Poland under Stalinist rule, 1953. A young nun Anna is brought to a prison where an influential priest is kept in. She discovers the priest is the man she loved a few years before. Communist authorities try to make her spy on him now.

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4 wins & 1 nomination. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Anna
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Priest
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Security Officer
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Housewife
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Abbess
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Parson
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Warden
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Warden
Dorota Maciejewska
Agnieszka Kotlarska
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Storyline

Poland under Stalinist rule, 1953. A young nun Anna is brought to a prison where an influential priest is kept in. She discovers the priest is the man she loved a few years before. Communist authorities try to make her spy on him now.

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Plot Keywords:

priest | communist | prison | nun | f rated | See All (22) »

Genres:

Drama | History | Romance

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Release Date:

15 March 1996 (Poland)  »

Also Known As:

Temptation  »

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(Eastmancolor)|
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User Reviews

 
A thought-provoking psychological drama full of moral/political/religious/sexual tension.
25 November 1998 | by (Australia) – See all my reviews

"The Temptation", as the film is known in English, is a marvelous Polish film that presents eternal psychological themes. Set in a political prison in post-war Poland, the story revolves around the sexual and spiritual tensions created when the security service coerces a beautiful young nun into close proximity to an imprisoned Polish bishop. This black and white film perfectly echoes the starkly contrasting demands in human nature: natural desire and spiritual will; fear and faith; love and rejection, subjugation and freedom. The sexual tension and human longing are palpable, and the security service's understanding of these human forces is extraordinarily well depicted, especially their ability to induce spiritual pain and doubt in order to achieve their political ends. Watching the film, the viewer is not only caught up in guessing at the actions of the protagonists, but has his own ideas and emotions constantly challenged. In this black and white film, nothing is black and white. This film by director Barbara Sass deserves wider recognition than it will undoubtedly get, and the SBS television network in Australia deserves praise for presenting the film to a wider audience.


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