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Netflix Original Movie Review: Shimmer Lake Is a Backwards Tour de Force

Netflix Original Movie Review: Shimmer Lake Is a Backwards Tour de Force
Told backwards, Shimmer Lake is the kind of crime drama that very much revels in keeping it's audience in the dark. There is no hand holding here. No re-explaining things that the audience might miss. This film, from first time director Oren Uziel, is the kind of calling card that has been used to launch careers, like that of Quentin Tarantino.

In order to describe this film, the plot must be kept deceptively simple. First of all, telling this story backwards only serves to underscore what we are seeing on screen. By dint of the fact that we want to know why a scene is starting the way that it is, and the shock we feel when it ends abruptly, is palpable throughout this entire film. Not only is this story told backwards, it is is also told over the course of a week. It follows a local sheriff trying
See full article at MovieWeb »

The Danny Boyle sci-fi short film we never got to see

Ryan Lambie Jan 31, 2017

Shot well over 18 years ago, Danny Boyle's sci-fi short film Alien Love Triangle has never been released - despite a starry cast...

In the late 90s, two very different filmmakers were still in the (relatively) early stages of their careers. Mexican director Guillermo del Toro had released his first feature, Cronos (1993) to widespread acclaim. The UK's Danny Boyle had captured the zeitgeist with his second movie, Trainspotting, and was about to embark on his next film, A Life Less Ordinary (1997).

See related A closer look at Jodorowsky's Dune The fall and rise of Alejandro Jodorowsky's Dune Looking back at David Lynch’s Blue Velvet

Had everything gone to plan, del Toro and Boyle could have wound up directing their own chapters of a three-part anthology movie - the sci-fi equivalent of, say, Amicus Productions' portmanteau horror films of the 60s and 70s, such as The House That Dripped Blood
See full article at Den of Geek »

Christopher Walken To Receive Award, The Limehouse Golem to Close Sitges 2016

Christopher Walken will receive the Grand Honourary Award at Sitges 2016 this year. A stellar career whose highlights include iconic performances in The Deer Hunter, The Dead Zone, Things to Do in Denver When You're Dead, and countless other films, will grace the festival with his presence next month to accept this great honour (and yes, I will be asking him to dance).  This great news comes on the heels of a flurry of screening announcements. Closing the festival will be Juan Carlos Medina's The Limehouse Golem, a Victorian serial killer tale starring Bill Nighy and Olivia Cooke. Other recently added titles from Europe and the Americas include Alice Lowe's fantastic Prevenge; The Untamed, a monster movie of a different colour from Mexico, and Raw,...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

'Jumanji' Remake on Target for Christmas 2016 Release

'Jumanji' Remake on Target for Christmas 2016 Release
Back in August, Sony Pictures issued release dates for a number of high-profile projects, all set to hit theaters between 2016 and 2017. One of those movies is their Jumanji remake, which has been in development for several years, with Zach Helm coming aboard to write the script back in 2012. Today, Deadline reports that the studio has hired screenwriter Scott Rosenberg (Con Air) to rewrite the script in hopes that it makes its announced holiday release next year.

The remake is said to be a high priority for the studio, described as a "re-imagination" of the original 1995 blockbuster Jumanji, which starred Robin Williams, Kirsten Dunst, Bonnie Hunt and Bebe Neuwirth. The original movie was spawned from the board game and book by writer Chris Van Allsburg (The Polar Express, Zathura). The movie earned a whopping $262.7 million worldwide at the box office, from a $65 million production budget.

Jumanji will hit theaters on Christmas
See full article at MovieWeb »

77 Reasons Christopher Lloyd Is Awesome, in Honor of His 77th Birthday

Happy 77th birthday to one of our favorite actors, Christopher Lloyd!

The actor, who's played some of filmdom's most beloved characters, including Doc Brown in "Back to the Future," Professor Plum in "Clue," and Uncle Fester in the "Addams Family" films, was born on October 22, 1938 in Stamford, Conn.

Partly because of his height, and partly because of his manic intensity and commitment to even the wildest characters, he's portrayed a series of eccentrics, from mad scientists to aliens; had an impressive, award-winning theater career; and will always be remembered as Reverend Jim on "Taxi."

