5.8/10
86,145
292 user 73 critic

Mortal Kombat (1995)

Three unknowing martial artists are summoned to a mysterious island to compete in a tournament whose outcome will decide the fate of the world.

Director:

(as Paul Anderson)

Writers:

(video games), (video games) | 1 more credit »
Reviews
Popularity
1,393 ( 167)

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From $2.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

ON DISC
1 win & 3 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Sonya Blade (as Bridgette Wilson)
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Reptile (as Keith H. Cooke)
Hakim Alston ...
Kenneth Edwards ...
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Daniel Haggard ...
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Storyline

Based on the popular video game of the same name "Mortal Kombat" tells the story of an ancient tournament where the best of the best of different Realms fight each other. The goal - ten wins to be able to legally invade the losing Realm. Outworld has so far collected nine wins against Earthrealm, so it's up to Lord Rayden and his fighters to stop Outworld from reaching the final victory... Written by CyberRax

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

FIGHT! See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for non-stop martial arts action and some violence | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Official Sites:

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

18 August 1995 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Combate Mortal  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

$18,000,000 (estimated)

Gross:

$70,360,285 (USA)
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Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

| | (8 channels)

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Christopher Lambert also voiced Raiden in the French dubbed version of the film. See more »

Goofs

When Kano is eating chicken on a drumstick, the amount of chicken on the drumstick varies inconsistently between shots. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Chan: No! Please!
See more »

Crazy Credits

There are small circles containing symbols shown throughout the credits. These are intended to be used in this order (as a so-called "Kombat Kode") to obtain some special effect in the video game Mortal Kombat 3 (1995). See more »

Connections

Featured in Phelous & the Movies: Top 10 Phelous Moments 2012 (2013) See more »

Soundtracks

Utah Saints Take On The Theme From Mortal Kombat
Written by the Utah Saints and Oliver Adams
Performed by Utah Saints
Courtesy of London Records
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more (Spoiler Alert!) »

User Reviews

 
Though showing its age, "Kombat" is still as entertaining as it was in its heyday
7 March 2002 | by (San Francisco) – See all my reviews

I was living in San Diego (particularly in the suburban armpit of Del Mar) in 1995, and I remember waiting eagerly well over a year for MK's release. And it was definitely worth the wait; I saw it a total of 13 times, which stood as my all-time record for nearly four and a half years. When all was said and done, it had grossed a strong $70 million domestically, plus $100 million worldwide.

I'm not a Mortal Kombat fanatic anymore, but in retrospect MK was one of the most entertaining movies of the 1990s. It was easily the first video game-turned-movie to contain a halfway decent plot, exciting special effects, good acting and spectacular martial arts action, the latter which was before all the present-day "Crouching Tiger" wire-work nonsense. The actors underwent a three-month crash course in martial arts training, and their hard work paid off beautifully. On screen, they looked like they were really performing those moves instead of just imitating them. Unlike previous video game movie washouts like "Double Dragon" and "Street Fighter," MK also had a comprehensible plot that remained faithful to the games, and in the end won a space in gamers' hearts.

Along with the supporting cast of well-renowned martial artists, MK featured a nice cache of actors: Linden Ashby – whose screen personalities have all had a bit of a humorous smartass element to them – was perfect as Johnny Cage, likewise then-rising star Bridgette Wilson as Sonya Blade and Robin Shou as the film's centerpiece, Liu Kang. Christopher Lambert gave a witty performance as thunder god Raiden (constantly misspelled as "Rayden," much to the aggravation of many MK fans like myself), and nobody cared that he was a French actor playing a Japanese character. Cary-Hiroyuki Tagawa, who recently starred in Tim Burton's version of "Planet of the Apes," clearly had a ball playing the evil Shang Tsung, and it showed. (Heck, how many evil sorcerers get to wear cool black leather jackets?)

Unfortunately, save for Tagawa and Wilson, MK unfortunately did not spell the worldwide exposure that many had predicted would come to the stars following the film's success, and the art of animatronics, used here to bring the four-armed Goro to life, is all but extinct in this day and age, but there was no denying that back in the day, the cast and filmmakers knew they had made an entertaining movie. While I hardly watch MK anymore, the bottom line is that it was undeniably a kick in the pants during its time, and for that reason alone it continues to maintain my highest vote to this day. 10/10


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