IMDb > Se7en (1995) > Reviews & Ratings - IMDb
Se7en
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Reviews & Ratings for
Se7en More at IMDbPro »

Write review
Filter: Hide Spoilers:
Page 4 of 108: [Prev][1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11] [12] [13] [14] [Next]
Index 1080 reviews in total 

4 out of 4 people found the following review useful:

Who's right and who's wrong?

10/10
Author: William Moon (moonwio) from Auburn, Alabama, U.S.
23 May 2005

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

This is an outstanding movie. Morgan Freeman and Kevin Spacey are pitch-perfect, and Brad Pitt is solid. Pitt actually had a lot to do with this movie's success outside of his acting. He forced the studio to keep the original ending, and he forced them to shell out the money to get Spacey. It is fortunate that he did, as those two elements are central to the movie's greatness. Spacey played the killer so chillingly that it makes his message seem all the more unnerving and, perhaps, correct. The uncompromising ending leaves the viewer shocked and reeling. This movie could not have worked without it. Outside of those obvious elements, another key to the film is Freeman's character. His outlook on life is and how it is affected by the murders and by his new partner is a key subplot the film. It brings more weight to the picture. Also, David Fincher's dark, dreary direction adds to the film, somewhat similar to the way Ridley Scott's dark vision adds to Blade Runner. The constant rain is a nice touch, especially when it ironically recedes after the killer shows up. I was never a Nine Inch Nails fan, but their dark brand of music fits this film well, as evidenced in the opening credits. Overall, I think this is one of the great films of all time. Watch it if you can handle grisly images and if you like unnerving endings.

Was the above review useful to you?

4 out of 4 people found the following review useful:

The Defining Thriller Of The '90's

10/10
Author: Eumenides-0 from Portugal
24 July 2004

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

WARNING: SPOILERS AHEAD

As far as the '90's are concerned, there were two good thrillers: The Silence Of The Lambs and Se7en. Kevin Andrew Walker and David Fincher appeared out of nowhere - B movie productions, actually - and took audiences by surprise with a gritty story that mixed urban loneliness, musings on contemporary life, the buddy cop genre, an unprecedented villain in cinema, a violent message against modern society, an intelligent plot with good dialogue and characterisation, and an unforgettable twist at the end that launched a thousand imitations. Indeed, the effects of the marvelous twist are still visible today, in horrible movies like Secret Window, Identity or Godsend. It's become a rule to expect for a twist in thrillers nowadays, sometimes in movies that don't even need them. The one in Se7en made all the sense and besides there was still a great story behind it with great characters, powerful feelings and high stakes. Some thrillers today, though, seem so committed with dazzling the audiences with their bad twists they forget to tell an actual story in the meantime.

On the surface, Se7en is a very simple movie: a retiring detective teams with up his substitute and for seven days they chase a serial killer whose modus operandi is killing each victim after a different deadly sin. It's almost like those slashers where the killer picks his victims one by one. Like I said, it's a simple story… but then, all the good movies usually are. What sets this villain - named only John Doe - apart from average killers is that he has the determination, patience and cunningness to elaborate a plan that has taken him over a year to finally come together: Mills and Sommerset, the detectives, are just poor fools walking into this trap. They're capable men on the whole, and they even disturb John's plans once, which, to me at least, is what sets off John's terrifying revenge at the end… he just loves having the upper hand. More remarkably, his plan does have a purpose: to sensitise society with his murders, to force everyone to look inside themselves and start thinking about what's wrong in society, through his twisted, corrupted vision, of course… basically, he wants to wake up everyone from what he thinks is a collective sleepwalking, the way people go around their business in every-day life without caring about the others around them, locked in their own tiny lives like they're not part of humanity.

There are several high points in this movie, the twist notwithstanding: any of the murder scenes is shockingly beautiful, sometimes dark and grotesque, others beautiful and full of peace; listening to Bach in this movie was a pleasant surprise, and so is the scene where it's playing, as Sommerset goes about a darkly-lit library looking for books about the seven deadly sins; John Doe walking into the precinct on his own, drenched in blood, asking to be arrested, he strikes everyone as a calm, peaceful little man, but his reputation is so famous everyone just stays clear as if he were a bomber; the conversation between Sommerset and Doe in the car as they drive to the place where Doe has two bodies buried, and they discuss the nature of John's work: is he just a sadistic bastard, or a servant of God? Or is he just a pathetic madmen craving for attention?

