex-Vogue assistant to editor-in-chief Anna Wintour, it was an anomaly that influenced movies to come but remained a rare bird, hard to categorize or imitate.

It wasn’t a standard-issue studio genre, neither a romantic comedy centered around a young woman’s choice of mate, a biopic, nor a revenge plot. Aspiring young assistant Andy (Anne Hathaway) and her powerful editrix boss Miranda (Meryl Streep) were dual protagonists in a coming-of-age workplace fairy tale about the trials of a first job and finding your identity.

The other players behind the $41-million film, which shot over 57 days in New York and
See full article at Indiewire »

‘The Devil Wears Prada’ At 10: Meryl Streep and More on How Their Risky Project Became a Massive Hit

Ten years ago, “The Devil Wears Prada” surprised even the people that made it. The movie opened over the July 4th weekend in 2006 as a counter-programmer aimed primarily at women. But it played far broader than that, all over the world. Based on the bestseller written by Lauren Weisberger, the ex-Vogue assistant to editor-in-chief Anna Wintour, it was an anomaly that influenced movies to come but remained a rare bird, hard to categorize or imitate.

It wasn’t a standard-issue studio genre, neither a romantic comedy centered around a young woman’s choice of mate, a biopic, nor a revenge plot. Aspiring young assistant Andy (Anne Hathaway) and her powerful editrix boss Miranda (Meryl Streep) were dual protagonists in a coming-of-age workplace fairy tale about the trials of a first job and finding your identity.

The other players behind the $41-million film, which shot over 57 days in New York and
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Fashion on Film: Get Ready for New York Fashion Week By Watching These Documentaries

  • Indiewire
The who's who of the fashion industry will descend upon Lincoln Center for Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week starting today. If you can't make the runway shows yourself, take a look at Indiewire's latest selections for Hulu's Documentaries page - a series of films examining the world of fashion.  Watch these and other fashion-focused docs now for free!James Belzer's "The Tents" provides a history of New York Fashion Week, featuring organizers, designers, fashion editors, and publicists before the event transitioned from its previous home in Bryant Park. A number of films take the viewer behind the scenes as designers prepare their latest collections: Matt Tyrnauer's acclaimed "Valentino: The Last Emperor"profiles the legendary designer; Douglas Keeve's "Unzipped" heads back in time, as Isaac Mizrahi plans his Fall 1994 line; "Craeft - Ports 1961 - New York Fashion Week / Fall 2010" details the hurdles between designer Tia Cibani and her Bryant Park runway show; and.
See full article at Indiewire »

LatinoBuzz: The Winners of the 3rd Annual Cinema Tropical Awards Are...

The winners of the 3rd Annual Cinema Tropical Awards were announced at a special event at the New York Times headquarters in New York City,celebrating the best of the Latin American film production of the year in five different categories:

- Best Feature Film

- Best Documentary Film

- Best Director, Feature Film

- Best Director, Documentary Film

- Best First Film

The Cinema Tropical Awards are presented in partnership with Voces, Latino Heritage Network of The New York Times and 92YTribeca, with the support of the Mexican Cultural Institute. Special thanks to Lucila Moctezuma and Mario Díaz.

Best Feature Film

- O Som Ao Redor / Neighboring Sounds (Kleber Mendonça Filho, Brazil, 2012)

Best Director, Feature Film

- MatÍAs Meyer, Los ÚLtimos Cristeros / The Last Christeros (Mexico, 2011)

Best Documentary Film

- El Salvavidas / The Lifeguard (Maite Alberdi, Chile, 2011)

Best Director, Documentary Film

- JosÉ ÁLvarez, CanÍCula (Mexico, 2011)

Best First Film

- El Estudiante / The Student (Santiago Mitre, Argentina, 2011)

The films were selected from a list of Latin American feature films with a minimum of 60 minutes in length that were premiered between April 1, 2011 and March 31, 2012. The winners and final nominees were selected by a six-member jury panel from a list of fiction and documentary films compiled from the selections of a nominating committee composed of 14 film professionals from Latin America, the U.S. and Europe (see list below).

Fiction Jury

Dennis Lim writes about film and popular culture for various publications including The New York Times and the Los Angeles Times. He is the founding editor of Moving Image Source, the online publication and research resource of the Museum of the Moving Image and was formerly the film editor of The Village Voice. His work has also appeared in The Believer, The Oxford American, Blender, Spin, Espous, Indiewire, New York Daily News, The Independent on Sunday, The Guardian, and the film quarterly Cinema Scope, where he is a contributing editor. A member of the National Society of Film Critics and the editor of The Village Voice Film Guide (2006), he has served as a member of the New York Film Festival selection committee and he teaches in the Cultural Reporting and Criticism graduate program a New York University.