In honor of his 77th birthday, we've come up with 75 reasons why he's so awesome.

1. He's played a Klingon, a cartoon, the Wizard of Oz, an angel, a leper, and a geriatric vampire.

2. He stands an impressive 6'1."

3. Because he's so tall, he had to hunch over to appear in the same frame with "Back to the Future
See full article at Moviefone »

'Kids': The Oral History of the Most Controversial Film of the Nineties

'Kids': The Oral History of the Most Controversial Film of the Nineties
It was the summer of 1995. Bill Clinton was president, Rudy Giuliani was mayor of New York, and Oj Simpson was on trial. That summer’s youth-oriented movies included Pixar's first movie Toy Story, the Disney musical Pocahontas — and Kids, in which wayward, stoned teens fuck each other senseless and head-stomp random strangers.

It might be hard to remember just how notorious Larry Clark's indie-skater odysey was. The movie grossed a modest $7 million at the box office that summer — a wild success when you account for the fact that it
See full article at Rolling Stone »

8 big movies whose scripts dramatically changed

Con Air, Last Action Hero, Brainscan and Die Hard 4.0 could all have been very different films, going by the early drafts of their scripts.

The life of a Hollywood screenwriter might sound like a glamorous one, but it's not all premieres and champagne.

As one of the smaller cogs in an often complex machine, the writer can often find his or her work changed almost beyond recognition by other hands. Such is the case with the following movies, which were all changed quite drastically in one way or another between their original draft and their final cut.

Some scripts were pressed into service as sequels. Some began in one genre and wound up in another. Rather than put together an exhaustive list, we've chosen a few examples of the script changes that intrigued or bemused us most.

Con Air

Nic Cage with lank hair and a thick southern drawl. An
See full article at Den of Geek »

Christopher Walken just wants to dance

Christopher Walken just wants to dance
"Who is the greatest villain of all time?" demands Christopher Walken, standing aboard a ship's deck on a Long Island soundstage. An obvious answer would be Walken himself. During his lengthy and mayhem-filled movie career, he has shot an unarmed Dennis Hopper in True Romance, taken out a hit on Andy Garcia in Things to Do in Denver When You're Dead, and plotted a watery death for the entire population of Silicon Valley in the Bond movie A View to a Kill. But today, something is very different about Walken. Soon after delivering that line, he begins to sing—wearing full pirate regalia,
See full article at EW.com - Inside TV »

'Pulp Fiction' spawn: The best and worst of the Tarantino clones that followed

'Pulp Fiction' spawn: The best and worst of the Tarantino clones that followed
When Pulp Fiction opened in theaters 20 years ago today, the mainstream moviegoing audience was introduced to a dynamic new Hollywood talent. Quentin Tarantino was a 31-year-old hipster whose formal film education never rose much higher than working as a clerk in a Manhattan Beach video store. A walking encyclopedia of film history who fetishized some of the more obscure genres, Tarantino had a gift for dialog and his own visual toolbox that expanded the language of cinematic storytelling. Pulp Fiction was the culmination of a two-year stretch where the director went from Nobody to Wunderkind, beginning with the Sundance premiere
See full article at EW.com - Inside Movies »

Andy Garcia and Raymond De Felitta on twisting the crime genre in 'Rob the Mob'

  • Hitfix
Andy Garcia and Raymond De Felitta on twisting the crime genre in 'Rob the Mob'
Miami - We've so often seen Andy Garcia performing in an Italian-American gangster guise – from “The Untouchables” to “Things to Do in Denver When You're Dead” to, of course, his Oscar-nominated breakout role in “The Godfather Part III” – that it's easy to forget the Havana-born actor's Cuban heritage. Or perhaps not so easy in Miami, Garcia's hometown from the age of five. Back in town for the Miami Film Festival premiere of his new film “Rob the Mob,” Garcia is greeted with a collective roar of affection by the local crowd packing out the city's spectacular Gusman Theater; earlier that day, when we meet for a chat in the Standard Hotel restaurant, he has the breezy assurance of a man who knows his way around. His old high school, he points out, is a short distance down the street, while a number of his films have played the festival
See full article at Hitfix »

Out of the Furnace: return of the gangster

After years of erudite movie mob bosses and Camus-quoting killers, Woody Harrelson has singlehandedly revived the good, old-fashioned thug

