6.6/10
9,932
78 user 50 critic

Home for the Holidays (1995)

PG-13 | | Comedy, Drama, Romance | 3 November 1995 (USA)
After losing her job, making out with her soon-to-be former boss and finding out that her daughter plans to spend Thanksgiving with her boyfriend, Claudia Larson faces spending the holiday with her family.

Director:

Writers:

(short story), (screenplay)
Reviews
Popularity
1,068 ( 395)

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2 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Walter Wedman
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Kitt
Emily Ann Lloyd ...
Brittany Lace
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Peter Arnold
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Ginny Johnson Drewer
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Ron Drewer
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Storyline

After losing her job, making out with her soon to be ex-boss, and finding out that her daughter plans to spend Thanksgiving with her boyfriend, Claudia Larson has to face spending the holiday with her family. She wonders if she can survive their crazy antics. Written by Cyndi Kessler <ckessler@ix.netcom.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

On the fourth Thursday in November, 84 million American families will gather together... And wonder why. See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Romance

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for thematic material, language and brief drug use | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

3 November 1995 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Feriados en familia  »

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Box Office

Budget:

$20,000,000 (estimated)

Gross USA:

$17,518,220
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Robert Downey, Jr., who played Charlie Chaplin, plays along side the daughter of Charlie Chaplin, Geraldine Chaplin, just as he did in Chaplin (1992). See more »

Goofs

When Tommy Larsen is on Leo Fish's shoulders changing the light bulb on the porch at Aunt Gladys's house, they fall over and the blue mat they land on pops up and remains visible. See more »

Quotes

Henry Larson: [answering phone] Herro, Rarson Lesidence.
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Connections

Referenced in Hope & Faith: Phone Home for the Holidays (2003) See more »

Soundtracks

Halls of Montezuma
Traditional
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Growing up is a process, not a destination. Enjoy the ride!
4 February 1999 | by See all my reviews

You grow older. But so does everyone else in your family. The small people who were your little brother and sister, the big people who were Mom and Dad - they all grow up and have their own lives, their own families. The world sees you as an adult with children of your own, problems that are real, concerns that completely outside and removed from this group you have known since infancy. Your family sees you as the kid who fought with your sister, and dated the class loser. And when you congregate, you realize that while your baby shoes don't fit you anymore, you're not sure what does. Neither does anyone else.

Ann Bancroft as the penultimate Mom is a jewel, pulled between her love of her family, her need to support them, her incomprehension of who they have become, and her own strong will. Robert Downey is fabulous as the manic family clown, not knowing when to stop, not knowing how to protect his closely held secret. Geraldine Chaplin steals your breath (Literally!) as the dotty maiden aunt who uses her eccentricities as a shield against the disappointments of her life. Her soliloquy is perfect. Holly Hunter is wonderful as the eldest daughter, her world in tatters around her feet, looking for and not finding comfort within the confines of her family. Cynthia Stevenson is perfect as the angry middle child, left out and feeling betrayed by her oh so much more exciting siblings. Charles Durning is the father at peace with the world and himself, wondering what all the fuss is about. And Dylan McDermott is the supreme observer, wanting to be part of their lives, looking for a way in to the circle, allowing everyone their dignity, giving them permission to laugh at their absurdities.

In spite of all this, or maybe because if it, this film is funny. It could be your own sister, your own mother. There is a wondrous joy here, a happiness that family, at least, is predictable.

Jodie Foster did an incredible job of showing the humor, drama, poignancy, frustration, love, loathing, fear, and comfort found in families. As exhausting as these two days were for this family, you know they'll be back next year. Or, as Charles Durning's character says, "There's always Christmas".


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