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9 items from 2016


Warner Bros, and its disastrous movie summer of 1997

13 June 2016 2:21 PM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

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Warner Bros has struggled with its blockbusters of late. But back in summer 1997 - Batman & Robin's year - it faced not dissimilar problems.

Earlier this year it was revealed that Warner Bros, following a string of costly movies that hadn’t hit box office gold (Pan, Jupiter Ascending, The Man From U.N.C.L.E., In The Heart Of The Sea), was restructuring its blockbuster movie business. Fewer films, fewer risks, more franchises, and more centering around movie universes seems to be the new approach, and the appointment of a new corporate team to oversee the Harry Potter franchise last week was one part of that.

In some ways, it marks the end of an era. Whilst it retains its relationships with key directing talent (Ben Affleck, Clint Eastwood, Christopher Nolan for instance), Warner Bros was, for the bulk of the 1990s in particular, the studio that the others were trying to mimic. It worked with the same stars and filmmakers time and time again, and under then-chiefs Terry Semel and Robert Daly, relationships with key talent were paramount.

Furthermore, the studio knew to leave that talent to do its job, and was also ahead of the pack in developing franchises that it could rely on to give it a string of hits.

However, whilst Warner Bros is having troubles now, its way of doing business was first seriously challenged by the failure of its slate in the summer of 1997. Once again, it seemed to have a line up to cherish, that others were envious of. But as film by film failed to click, every facet of Warner Bros’ blockbuster strategy suddenly came under scrutiny, and would ultimately fairly dramatically change. Just two summers later, the studio released The Matrix, and blockbuster cinema changed again.

But come the start of summer 1997? These are the movies that Warner Bros had lined up, and this is what happened…

February - National Lampoon’s Vegas Vacation

Things actually had got off to a decent enough start for the studio earlier in the year, so it's worth kicking off there. It brought Chevy Chase and Beverly D’Angelo back together, for the fourth National Lampoon movie, and the first since 1989’s National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation. Interestingly, it dropped the National Lampoon moniker in the Us, and instead released the eventual movie as Vegas Vacation. It was a belated sequel, back when belated sequels weren’t that big a thing.

The film was quickly pulled apart by reviewers, but it still just about clawed a profit. The production budget of $25m was eclipsed by the Us gross of $36m, and the movie would do comfortable business on video/DVD. Not a massive hit, then, but hardly a project that had a sense of foreboding about it.

Yet the problems were not far away.

May – Father's Day

Warner Bros had a mix of movies released in the Us in March and April 1997, including modest Wesley Snipes-headlined thriller Murder At 1600, and family flick Shiloh. But it launched its summer season with Father’s Day, an expensive packaged comedy from director Ivan Reitman, starring Robin Williams and Billy Crystal. It had hit written all over it.

Father’s Day was one of the movies packaged by the CAA agency, and its then-head, Mike Ovitz (listed regularly by Premiere magazine in the 1990s as one of the most powerful men in Hollywood, if not the most powerful man). That he brought together the stars, the director and the project, gave a studio a price tag, and the studio duly paid it. Given Warner Bros’ devotion to star talent (Mel Gibson, then one of the biggest movie stars in the world, and a major Warner Bros talent, was persuaded to film a cameo), it was a natural home for the film. It quickly did the deal. few questions asked.

That package, and CAA’s fees for putting it together, brought the budget for a fairly straightforward comedy to a then-staggering $85m. The problem, though, was that the film simply wasn’t very good. It’s one of those projects that looks great on paper, less great when exposed on a great big screen. Warner Bros has snapped it up, without - it seems - even properly reading the script. 

Premiere magazine quoted a Warner Bros insider back in November 1997 as saying “when [CAA] calls and says ‘we have a package, Father’s Day, with Williams and Crystal and Reitman, we say ‘great’”, adding “we don’t scrutinise the production. When we saw the movie, it took the wind out of us. We kept reshooting and enhancing, but you can’t fix something that’s bad”.

And it was bad.

The movie would prove to be the first big misfire of the summer, grossing just $35m in the Us, and not adding a fat lot more elsewhere in the world. Warner Bros’ first film of the summer was a certified flop. More would soon follow.

May - Addicted To Love

A more modestly priced project was Addicted To Love, a romantic comedy starring Meg Ryan and Matthew Broderick. Just over a year later, Warner Bros would hit big when Meg Ryan reunited with Tom Hanks for Nora Ephron’s You’ve Got Mail. But here? The film was a modest success, at best.

Directed by Griffin Dunne (making his directorial debut), and put together in partnership with Miramax, Addicted To Love was based around the Robert Palmer song of the same name. But whilst it was sold as a romcom, the muddled final cut was actually a fair bit darker. There was an underlying nastiness to some moments in the film, and when the final box office was tallied, it came in lower than the usual returns for pictures from Ryan or Broderick. Counter-programming it against the release of The Lost World: Jurassic Park didn’t massively help in this instance either, especially as the Jurassic Park sequel would smash opening weekend records.

Addicted To Love ended up with $34.6m at the Us box office. It would eke out a small profit.