In the very first scene in the harrowing new film Out of the Furnace, Woody Harrelson swings opens the car door, tumbles out of the driver's seat and pukes his guts out. He then forces his gabby consort to swallow whole what appears to be a revolting hot dog, beats senseless a well-meaning but overmatched Sir Galahad who unwisely comes to her rescue, and spends the rest of the movie doing violent, horrible things, many of which result in other people's deaths. Not once does he say anything witty or incisive or clever, much less pithy. Not once does he say anything that could be construed as ironic. Not once does he engage his Jurassic associates in lighthearted banter. No, in Out of the Furnace, Harrelson plays a good, old-fashioned thug.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The top 25 underappreciated films of 1996

Odd List Ryan Lambie Simon Brew 31 Oct 2013 - 07:01

We train our sights on the year 1996, and the 25 underappreciated films it has to offer...

Independence Day managed to revive both the alien invasion movie and the disaster flick in 1996, and just about every other mainstream picture released that year lived in its saucer-shaped shadow.

Yet beyond the aerial battles of Independence Day, the flying cows in Twister, and the high-wire antics of Tom Cruise in Brian De Palma's Mission: Impossible, there sat an entire library of lesser-known and underappreciated movies.

As part of our attempts to highlight the unsung greats of the 90s, here's our selection of 25 such films from 1996 - the year chess champion Garry Kasparov lost to the might of the computer Deep Blue, and the year comedy star Jim Carrey starred in an unexpectedly dark tale of obsession...

25. The Cable Guy

We can't sit here and
See full article at Den of Geek »

The top 25 underappreciated films of 1995

Odd List Ryan Lambie Simon Brew 24 Oct 2013 - 06:46

Another 25 unsung greats come under the spotlight, as we provide our pick of the underappreciated films of 1995...

The year covered in this week's underrated movie rundown was significant for a number of reasons. It was the year that saw the release of Toy Story - the groundbreaking movie that would cement Pixar's reputation as an animation studio, and set the tempo for CG family movies for the next 18 years and counting. It was the year that saw James Bond (played by Pierce Brosnan for the first time) emerge for GoldenEye after a six-year break. It was also the year of Michael Mann's Heat, Dogme 95, and the moment where Terry Gilliam scored a much-deserved hit with 12 Monkeys.

As ever, we're focusing on a few of the lesser-known films from this particular year, and we've had to think carefully about what's made the cut and what hasn't.
See full article at Den of Geek »

75 Reasons Christopher Lloyd Is Awesome, in Honor of His 75th Birthday

Happy 75th birthday to one of our favorite actors, Christopher Lloyd!

The actor, who's played some of filmdom's most beloved characters, including Doc Brown in "Back to the Future," Professor Plum in "Clue," and Uncle Fester in the "Addams Family" films, was born on October 22, 1938 in Stamford, Conn.

Partly because of his height, and partly because of his manic intensity and commitment to even the wildest characters, he's portrayed a series of eccentrics, from mad scientists to aliens; had an impressive, award-winning theater career; and will always be remembered as Reverend Jim on "Taxi."

In honor of his 75th birthday, we've come up with 75 reasons why he's so awesome.

1. He's played a Klingon, a cartoon, the Wizard of Oz, an angel, a leper, and a geriatric vampire.

2. He stands an impressive 6'1."

3. Because he's so tall, he had to hunch over to appear in the same frame with "Back to the Future
See full article at Moviefone »

James Franco tangles with the wrong man in Jason Statham in new Homefront trailer

Trailer for Homefront. Written by Sylvester Stallone. It's not often you get to see such a happy James Franco as the villain, but here we go. The new trailer for Homefront is much better than I expected it to be, and the film directed by Gary Fleder, looks to deliver action, and thrills galore, mixed in with some pretty solid acting. Fleder's got quite a credit list on him, in both film and television, although mostly TV. Those include Imposter, Don't Say a Word, Kiss the Girls, the awesome Things to Do in Denver When You're Dead, The Express and very effective Runaway Jury, among others. Homefront is an action movie about a widowed ex-dea agent (Jason Statham) who retires to a small town for the sake of his 10-year-old daughter. The only problem is he picked the wrong town.
See full article at Upcoming-Movies.com »