Matías Piñeiro is a filmmaker and professor at the Universidad del Cine in Buenos Aires. His first feature-length work, El hombre robado / The Stolen Man (2007), won awards at the Jeonju International Film Festival and at Las Palmas de Gran Canaria International Film Festival. In 2009, his second feature, Todos mienten / They All Lie, premiered at Bafici (Buenos Aires Festival International de Cine Independiente), where it won two awards. It also won a prize at the Santiago Festival Internacional de Cine. In 2010, he was selected—along with James Benning and Denis Côté—to screen his third film, Rosalinda at the 11th Jeonju Digital Project. Piñeiro recently premiered his most recent film, Viola, at the Toronto Film Festival, and it's slated for a Us release in 2013. He earned a filmmaking degree from Universidad del Cine. His award-winning films have been screened around the world, including at Anthology Film Archives, Festival des 3 Continents, the Festival del film Locarno, the London Film Festival, Museo de Arte Latinoamericano de Buenos Aires, the Museum of Modern Art, Rencontré Cinémas d’Amerique Latine de Toulouse, and the Viennale.

Frida Torresblanco served as a producer in Spain working on film including The Dancer Upstairs, directed by John Malkovich and starring Javier Bardem, as well as Susan Seidelman’s Gaudi Afternoon. She moved to New York City in 2002 to launch and lead Alfonso Cuaron’s film production company, Esperanto, where she served as Executive Producer and Creative On-Set Producer for The Assassination of Richard Nixon (directed by Niels Mueller, starring Sean Penn), among others. In 2006, Frida joined Alfonso Cuarón and Guillermo del Toro to produce El laberinto del Fauno / Pan’s Labyrinth (Three Oscars & another three Oscar nominations; three wins & five BAFTA nominations; a nomination for the Palm d’Or and a Golden Globe). The Hollywood Reporter named Frida one of the 50 most powerful Latinos in Hollywood. She also produced Rudo y Cursi (directed by Carlos Cuarón, starring Gael García Bernal and Diego Luna). In 2010, Frida launched her new film production company, Braven Films, with partners Eric Laufer and Giovanna Randall. Her next project, Magic Magic, produced through Braven Films, will star Michael Cera, Juno Temple and Emily Browning.

DocuMentary Jury

Ryan Harrington is the Director of Documentary Programs at the Tribeca Film Institute where he oversees the Gucci Tribeca Documentary Fund, the Tfi Documentary Fund, Tribeca All Access documentary program and the Latin America Media Arts Fund while developing other initiatives and programs that support non-fiction filmmaking. Recent Tfi successes include Give Up Tomorrow, If a Tree Falls, The Redemption of General Butt Naked, The Oath, Enemies of the People, Marathon Boy and Donor Unknown. Independently he is currently working on the feature doc Hungry in America, with filmmakers Kristi Jacobson & Lori Silverbush and Participant Media, that explores why so many people in the USA go without food, and what can be done about it. Harrington managed production for A&E IndieFilms, the theatrical documentary arm of the A&E Network, for four years. Throughout his time there he championed the Oscar-nominated films Murderball and Jesus Camp, and the Sundance hits My Kid Could Paint That and American Teen.

Paula Heredia is a director and editor based in New York. She was awarded an Emmy for the HBO documentary In Memoriam, NYC 9/11/01, and an Ace Eddie Award for the acclaimed documentary Unzipped. Her directorial work includes the documentaries George Plimpton and the Paris Review, Ralph Gibson, and The Couple in the Cage. Her dramatic work includes Having a Baby, Tras La Ventana, Slings and Arrows, and La Cena de Matrimonio. Her short film La Pájara Pinta premiered at the Lincoln Center Film Society LatinBeat Film Festival. Heredia’s editorial work can be seen in the HBO feature-length documentary Addiction, which received the 2007 Emmy Governors Award, and Alive Day Memories—Home from Iraq, executive produced by James Gandolfini for HBO. Her new edit, The Art of Failure: Chuck Connelly Not for Sale and Jacques D'Ambois in China, will air on HBO this summer. Other editorial credits include: Modulations Cinema for the Ear, The Vagina Monologues, Finding Christa and Free Tibet. Paula’s work and creative process is featured in the book: The Art of the Documentary by Megan Cunningham. With partner Larry Garvin, she co-founded Heredia Pictures, heads the international committee of New York Women in Film and Television and serves on the board of advisors of Tribeca All Access and Clementina, Inc.

Chi-hui Yang is a film programmer, lecturer and writer based in New York. As a guest curator, Yang has presented film and video series at film festivals and events internationally, including MoMA's Documentary Fortnight, Robert Flaherty Film Seminar (“The Age of Migration”), Seattle International Film Festival, Washington D.C. International Film Festival and Barcelona Asian Film Festival. From 2000-2010 he was the Director and Programmer of the San Francisco International Asian American Film Festival, the largest showcase of its kind in the Us. Yang is also the programmer of “Cinema Asian America,” a new On-Demand service offered by Comcast and currently a Visiting Scholar at New York University’s Asian/Pacific/American Institute.