June - Batman & Robin

And this is when the alarm bells started to ring very, very loudly. Summer 1997 was supposed to be about a trio of sure-fire hit sequels: Batman 4, Jurassic Park 2 and Speed 2. Only one of those would ultimately bring home the box office bacon, the others being destroyed by critics, and ultimately leaving far more empty seats than anticipated in multiplexes.

Batman & Robin, it’s easy to forget, came off the back of 1995’s Joel Schumacher-steered Batman reboot, Batman Forever that year's biggest movie). It had one of the fastest-growing stars in the world in the Batsuit (George Clooney), and the McDonald’s deals were signed even before the script was typed up. You don’t need us to tell you that you could tell, something of a theme already in Warner Bros' summer of '97.

That said, Batman & Robin still gave Warner Bros a big opening, but in the infancy of the internet as we know it, poisonous word of mouth was already beginning to spread. The film’s negative cost Warner Bros up to $140m, before marketing and distribution costs, and it opened in the Us to a hardly-sniffy $42m of business (although that was down from previous Batman movies).

But that word of mouth still accelerated its departure from cinemas. It was then very rare for a film to make over 40% of its Us gross in its first weekend. But that’s just what Batman & Robin did, taking $107.3m in America, part of a worldwide total of $238.2m. This was the worst return for a Batman movie to date, and Warner Bros had to swiftly put the brakes on plans to get Batman Triumphant moving.

It would be eight years until Batman returned to the big screen, in Christopher Nolan’s Batman Begins. Warner Bros would undergo big changes in the intervening period.

As for the immediate aftermath of Batman & Robin? Warner Bros co-chief Robert Daly would note at the end of '97 that “we’d have been better off with more action in the picture. The movie had to service too many characters”, adding that “the next Batman we do, in three years – and we have a deal with George Clooney to do it – will have one villain”.

Fortunately, Warner Bros’ one solid hit of the summer was just around the corner…

July - Contact

And breathe out.

Warner Bros bet heavily again on expensive talent here, with Robert Zemeckis bringing his adaptation of Carl Sagan’s Contact to the studio for his first film post-Forrest Gump. Warner Bros duly footed the $90m bill (back when that was still seen as a lot of money for a movie), a good chunk of which went to Jodie Foster. It invested heavily in special effects, and gave Zemeckis licence to make the film that he wanted.

The studio was rewarded with the most intelligent and arguably the best blockbuster of the summer. I’ve looked back at Contact in a lot more detail here, and it remains a fascinating film that’s stood the test of time (and arguably influenced Christopher Nolan’s more recent Interstellar).

Reviews were strong, it looked terrific, and the initial box office was good.

But then the problem hit. For whilst Contact was a solid hit for Warner Bros, it wasn’t a massively profitable one. Had Father’s Day and Batman & Robin shouldered the box office load there were supposed to, it perhaps wouldn’t have been a problem. But when they failed to take off, the pressure shifted to Contact.

The movie would gross $100.9m in the Us, and add another $70m overseas (this being an era were international box office rarely had the importance it has today). But once Warner Bros had paid its bills, there wasn’t a fat lot over for itself. Fortunately, the film still sells on disc and on-demand. Yet it wasn’t to be the massive hit the studio needed back in 1997.

July - One Eight Seven

From director Kevin Reynolds, the man who helmed Robin Hood: Prince Of Thieves and Waterworld, came modestly-priced drama 187, starring Samuel L Jackson (in a strong performance). Warner Bros wouldn’t have had massive box office expectations for the film (although it can't have been unaware that the inspirational teacher sub-genre was always worth a few quid), and it shared production duties on the $20m movie with Mel Gibson’s Icon Productions. But still, it would have had its eye on a modest success. What it got in return was red ink.

The film’s not a bad one, and certainly worth seeking out. But poor reviews gave the film an uphill struggle from the off – smaller productions arriving mid-summer really needed critics on their side, as they arguably still do – and it opened to just $2.2m of business (the less edgy, Michelle Pfeiffer-headlined school drama Dangerous Minds had been a surprise hit not two years before).

By the time its run was done, 187 hadn’t even come close to covering its production costs, with just under $6m banked.

Warner Bros’ summer slate was running out of films. But at least it had one of its most reliable movie stars around the corner…

August - Conspiracy Theory

What could go wrong? Mel Gibson and Julia Roberts were two of the biggest movie stars in the world in 1997, at a time when movie stars still equated to box office gold. Director Richard Donner, one of Warner Bros’ favourite directors, had delivered the Lethal Weapons, Maverick, Superman, The Goonies and more for the studio. Put them altogether, with Patrick Stewart (coming to wider public consciousness at the time off the back of his Star Trek: The Next Generation work) as a villain, and it should have been a big hit.

Conspiracy Theory proved to be one of the more ambitious summer blockbusters of the era. It lacks a good first act, which would be really useful in actually setting up more of what’s going on. But Gibson played an edgy cab driver who believes in deep government conspiracies, and finds himself getting closer to the truth than those around him sometimes give him credit for.

Warner Bros was probably expecting another Lethal Weapon with the reunion of Gibson (who had to be persuaded to take Conspiracy Theory on) and Donner (it’s pretty much what it got with the hugely enjoyable Maverick a few years’ earlier), but instead it got a darker drama, with an uneasy central character that didn’t exactly play to the summer box office crowd.

