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81 out of 119 people found the following review useful:

The best Hollywood has produced for a long time

9/10
Author: supah79 from Netherlands
28 July 2005

After the Alien-debacle Fincher proved all the critics wrong. This film is one of the best in a genre that hasn't been very innovative for a long time.

Everyone know's the story by now, so I won't waste time telling it. This film was trend setting with it's dark, gritty look and opening sequence. We still see it copied in movies and TV-series today. Everything is great about this film. I guess if anything, the weakest link in the film is Pitt, who is grossly overshadowed by Freeman. But let's not look for flaws when there really aren't any. The script is intelligent and uncompromising. The direction is innovative en daring. The production-design and cinematography are top-notch.

Fincher is one of the big boys in Tinseltown these days. Seven is the reason why.

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46 out of 60 people found the following review useful:

No one is without sin

9/10
Author: B N from Canada
31 January 2008

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

This is one of those dark movies, where it's constantly raining and wet and where the light always seems to be dim. Appropriately enough, this changes to bright and shimmering heat in the very end. As a kid, I hated dark movies. But perhaps it is appropriate in this case, because Seven attempts to be a statement about humanity: no one is without sin.

The seven deadly sins are gluttony, greed, sloth, pride, lust, envy, and wrath. Prime examples of people committing these are being punished one by one, brutally and efficiently, by a psychopathic killer. Detectives, and reluctant partners, William Somerset (Morgan Freeman) and David Mills (Brad Pitt) are assigned to track down the killer. Needless to say, the job gets accomplished. While some might argue it is done surprisingly, I'd argue otherwise.

For once, I wasn't impressed with Pitt's acting. I thought Freeman did a great job. As usual, the villain, John Doe played by Kevin Spacey, provides a chilling performance, even though he is not given as much center stage as, say, Anthony Hopkins was in Silence of the Lambs. In fact, the whole movie seems to hurry through without giving key characters enough time to build up their emotional worth, particularly Mills' wife Tracy (Gwyneth Paltrow).

In the end, Seven does manage to get its point across effectively. While watching the movie itself, I thought it a bit anti-climatic, but when mulling it over later, the images echo very strongly in my mind. One of the most disturbing films I've seen.

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40 out of 52 people found the following review useful:

Superbly done

10/10
Author: gardenwriter from Northeastern PA
11 November 2004

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

I love psychological thrillers and this is one of the best I've seen. Morgan Freeman was elegant and convincing as a burnt out cop who wanted to retire but found the fascination of the job tough to let go of. Brad Pitt made the transition from cocky new guy to serious cop vry convincingly. And what can I say about Kevin Spacey who is always excellent. (Except to wonder why his name doesn't appear in the opening credits - I looked three times.) And Gwyneth Paltrow as Pitt's wife was as fresh and charming as ever. I truly enjoyed the performances of all the main cast members.

The best part of this film is that even when the killer is caught the suspense isn't over. In fact - it may be just beginning.

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30 out of 34 people found the following review useful:

The best thriller ever made

10/10
Author: billreynolds from usa
7 June 2005

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

Se7en is a very complex and deep movie, while also being quite disturbing. Andrew Kevin Walker created one of the most original spec screenplays of all time, but it is the kind of story traditionally used more as a writing sample than actually made into a movie. But the creative team of director David Fincher believed in this extremely dark, uncompromising story, and made it just the way Walker wrote it.

The story revolves around two extremely well-drawn characters, David Mills (Brad Pitt) and William Somerset (Morgan Freeman). In one sense their relationship is the ultimate cliché -- the old veteran cop paired up with the brash rookie (though Mills is not actually a rookie, just new to the unnamed city where the movie takes place). But the contrast between these two characters is played out not for laughs or cheap drama but as the real working out of a moral question. Somerset, the lonely, cynical older detective, cares about people but has seen too much of the dark side of life to have much hope for society. Mills is not as intelligent as Somerset (kudos to Pitt for being willing to play a character that frequently looks foolish), and he lives by a simplistic belief in the power of law enforcement to change the world.

Throughout the movie, the two characters struggle with this conflict -- is human society basically rotten, and can one person do anything to make a difference? Somerset, an intelligent, well-read man, is smart enough to recognize the truth, however painful that is. Mills is the kind of person who has never truly questioned the simple "values" he was raised with. Somerset tries to educate him, tries to warn him, but ultimately fails.