Se7en is an impeccable movie from the beginning to the end. I don't see any faults in the acting, directing - Fincher's sets are outstanding! - or screen writing. I loved it the first time I saw it, and it's still one of my favourite movies today. I just wish more thrillers like this were made on a regular - I don't mean hitting us with a boring twist in the last second, but with solid characters, a good story and an intelligent plot.

Was the above review useful to you?

4 out of 4 people found the following review useful:

One of the finest films ever made...

10/10
Author: hooflethroid (hooflethroid@hotmail.com) from Lincoln, England
11 January 2004

I first saw this movie when I first visited America, I knew nothing about this film (as it had just opened) so I paid my money and gave the film a chance. It simply blew me away. The ending is just unbelievable. The performances are fantastic, the direction and art design are exceptional and Kevin Spacey (my fave actor) popping up towards the end was the icing on the cake. Plus every time I watch the film now it reminds me of being in America... it's my favourite movie, for so many reasons. :)

Was the above review useful to you?

4 out of 4 people found the following review useful:

Oh, my god...

Author: tripwires from Singapore
15 November 2001

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

(This review may contain spoilers)

I'll just go right ahead and say this: Kevin Spacey is phenomenal. His portrayal of a serial killer is perhaps the best I've seen. He was only on screen towards the end of the film, but for me personally, he stole the movie. John Doe's eerily slow way of speaking (unless agitated) and his blank, vacant stare will more or less linger in the audience's minds for a while. I've not seen much of Spacey, only in this and "L.A. Confidential", which got me interested in him, but John Doe has made me a fan. He is amazing, and easily surpasses the two leads, Brad Pitt and Morgan Freeman.

"Se7en" is definitely one of the most intense, disgusting and intriguing thriller I've seen for a long time. Unlike recent thrillers ("The Bone Collector" instantly springs to mind), it features a killer whose motive murder is believable and understandable, and not completely laughable like "The Bone Collector". He's a man who appears to be as ordinary as the next person, someone whom you wouldn't look at twice on the streets, but underneath that exterior lies a dark side. The film can be looked at an exploration of the darker side of the human mind (which is also what "8MM" did, and it should only make sense, as it is written by the same person), and John Doe is the right person to pick. Throughout history we have seen people like him, the most obvious being Jack the Ripper. For those who are interested, the character of John Doe is able to shed some light on the inner workings of some serial killers and their lines of thought. As twisted and sick as it may be, at least then one'd be able to understand.

Morgan Freeman gave a good performance, but Brad Pitt annoyed me half the time. I liked him a whole lot better in "12 Monkeys" and "Interview With the Vampire". Gwyneth Paltrow...is not an actress I like. Hell, I'm being generous already calling her an actress. Since her character is crucial to the plot, I will just forget I've ever seen her in the movie.

Andrew Kevin Smith is extremely creative, pure and simple. The victims of envy and wrath was just brilliant. I admire him a lot for being able to think of that; it was totally unexpected, and when John Doe utters "become wrath", I felt this intense chill which can only be interpreted as admiration for the writer on my part. The setting, music, lighting, and basically the entire atmosphere of the film fit the tone of the movie perfectly. Some scenes in "Se7en" made me sick to my stomach (rotting and talking corpses, anyone?), but in a movie that deals with a theme like that, those scenes become necessary.

Definitely watch "Se7en", if it's only to witness Spacey's brilliant performance. An amazing thriller.

Was the above review useful to you?

5 out of 6 people found the following review useful:

With over 900 reviews, mine is hardly necessary : ) Blu-ray: Excellent A:10 V:10

6/10
Author: lathe-of-heaven from Sunny Southern California, USA
15 August 2012

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

First off, I KNOW that I'm gonna get grief and derision from most here because, I'm sorry, but I don't really think this film is the be all, end all that everyone thinks it is.