Nominating Committee

- Isabel Arrate Fernandez, Idfa, The Netherlands

- Hugo Chaparro, film critic, Colombia

- Lucile De Calan, programmer, Biarritz Latin American Film Festival, France

- Denis de la Roca, programmer, Abu Dhabi Film Festival

- Mara Fortes, programmer, Morelia Film Festival

- Erick Gonzalez, programmer, Valdivia Film Festival, Chile

- Elías Jiménez, director, Festival Ícaro, Guatemala

- Roger Alan Koza, film critic and programmer, Filmfest Hamburg, Ficunam, Mexico

- Janneke Langelaan, Hubert Bals Fund, The Netherlands

- Diego Lerer, film critic, Argentina

- Rosa Martinez Rivero, film producer, Argentina

- Christian Sida-Valenzuela, director, Vancouver Latin American Film Festival

- Hebe Tabachnik, programmer, Los Angeles and Palm Springs Film Festivals

- Sergio Wolf, film programmer, Argentina
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

Poster and Trailer for Fashion Documentary ‘God Save My Shoes’

  • The Film Stage
Fashion documentaries offer a glimpse into a world only seen by those beautiful or glamorous enough to penetrate it. Most follow the iconic individuals who make the industry, like Isaac Mizrahi in Unzipped, Anna Wintour in September Issue, or the work on New York Times fashion photographer Bill Cunningham. Titles like Valentino: The Last Emperor and the more recent Ultrasuede: In Search of Halston tease with the promise of larger-than-life personas, putting the designers and their personalities before the clothing that made them famous.

First time filmmaker Julie Benasra takes the spotlight away from the men and women behind the labels and magazines to look at the cultural importance of shoes. According to an official press release, God Save My Shoes explores “the passionate relationship between women and their shoes, and to examine how shoes have come to occupy such a pivotal role in pop culture, sexuality and women’s lives.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Week Six At The Edit Center

On Monday we watch the famous f*ck scene from The Wire. In the past I have seen this scene used as an example of great writing, great directing and great acting. It seems to be a quintessential teaching scene. If you don’t know what I am talking about, you can see it below.

We also watch a sequence from Unzipped, the documentary that follows the fashion designer Isaac Mizrahi (1995, edited by Alan Oxman, cinematography by Ellen Kuras, who went on to shoot a long list of films including Eternal Sunshine of The Spotless mind). Its lyrical look, pacing and creative decisions about color have come to influence the look of many later documentaries. We also have a tech lecture on how to pull a video from YouTube to use in your edit, which can be helpful in any number of ways, especially in the instance of documentaries if
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Valentino – The Last Emperor, a gold mine of snappy lines

Lauren Cochrane digs out some of the best lines from fashion films

Fashion has to be one of the most TV-friendly industries. Forget the photogenic models and endless champagne-fuelled parties; the words that fashion mouths spout are pure TV gold. For proof, check out ValentinoThe Last Emperor, a look at the life of designer Valentino Garavani and his partner Giancarlo Giammetti. Filmed just before the duo left the label in 2008, the doc boasts drama, drama and more drama. There's bickering between Giammetti and Garavani over which side of the street they originally met, a baddie in the shape of business owner Matteo Marzotto and, of course, plenty of choice lines. In tribute, we present The Guide's favourite quotes from fashion TV to date. Be warned: Chanel designer Karl Lagerfeld features heavily …

"An evening dress that reveals a woman's ankles while walking is the most disgusting thing I have ever
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

RIP Eartha Kitt

RIP Eartha Kitt
A sad note on Christmas, legendary singer/actress Eartha Kitt died today @ 81 years of age. Like most people in my generation I first encountered her purrrfection as one incarnation of "Catwoman" on syndicated reruns of the campy 60s Batman series. I always meant to attend one of her cabaret shows here in NYC but never did (pricey $) but I was able to see her on Broadway once in The Wild Party where she stopped the show with the 11th hour eventual classic (just wait) "When It Ends." Though she was always more of a celebrity and TV star than a film actress, she did that too: recent credits included Holes and voicing Yzma for Disney's The Emperor's New Groove. You'll also undoubtedly remember her great purring cameo in the Isaac Mizrahi documentary Unzipped.

Here's Eartha doing her classic "Santa Baby". She was still performing in her early 80s. Here's to indisputable longevity and individuality.
See full article at FilmExperience »

Mizrahi inks with NBC syndie arm

Mizrahi inks with NBC syndie arm
NBC Enterprises has signed designer and TV show host Isaac Mizrahi to an overall development deal. Mizrahi has been hosting The Isaac Mizrahi Show on the Oxygen Network for the past three years. With Marisa Gardini and Larry Brezner, he is developing a potential series for national syndication with NBC Enterprises, NBCE president Ed Wilson said. An award-winning designer, Mizrahi rose to fame in 1995 as the subject of director Douglas Keeve's highly acclaimed documentary Unzipped, which won the Audience Award for Documentaries at the Sundance Film Festival that year. Distributed by Miramax Films, the film was screened internationally at the Cannes and Venice film festivals and opened nationally Aug. 4, 1995. In 2000, Mizrahi wrote and starred in the well-received off-Broadway show Les MIZrahi.

See also

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