In the end, it is only John Doe, the serial killer, who can teach Mills (and by extension the audience) the truth -- that this world is very often shockingly vicious and senselessly cruel. Doe and Somerset actually have similar views of society and the world, up to a point. But while Somerset still cares about his fellow human beings, Doe hates them, and takes out his rage in a series of gruesome murders based on the seven deadly sins.

This movie is about the investigation Mills and Somerset undertake of Doe's murders, his "sermon" to the world through serial killing. Ultimately, Mills and Somerset can only do so much to try to stop Doe; the killer always seems at least one step ahead of them, and stays that way until the very end of the movie. In a normal Hollywood film, Mills and Somerset would "win" in the end by catching Doe and setting the world right again. But Andy Walker had a quite different ending in mind, and Fincher and his team take the shocking conclusion all the way to the limit of tension and drama.

This movie, like Fincher's "Fight Club," was controversial for being violent and gruesome. Certainly there are a number of gruesome and disturbing images of murder victims' bodies, and many aspects of the story are very troubling, to say the least. But only one person is shown being killed on screen, and by far the worst of what happens in this story happens in the viewer's imagination. Unlike most films that have high levels of violence -- including, for example, Reservoir Dogs or Silence of the Lambs -- this movie genuinely attempts to grapple with the moral implications of what is being shown on screen. In direct contrast with, say Quentin Tarantino, who uses extreme violence for shock effect and to gain notoriety, Fincher actually shows less violence on screen and raises far more probing moral questions in the viewer's mind. I cannot think of any movie that contains as much genuine debate and discussion among the characters about crime and human morality as this one does -- while never becoming dull or preachy for a moment.

I cannot finish this review without a word about Mr. Fincher's extraordinary visual talents. This is a man who ranks with the top handful of directors of all time in his knowledge and grasp of film-making technique. Everything from set design to lighting, selection of film stock and processing techniques, camera movement, frame composition, and editing work together to create an entirely new level of visual brilliance. Fincher's use of technique brings to mind nothing more than the work of Steven Spielberg in the 1970s, the last time a director this extraordinary burst onto the Hollywood scene. A whole generation has passed since then, and there is a new wave of techniques and tools available to the filmmaker of the nineties. Fincher uses every one of these tools to their utmost. The technical work and supporting actors are uniformly superb. This is a movie that works on every level. Andy Walker, having written a mind-blowing screenplay, must have been stunned when he saw the finished film. This movie will rock you to the core.

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27 out of 32 people found the following review useful:

Top Serial Killer Movie

9/10
Author: mjw2305 from England
30 January 2005

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

Somerset, (Morgan Freeman) a deeply Intellectual Detective, with barely a week left until his retirement and Mills, (Brad Pitt) the new cop in town, who is a pretty weak detective, are thrown together to investigate what at first appears to be another Homicide.

After a second Victim is found, Somerset realises that this is no open and shut case, and requests that he is relieved, in light of his impending retirement. Mills gladly takes over the case and plunges himself in way over his head.

As the work of a Crimally insane genius continues, Mills grows more and more erratic, and Somerset simply has to remain, to guide his young partner through the case, which ultimately leads to one of the finest climax's in movie history.

With Wonderful Performances from both Freeman and Pitt and a really dark and morbid direction from David Fincher, the movie is crammed with suspense, intrigue and Excitement.

My Favourite scene is John Doe (Kevin Spacey) tearing into Mills in the car, driving towards the Climax, the acting is simply perfect as Pitt's character is torn apart by the genius of the Criminally insane, and Freeman interjects with insightful rationality, demonstrating his superior mind. The Scene Carries such intensity, and at the same time encapsulates the primary characters basic elements. Most actors can't achieve this level of character depth, but these are three of the finest actors of our time. 9/10

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30 out of 39 people found the following review useful:

One Of The Greatest Thrillers Of All-Time…

10/10
Author: Sergeant_Tibbs from Suffolk, England
10 March 2007

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

In 1995 David Fincher released a perfectly constructed modern masterpiece; Se7en. One of the most exhilarating experiences of all-time and a classic to come.