YES, it is well made, directed, and acted; and the lighting is sharp which fits the nihilistic 'Noir'ish mood. And, yes, it was indeed pretty much the first of it's kind which set a gritty, dark tone for crime films to come. Fine... I really have no specific negatives about the movie. HOWEVER... At the end of the day did I personally really find it THAT entertaining...? Not really... Yes, the unexpected ending is both shocking and dramatic, but does it honestly make sense...? ***SPOILERS Keven Spacey clearly and explicitly states the reasons why he has committed these murders: That people are doing all these very bad things everywhere all the time and people just don't care; so, he is setting 'the example' of what people should be doing to punish these 'sinners'. Okay... Now we are supposed to believe then that out of the blue he kills a COMPLETELY innocent woman (who is also pregnant) which to me the SOLE purpose is for an (admittedly extremely dramatic and shocking) plot device to set up Mills to kill him...??? Come on... I don't buy it. It is TOTALLY contrary to the very motivation of Kevin Spacey's character. But yeah, what an ending, sure... *** END SPOILERS

Anyway, the question is, what do we find truly entertaining about a film? Putting stylistic touches or technical competence aside (such as visual effects, special or moody lighting, excellent cinematography, sound design, etc.) to me it primarily is this: How engaging or absorbing is the plot or story? How does it carry us along as it develops? How involving and complex are the characters and how interesting is the interplay and relationships between them? Now, these are just basics for most films. I realize that there are special genres or styles that we enjoy individually simply because we like those types of films (1950's Sci Fi, Slasher Horror Films, Ultra-Cheeeeezy Kung Fu movies, etc.) But, with this film at the end of the day what do we have...? Sure, we have this ghoulish, creepy, dark story of a killer who is killing by way of the 7 Deadly Sins. Okay... Characters...? Well, yes, all the actors concerned do a fine job; no real complaints there. BUT...! How deep or complex are they? How fascinating are they really? How engaging and intriguing are their interactions? To me personally, I felt that both the plot and character development to be rather shallow and superficial. I mean, WHAT do we really know about them? How deeply are we drawn into their lives and relationships? I'm sorry, but to me I really don't see a whole hell of a lot going on here other than a bunch of neatly lit, dark and somewhat moody scenes with little or no real substance. And the overall 'message' we are left with? The quite trite, common, and ultimately boring 'No one cares because the evil that people do is so arbitrary and horrible, so what's the point?' Yeah, real depth there...

So, yeah, the film is well put together and there's nothing really 'BAD' about it per se; but, I do not feel myself that after all is said and done that you walk away from it with much of anything. There are darker and FAR more entertaining Horror films out there; and there are also dark, gritty, and INFINITELY more complex and engaging crime films out there. Films where afterward you actually feel like you have either been truly entertained by a story that makes you think and guess and wonder and also with characters who make you feel and care MUCH more about them because they are portrayed in a better, fuller, and more complex way.

So, do I like dark, ambiguous, moody films? YOU BET! Do I like the dark, even nihilistic overtones of period FILM NOIR? ABSOLUTELY! Do I even like films with little substance BUT have TONS of style and mood (a la David Lynch, say) YES SIREE!!! But to me, this film, although of good quality, honestly strikes me as a 'One-Note' simplistic film and I just do NOT quite buy into the ending at all; it is merely a completely nonsensical plot device to give us a slam-bang ending.

I mean, just a random example that comes to mind, I've seen Sandra Bullock's crime film 'MURDER BY NUMBERS' like 3 times and I've fully enjoyed it each time. You have a main character that is extremely complex and engaging; you have antagonists that are thoroughly riveting and with a layered relationship that is completely fascinating. And, you have a story that as it unreels truly draws you into the psyche, feelings, and motivations of the characters. And this is just an off the top, fairly above average example; nothing Earth shaking or anything, but just a simple example of what a movie is SUPPOSED to be. Entertaining...

But, I will say this though... It has to have probably THE best opening credit sequence and background song ever!!!

For this film though, I seriously doubt that I would ever really have the desire to sit down and watch it again...

*** EDIT (2015.02.14)

Heh, I'm actually thinking about giving this another chance and watching it again... :) I'm curious if my impressions will still be the same...

Was the above review useful to you?

5 out of 6 people found the following review useful:

Can't stop watching.You are already sucked into the story.