First Photos Debut From Sylvester Stallone-Penned Action Movie 'Homefront' Starring Jason Statham And James Franco

"Homefront," a movie we had no idea even existed until literally fifteen minutes ago, sounds kind of enjoyable in a junky, nothing-else-is-playing kind of way. It stars Jason Statham, king of B-grade action movies, as a former DEA agent who returns to his home down only to get hassled by a drug kingpin named gator (James Franco, of course). And if all of that wasn't enough to get your tough guy appreciation levels up, the movie was written by none other than Sylvester Stallone, whose script is based on a novel by Chuck Hogan ("The Town"). And now the first photos from the November release have debuted courtesy of USA Today. Testosterone-y! According to the USA Today report, Winona Ryder also plays one of the "local thugs" in Franco's orbit. "Looking at it with the paradigm of the Western, (Franco) is the guy with the black hat on. Even the
See full article at The Playlist »

Director Simon West: Stolen, Con Air, Rick Astley and more

Interview Ryan Lambie 5 Aug 2013 - 06:59

With his latest film, Stolen, out now, director Simon West talks to us about Con Air, Jason Statham, Expendables 2, Rick Astley, and more...

Although it's always a pleasure to talk to a filmmaker about their work, it's not often you get half-an-hour or so to really go into a more detailed conversation about their career to date. It was a real treat, then, to be able to talk to director Simon West about such a huge range of topics, from working with Nicolas Cage and Jason Statham to his transition from working in commercials to making the 90s summer blockbuster Con Air for producer Jerry Bruckheimer.

Throughout, West was generous, funny and full of great stories, and he didn't even mind when we brought up the subject of his music video for Rick Astley's Never Gonna Give You Up - an 80s chart
See full article at Den of Geek »

5 'White Collar' Season 4 Spoilers

5 'White Collar' Season 4 Spoilers
The stunt and spectacle-heavy season three finale left White Collar fans desperate to know what would happen after Neal fled NYC, with Peter's blessing, after learning Agent Kramer planned to turn Neal into, for all intents and purposes, the F.B.I.'s bitch boy.

Photos - Matt & Willie Goof Around While Filming

To deduce that answer, and learn everything imaginable about the new season, I spent yesterday hunkered down on the White Collar soundstages as the cast was prepping to shoot the mid-season finale. And while much of what I learned is on lockdown (for now), there are five season four tidbits I simply had to share.

Photos - Matt Bomer Gets Tropical

Season Four is All About Neal's Past

When season four picks up, on the tropical island to which Neal and Mozzie have fled, TV's most dashing con-man finds himself in quite a personal crisis. "One of the interesting things that Neal discovers when he
See full article at The Insider »

John Moore Confirmed for Die Hard 5

Yippee ki-yay. For better or worse, it appears that Bruce Willis and 20th Century Fox have finally decided on a skipper for Die Hard 5. After searching high and low for the past month or so, they have ended up right back where they started: Max Payne director John Moore. Negotiations are now underway for Moore to replace Noam Murro (Smart People), who was originally attached to direct until he left the project to take on 300: Battle Of Artemisia. Other filmmakers that were recently rumoured to be under consideration include Joe Cornish (Attack the Block), Justin Lin (Fast Five), Nicolas Winding Refn (Drive), Gary Fleder (Things to Do in Denver When You're Dead), Paul McGuigan (Lucky Number Slevin) and Mikael Hafstrom (1408). Good to know that Fox decided to go with the least interesting choice of the bunch. According to Deadline, Fox had been long since sold on Moore for the project,
See full article at FilmJunk »

Gary Fleder Attached To Direct Protection

Gary Fleder, (who helmed several episodes of HBO's Tales From The Crypt ) is attached to direct the thriller Protection for 20th Century Fox. The story centers on a college professor who investigates the disappearance of his wife and daughter and who must confront authorities at the Witness Protection Program to find them. Mark Bomback has been tapped to rewrite the script, which was an original spec from Allan Loeb. John Davis is producing via his Fox-based shingle, Davis Entertainment. Fleder, (who directed Things To Do In Denver When You're Dead ) is also attached to helm the crime thriller Darkling Cove for Davis Entertainment.
See full article at shocktillyoudrop »
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