A cop; Detective David Mills (Brad Pitt) has just moved into the city with his wife, Tracy (Gwyneth Paltrow) in hope of finally settling down. Mills will take over the job of Detective Lt. William Somerset (Morgan Freeman) an old cop who has seven days until his retirement begins. Both are dedicated to the badge. They are put together on the case of an obesity murder, in which a man has been forced to 'eat till he bursts'. This then leads to another murder scene in which a lawyer has bled to death, although the murderer didn't actually use the knife; he made the lawyer do it. This is just the beginning of a mass murder masterpiece crafted by the insane John Doe, brilliantly played by Kevin Spacey.

Whatever you do while watching it, do not see it as hollow. Se7en is far from it. Many scenes study civilisation; present civilisation. And its evil. Our society isn't a pleasant one. The film concentrates mainly on the cops search; when it comes to the mystery part in finding the killer, we discover the policemen's differences in methods, and how the most obvious one does not actually work. Of course, its Somerset, the one with the most experience who has the best way. He tries to find out why. Why some man is killing these people using a specific punishment. While Mills tries, unsuccessfully, to find out how; by studying the crime scene for clues. He ends up bored. With the help of the library, Somerset gets closer to the murderer. It may seem as though the role of Tracey is a pointless part, but she is more important than anything. She is the one who brings the men to being more personal with each other. Notice how in the dinner scene she is the one to introduce them by name. All making the climax tense and difficult.

Mills is the kind of guy to pull his gun out before his torch. He has an arrogant sense of things though is 'by the book' and works. Somerset has never even fired his weapon. He sees the evil round him. And he wants to leave it. Though he is a cop so he has the permission to do something about it. But the problem is, he isn't doing anything about it. John Doe is. The reason why society is evil is because we are allowed to sin. There is now nothing stopping us. It has become a common factor of life. And there should be. That is why John Doe thinks his behaviour is OK. But the problem is he is being stopped instead of the crime out there. This is the harsh reality we live in.

There are seven deadly sins. Gluttony. Greed. Sloth. Pride. Lust. Envy. Wrath. And seven ways to die.

Kevin Spacey is amazing as John Doe, portraying insanity perfectly. One of the greatest supporting performances of all-time already. And he's only in it for half an hour. Brad Pitt delivers a kind of forced performance which adds to the Hollywood effect of the film though I couldn't imagine anyone else for the part. Morgan Freeman played his role with the greatest concentration. Throughout he needed a look of woe on his face. And he did just that.

The writing is extraordinary. The genius, Andrew Kevin Walker took an interesting subject and created an instant classic. But most credit has to go to Fincher. Who took aspects you wouldn't even think of looking at and filming it. Together they project a deep film on our screens that no-one should miss. In one scene near the end, he makes it so when a word is spoken we cut to a character as that gives us clues to their fate. A feast for the brain. One of the most imaginative scripts of the 90s. Fincher also knows exactly how to shoot the film. Whether it be steady-cam for the slow and easy parts or the hand-held camera for the adrenalin pumping scenes.

The cinematography is what makes this an excellent movie. Everything is dark. The world out there is rough, raw, grim and gritty. It does just that. The effect it makes is astounding and truly works. The sinister music that is added keeps the heart pounding throughout and keeps the audience uncomfortable, in a good way. As that's what the film tries to achieve. The opening credits are upon the greatest segment of film I have ever seen. The jumpiness makes you feel uneasy yet intrigued to keep watching. Every scene, due to the effort put in it, is masterful and is what makes the film a joy to watch and observe.

Se7en reveals the best glimpse we have seen of the disturbing underworld. One of my favourites and always will be.

10/10

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23 out of 26 people found the following review useful:

He's experienced about as much pain and suffering as anyone I've encountered, give or take, and he still has Hell to look forward to.

10/10
Author: Spikeopath from United Kingdom
4 March 2008

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

Seven is directed by David Fincher and written by Andrew Kevin Walker. It stars Morgan Freeman, Brad Pitt, Gwyneth Paltrow, Kevin Spacey and R. Lee Ermey. Music is scored by Howard Shore and cinematography by Darius Khondji.

An unnamed US city and two cops are on the trail of a serial killer who kills his victims according to which one of the seven deadly sins they have committed.