10/10
Author: stallone-9 from Bulgaria
29 February 2008

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

The greatest thriller of all time right next to Silence of the Lambs.David Fincher has outdone himself and it shows.The story is simple.Two detectives must apprehend a twisted serial killer who punishes his victims for their own sins.But what they come across will soon change them both forever!!!Expert story teller Fincher builds non stop tension which nearly explodes by the end of the movie.Morgan Freeman and Brad Pitt are at their best here.There is great chemistry between the two and Gwyneth Paltrow is terrific as Tracy.The end of the movie is one of the most shocking experiences ever on film.The first time when I saw Se7en i was shocked,horrified and just couldn't believe what just happened.THE END will shock you be sure but that is one of the reasons the movie is so good.The final lines by Somerset are moving:"Ernest Hemingway once wrote that the world is a fine place worth fighting for...I agree with the second part".

Was the above review useful to you?

5 out of 6 people found the following review useful:

Tough thriller with an incredible climax.

Author: Brad K. from Wisconsin
3 April 1999

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

Seven is a very dark and tough thriller. Most of the scenes are shot in dimly lit and wet places which add a lot to the dark mood of the film. Andrew Kevin Walker (8mm) wrote this somewhat brilliant screenplay in which Brad Pitt (12 Monkeys, Legends of the Fall) plays a young and cocky detective new at the precinct who gets help from the wise old veteran about to retire, played by Morgan Freeman (Hard Rain, The Shawshank Redemption). In their first few days together they discover a few bizzare and gory murder victims which seemed to be done in a certain and planned way. Soon Freeman is convinced that someone is using the seven deadly sins to kill people and preach a sermon. So Pitt and Freeman are off on a man-hunt trying to find this man. Gwyneth Palthrow (Shakespeare in Love, Emma) plays Pitt's wife in the film. This is a disturbing film with several graphic post-murder scenes, but still a very good film. Freeman is great as he always is. Pitt was disappointing, however, giving an average performance at best. Kevin Spacey (The Usual Suspects, L.A. Confidential) is magnificent in a small, but important role. The film leads up to an incredible climax which is the best part of the film and makes watching it all very worthwhile. Highly recommended.

Was the above review useful to you?

6 out of 8 people found the following review useful:

The Greatest Crime Thriller Ever Told....With The Greatest Villain Of All Time

10/10
Author: James Aust from United Kingdom
7 January 2008

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

This is by far the finest serial killer movie of all time. The script is beautifully paced and original with a fantastic twist at the end. The acting is superb, everyone is on the top of their game. Morgan Freeman shows his versatility and superb natural ability in the role of retiring detective Somerset, Brad Pitt gives the performance of his career as the young feisty Dectective Mills and Gwyneth Paltrow is fantastic as his highly sympathetic and caring character of his wife Tracy. But of course it is Spacey who steals the show as the compelling chilling "John Doe".

His entrancingly calm and chilling performance lifts the picture above many others of its genre and his pure evil glint is just as chilling even more so than Anthony Hopkins in "The Silence of the Lambs".

I believe that Se7en is far far superior to "The Silence of the Lambs" and others of its kind. It was one of the greatest films of the 90's (for me second only to "The Usual Suspects") and i feel is constantly underrated by many. I am glad to see it at #36 although i feel it is worthy of the top 20.

This is David Fincher's finest hour as a director with his drab rainy surroundings adding a superb drab atmosphere to a drab city. Andrew Kevin Walker's script is however will be what remembered as an incredible story, perfectly crafted and acted out beautifully by Spacey, Freeman, Pitt and co.

A MUST SEE FILM FOR EVERY FAN OF GREAT 90's MOVIES, ONE OF THE DECADES GREATEST.

Was the above review useful to you?

49 out of 94 people found the following review useful:

Se7en Problems with Se7en

1/10
Author: Bill-276 from Norwalk, CT
26 February 2011

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

I can't remember the last movie I saw that was this full of crap. How did they convince that cast this story would be anything other than the "t-shirt"/"movie of the week" Brad Pitt's character said it was going to be? The performances were fine (particularly Freeman's and Spacey's). The script, however, was a travesty.

First, the consistency of the killings is completely muddled. The first five murders were committed by Spacey's character ("John Doe"--how original) because of what he perceives to be the sins committed by those he's killed. OK so far. The 6th murder (of Paltrow's character) is also done by Doe, but not because of a sin she's committed, rather because of the sin Doe perceives HE has committed. Got that? And the 7th murder is done by Pitt's character to Doe because of the sin Mills (Pitt) carries with him (I guess?). But even if you link the "Envy" murder of Doe by Mills as one of the 7 sinners who "deserved" to be killed for their sin, why was Paltrow's character killed again? And along with that, why does Pitt's character get to live for the sin of Wrath?

Another plot point that I don't think can be overlooked... If Doe was the religious lunatic he was presented to be, the murder of Paltrow's character and her unborn child would surely have been the 6th AND 7th murders. Doe was aware she's pregnant. Of course, how do you link an unborn child with a deadly sin? I see the writer's problem. His solution was a train wreck.

I also didn't buy at all that Doe was actually envious of Pitt's character. It made for a quirky plot twist, but it seemed so inconsistent for that character. It also didn't make much sense from a plot perspective (see paragraph above).

Have I got to 7 things yet? Did I mention the silly 7 in the title? How about the constant allusions to Somerset's knife, the knife tossing, etc... which turns out to be needed most in the film to open a box?

I guess if you make the assumption that John Doe is insane, then this master plan might make sense to the audience: He's insane, his plan probably shouldn't make sense. But to think that his plan worked, succeeded, was effective or even consistent at all (as Somerset's character implies by telling Mills not to kill Doe and fulfill Doe's plan), is giving WAY to much credit to the writer, and almost no credit to the audience.

I recently saw and reviewed Michael Haneke's "Funny Games" which would fall into the same psychological/horror/thriller genre as "Se7en". And as much as I was affected by "Funny Games" and impressed by Haneke's vision and direction, I said that I couldn't responsibly recommend it. After seeing "Se7en", however, I finally found Haneke's target audience. If "Se7en" is on your recommended must-see list, then "Funny Games" is really the must-see movie for you.

Was the above review useful to you?

3 out of 3 people found the following review useful:

One of the best Serial Killer films ever made

9/10
Author: you'llneverbe from United Kingdom
25 February 2009

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

"Se7en" (1995) Dir: David Fincher

There's no cinematic theme I can think of that has run the gamut from Trash to High Art (via Blockbuster) quite like the Serial Killer movie. Throughout the history of the medium, many of these films have failed to captivate large audiences the way that "Se7en" did and continues to do, usually because they were either shamelessly exploitative or far too deliberately psychological in their approach for most viewers. It's a tough balance for a filmmaker to strike, but with "Se7en" David Fincher made it look so simple. It is one of the best Serial Killer movies ever made.

Part of the reason film-goers consider Freeman, Pitt and Spacey so highly today is because of "Se7en". All three actors excel in their roles. Freeman's Detective Somerset is a week away from retirement when he becomes involved, alongside his own replacement Detective Mills (Pitt), in what is surely the most horrific multiple murder case of his long career. Mills is determined not to shy away from his first case in town, and is shown to be more impulsive than the erudite Somerset, who immediately connects the killings to several great literary works including "The Divine Comedy" and the writings of St Thomas Aquinas. They are always lagging behind the killer, walking solemnly through endless downpours to survey the crime scene of these increasingly sick murders, barely able to grasp the calculated depravity of the man they are chasing.

There are brief meditations on human apathy by both Freeman's character and the killer himself but aside from these, "Se7en" is essentially plot- and character-driven. This works to its great advantage - too much philosophy would have affected the momentum of the film, which is expertly weighted and allowed to accumulate at the right points. Nothing is clichéd, and there are no simplistic 'red herrings' to stretch the action out. It is a thoroughly modern crime film that borrows the religious themes from Horror and parts of its aesthetic from Film Noir, successfully widening its appeal in the process.

I've learnt to slightly concede in my critical judgement over years of watching silent films, art films, propaganda films, slow-moving European epics, counterculture movies et cetera, and so part of the reason I enjoyed "Se7en" so much is that I didn't need to concede anything while watching it. Quite the opposite, I was never anything but totally gripped by it. This is the power of really decent American film-making when it successfully balances visual style, directorial control, individual performances and, above all, a great story (which I won't spoil for you any further by elaborating upon in this review!)

Was the above review useful to you?


Page 4 of 108: [Prev][1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11] [12] [13] [14] [Next]

Add another review


Related Links

Plot summary Plot synopsis Ratings
Awards External reviews Parents Guide
Official site Plot keywords Main details
Your user reviews Your vote history