Having been stung by the studio interference and negative fall out regarding his directorial debut feature film, Alien 3, David Fincher waited three years before committing to a project that he had control over. The result was Seven, a dark masterpiece of unremitting creeping dread that showcased the work of a clinically excellent director. Seven is not just a movie, it's an experience, an assault on the senses, a jolt to the brain, a trawl through the dark recess of some sick city where it always rains and the darkness holds many fears. This is no boorish slasher movie, it's psychological discord 101, we only see the aftermath of crimes, the discussions of which forces us to delve deep into our own imagination to fill in the blanks, forcing us to go where we don't want to go, you sense the director is somewhere gleefully pulling our strings.

"But that's the point. We see a deadly sin on every street corner, in every home, and we tolerate it. We tolerate it because it's common, it's trivial. We tolerate it morning, noon, and night. Well, not anymore. I'm setting the example. What I've done is going to be puzzled over and studied and followed... forever"

Seven is very much an ultimate horror film, really is there anything more scary than a serial killer who is smarter than the cops chasing him? Not only that but they are, oblivious as they be, part of the master plan. This killer is not only unstoppable in perpetrating his violent crimes, he is, as Freeman's weary retirement bound Detective Somerset says, methodical and patient. It's going to end bad, the cops know it and so do we, and that's when Fincher and Walker stick their hands into our guts and pull out the last semblance of solids to deliver one of the greatest endings of modern cinema. An ending fit to grace any noir, neo-noir or smart ass psychological horror movie from across the ages. With each viewing of Seven there's the repeating wave of bleak emotions that come as the reversed end credits roll, desolation and disbelief, sadness and shock, our trip through earthly hell is over, but only in the psychical sense!

Faultless cast performances, no doubt eked out by what we now know is a task-master director, photography that brilliantly brings to "light" the melancholic sheen of a decaying society and a Howard Shore score that crawls out of the speakers and cloaks your body like some evil Incubus or Succubus. Seven, a masterpiece of unease and evil wrung out by a master director. 10/10

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26 out of 37 people found the following review useful:

Didn't live up to the hype

5/10
Author: (prvteye@yahoo.com) from Seattle, Wa
3 August 2004

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

I won't bother with spoilers, as there are plenty of them in the other comments.

When all was said and done, my wife and I looked at each other and said "This is the scariest movie ever?"

What I saw was a run-of-the-mill "insane killer gets tracked down by the older, smart cop and the younger, gung-ho cop while manipulating everybody in the process". Perhaps I've become jaded, but I found nothing here that was particularly scary or mind-bending. A clever nut-job leads the police on a mad chase, punishing people as "sinners". The only difference between this and a half-dozen other serial killer movies is the theme of the killings and the fact that the killer turns himself in 3/4's of the way into the story.

This leads to the "twist" ending that seems to remain with so many people. I didn't find the "twist" horrific, though. I simply found it jarring. It didn't fit and it didn't particularly surprise me either. Once the killer decided to let Mills live, you knew he was going to mess with him somehow. The only surprise is the degree of what he did. As far as I'm concerned, they could have dispensed with the whole "wrath" setup and ended with John Doe's words to Mills - "You're only sitting here because I ALLOWED you to live and you'll know that every time you look in the mirror."

Instead, they had to go for a "shocker" ending. This is the "twist" ending that supposedly makes the movie.

Here's the thing, though - The ending doesn't fit the killer's MO. We're given every reason to believe that John Doe is clever, capable, and highly intelligent. He's on a mission. He believes in his mission. He punishes the guilty for their sins, not the innocent. Why, then, does he pick a completely innocent stranger and use her as a vehicle to brand himself as personification of Envy? If he really was envious of Mills (a fact that is highly doubtful), he was already deserving of punishment so why kill an innocent person to make the point? How does the manipulation of Mills into becoming Wrath actually punish Mills for having committed the sin of Wrath?

None of these things make any logical sense within the framework of the story. The ending is completely out of synch with everything we've learned about the killer, including his own statements. All you can do is shrug your shoulders and say "Well, you can't expect an insane killer to be logical." and that just doesn't sit right with me. Not after the buildup we were given concerning John Doe.

I can't recommend this movie. If you want to see a taut, disturbing film in this style (sans the insane serial killer) then rent "8 Millimeter" instead.

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23 out of 34 people found the following review useful:

Modern Horror At Its Best

9/10
Author: MadReviewer from Oldwick, NJ
18 May 2001

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

`Se7en' is all about harsh style and gruesome substance – while it's probably not a film for everyone (particularly the squeamish), it is one of the most moody, memorable films made in recent years. A sense of absolute dread pervades each and every scene, either from the powerful words and deeds of the characters or from the dreary sets and atmosphere created by director David Fincher. There's a quote from the film `The Crow' that goes, `It can't rain all the time' . . . well, in the world of `Se7en', it can – and it does.

`Se7en' is the story of world-weary police detective William Somerset (Morgan Freeman), a man who's probably seen more terror and sadness in his lifetime than any man should ever be forced to see. Partnered with the young cop David Mills (Brad Pitt), Somerset is assigned to find the serial killer known only as John Doe. The horrific crimes of Doe are patterned after the Seven Deadly Sins – for Gluttony, one victim was literally forced to eat until his internal organs exploded; for another, Greed, the victim is forced to cut an actual pound of flesh away from his own body. John Doe is a highly literate, intelligent killer; but so is Somerset, and an astounding game of cat-and-mouse filled with unexpected twists ensues as the hunt for Doe gets underway.

Andrew Kevin Walker's script for `Se7en' is absolutely dazzling. It's smart and powerful, and doesn't pull any punches – the bodies, maimed and tortured, inexorably begin to pile up in graphic fashion, and Somerset and Mills aren't allowed to minimize the horrors they're forced to find. Each new corpse brings a true feeling of revulsion . . . and of dread, as the realization hits that another body will be forthcoming unless John Doe is found. The story is filled with misdirection and red herrings; just as the audience starts to think that the unfolding events of the film are starting to become predictable, the film lurches further into the unknown darkness, keeping the edge of uneasiness that pervades `Se7en' fresh . . . and constant. Kudos also to David Fincher's stylish direction – this may be Fincher's best film to date. The entire look of the film is dark and gloomy, almost a suicidal form of 1940s film noir, evoking a despairing atmosphere that never relents or shows a glimmer of optimism. Combine that with Fincher's knack for turning even the most mundane scene into a nailbiter – `Se7en' features a scene with Somerset and Mills standing together in an empty field, and yet the scene is still incredibly tense – and `Se7en' becomes an exceptionally powerful, disturbing film that's difficult to turn away from.

The cast? Also excellent. Pitt is perfect as the cocky young detective Mills, mixing together the right amount of bravado and testosterone at the start of the film, and then later tempering that swagger with cynicism – and fear – as the movie progresses forward. In a way, Mills is a surrogate for the audience; he starts out thinking that he knows exactly what's going to happen but as events slowly unfold before his horrified eyes, it starts to dawn on Mills that he is mentally unprepared he is for a maniac like John Doe. Pitt handles the decline of Mills from overconfident to completely paranoid with great skill. The killer John Doe (I won't reveal his name here; the actor's uncredited in the film, so I won't mention it either on the off chance that you haven't read it elsewhere) is simply great. He's a quiet, intense figure who is Machiavellian with his calculated words and actions. Many other actors might've just mimicked Hannibal Lecter to portray John Doe . . . but the awesome performance in `Se7en' of the uncredited actor is actually better – and more unsettling – than Lecter himself. The best performance of the film, however, may belong to Morgan Freeman as Somerset. Freeman is perhaps the only person capable to tracking down John Doe, simply because he has seen so much sadness and horror before. Nothing Doe does, no matter how vile, is able to derail the detective's efforts. As Somerset, Freeman imbues the character with a certain tired, weary attitude . . . but still lying somewhere beneath that attitude is hope, and that small glimmer of hope, along with the wisdom of experience, is what prevents `Se7en' from spiraling into complete despair. Somerset's hope, small as it is, becomes the audience's hope as well.

With the possible exception of the very end of the film – for all its daring audacity, Fincher chooses to play it a little too safe at the film's conclusion – `Se7en' proves to be an uncompromising tour de force of modern horror. If you're not easily bothered by graphic horror and gore, then go watch this film. You certainly won't be disappointed. Grade: A

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27 out of 42 people found the following review useful:

Pretentious and disturbingly overrated

Author: asdf-12
12 December 2004

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

I went through these comments because I was trying to figure out why people like this movie so much. I wondered if I had missed or misinterpreted something, but now it just looks like these viewers are way too impressed by a few sophomoric "themes" and a bunch of cutesy "twists."

Direction/atmosphere: the atmosphere is the movie's greatest strength. It's certainly vivid, though it's so relentless and there is so little variety in the movie's mood that it becomes a drag. Anyway, stuff like rain and good lighting are nothing without a good script, so moving on . . .

Characters: come on, classic Hollywood "mismatched buddies" movie, only without the slapstick. The young, overeager cop and the "jaded" cop who slowly learns how to deal with him. Give me a break. There's nothing here that I haven't seen in 500 other cop movies. They just stuck this million-year-old and million-times-used Hollywood trope in the middle of a serial killer movie. Bravo. As for whether John Doe is a "great villain" (I can't believe people would compare him to Keyser Soze or Hannibal Lecter), more on that in the "themes."

Plot/twists: What exactly do people think is "clever" about haivng each murder correspond to one of the 7 deadly sins? The cleverest one is the first one--the killer makes the guy "glutton himself to death" by eating until his stomach bursts--and that isn't exactly mind-blowing, but once it's out of the way and you get the basic idea, all the others are 5x less elegant. It would be cooler if the killer had actually found a way to *truly* turn people's own faults against them--i.e., trapping the "Greed" guy by making him put himself in harm's way when tempted by the promise of money, or killing the "Lust" victim just by tempting them with an attractive but diseased person. Instead, all of these murders come down to the murderer holding a gun to the person and ordering them to act something out that in some (often convoluted) way has something to do with the sin. For lust, he kills a woman while she's having sex. This is supposed to be clever/creative?

And it gets weaker, not stronger, at the end. **Spoilers alert, I guess.** The "envy" victim doesn't die of envy--instead, he kills her and explains to the cop that he's guilty of envy. How elegant. The final twist--making the guy kill him out of wrath--is the cleverest, and is cute, but that's about all I can say about it. It certainly doesn't live up to the ridiculous buildup they give it during that car ride when they say this will be a "masterpiece" and "remembered by everyone." A killer killed 6 people in contrived ways that somehow had something to do with the 6 sins, and then for the 7th he got someone to kill him out of wrath. I mean . . . not bad, but certainly not great. Plus, that last scene doesn't even make sense. If I were Morgan Freeman, I would say "Hey, put the gun down and just beat the guy up." That would be infinitely more satisfying anyway, and it would be pretty freaking easy to claim it was in self-defense afterward . . . good thing for John Doe's little scheme that they didn't think of it. Anyway, the ending is cute, but not the kind of "mind-blowing ending" that would make up for an otherwise ho-hum movie.

Themes: OK, I have a major beef with anyone who calls this movie "profound" or the killer's philosophical view "interesting." We all know there are lots of people doing bad things in the world, but: (a) it seems to me that the "seven deadly sins" are entirely the wrong place to focus, as evidenced by John Doe's unconvincing "You mean a guy didn't deserve to die for being so fat it was gross?" Come on--things like gluttony and sloth are things that you should stay away from for your own sake, but in the scheme of things that people should be killed for, they should be all the way at the bottom. You're telling me that sloth is worse than deceptiveness? Or, say, racism? I don't even think there's anything wrong with lust. And wrath can be justified. (b) Granted that we know lots of people do bad things, what exactly does it accomplish OR illustrate OR express to pick out 7 people (one of whom wasn't even guilty of any of the 7 sins) and kill them in ways that graphically illustrate the 7 sins? Is this supposed to show how sinning will kill you? (Only if there's a serial killer holding a gun to your mouth making you act it out . . .) Or just reinforce the message "Hey, sinning is bad?"

They try to present John Doe as this mysterious, rational, calculating, intriguing man completing a masterpiece, but I end up seeing him as a nutcase whose "project" makes no sense and doesn't express anything meaningful. A truly chilling character is one who scares me not just by being violent, but through the idea that he has some sort of special wisdom or intelligence that threatens my view of myself as "normal" and "right." Keyser Soze (a true mastermind) has this. Hannibal Lecter does as well. Some idiot who kills 7 random people because he's off on a Bible-beating rant that's barely coherent? Later guys, I'm gonna go watch The Usual Suspects.

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