The bigger problem, though, was that the film never quite worked as well as you might hope. Yet star power did have advantages. While no juggernaut, the film did decent business, grossing $137m worldwide off the back of an $80m budget ($40m of which was spent on the salaries for the talent before a single roll of film was loaded into a camera). That said, in the Us it knocked a genuine smash hit, Air Force One, off the top spot. Mind you in hindsight, that was probably the film that the studio wished it had made (the cockpit set of Warner Bros' own Executive Decision was repurposed for Air Force One, fact fans).

Still: Warner Bros did get Lethal Weapon 4 off Gibson and Donner a year later…

August - Free Willy 3: The Rescue

Yeah.

Warner Bros opened its third Free Willy film on the same day as Conspiracy Theory (can you imagine a studio opening two big films on the same day now), but it was clear that this was a franchise long past its best days (and its best days hardly bring back the fondest of memories).

Still, Free Willy movies were relatively modest in cost to put together, and Warner Bros presumably felt this was a simple cashpoint project. But in a year when lots of family movies did less business than expected (Disney’s Hercules, Fox’s Home Alone 3, Disney’s Mr Magoo), Free Willy 3 barely troubled the box office. It took in just over $3m in total, and Willy would not be seen on the inside of a cinema again.

August - Steel

Not much was expected from Steel, a superhero movie headlined by Shaquille O’Neal. Which was fortunate, because not much was had.

It had a mid-August release date in the Us, at a point when a mid-August release date was more of a dumping ground than anything else. And even though the budget was set at a relatively low $16m, the film – and it’s an overused time – pretty much bombed. It took $1.7m at the Us box office, and given that its appeal hinged on a major American sports star whose fame hardly transcended the globe, its international takings did not save it (it went straight to video in many territories).

It was a miserable end to what, for warner bros, had been a thoroughly miserable summer.

So what did hit big in summer 1997?

Summer 1997 was infamous for big films failing to take off in the way that had been expected – Hercules, Speed 2, and the aforementioned Warner Bros movies – but there were several bright spots. The big winner would be Barry Sonnenfeld’s light and sprightly sci-fi comedy Men In Black, starring Will Smith and Tommy Lee Jones. Star power too helped score big hits for Harrison Ford (Air Force One), Julia Roberts (My Best Friend’s Wedding) and John Travolta (Face/Off).

This was also the summer that Nicolas Cage cemented his action movie credentials with Face/Off and Con Air. Crucially, though, the star movies that hit were the ones that veered on the side of 'good'. For the first of many years, the internet was blamed for this.

Oh, and later in the year, incidentally, Titanic would redefine just what constituted a box office hit...

What came next for Warner Bros?

In the rest of 1997, Warner Bros had a mix of projects that again enjoyed mixed fortunes. The standout was Curtis Hanson’s stunning adaptation of L.A. Confidential, that also proved to be a surprise box office success. The Devil’s Advocate didn’t do too badly either.

However, two of the studio’s key filmmakers failed to really deliver come the end of 1997. Clint Eastwood’s Midnight In The Garden Of Good And Evil failed to ignite (although many felt he was always on a hiding to nothing in trying to adapt that for the screen), and Kevin Costner’s The Postman would prove arguably the most expensive box office disappointment of the year. No wonder the studio rushed Lethal Weapon 4 into production for summer 1998. Oh, and it had The Avengers underway too (not that one), that would prove to be a 1998 disappointment.

The studio would eventually take action. The Daly-Semel management team, that had reigned for 15 years, would break up at the end of 1999, as its traditional way of doing business became less successful. The pair had already future projects that were director driven to an extent (Eyes Wide Shut), and it would still invest in movies with stars (Wild Wild West). But the immediate plan of action following the disappointment of summer 1997 – to get Batman 5 and Superman Lives made – would falter. It wouldn’t be until 1999’s The Matrix (a film that Daly and Semel struggled to get) and – crucially – 2001’s Harry Potter And The Philosopher’s Stone that the studio would really get its swagger back...

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Movies Feature Simon Brew Warner Bros 16 Jun 2016 - 05:19 Conspiracy Theory Father's Day Addicted To Love Contact National Lampoon’s Vegas Vacation One Eight Seven Steel Batman & Robin Free Willy 3: The Rescue »

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Poster Series Pays Tribute to Unmade Films From Stanley Kubrick, David Lynch, Alfred Hitchcock & More

6 June 2016 10:46 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

The sheer amount of movies in development that never saw the light of day is widely documented, but it’s rare we get a peek at what their marketing campaign might have looked at. We’ve previously highlighted the many projects that Stanley Kubrick left behind and today we have a poster series that imagines what a few of the one-sheets might have looked like, along with unmade films from Orson Welles, Alfred Hitchcock, David Lynch, and more.

Created by Fernando Reza of the Fro Design Company for his ongoing series “Ones That Got Away,” one can see some beautiful art for Kubrick’s WWII drama Aryan Papers and Napoleon (which is now resurfacing thanks to Cary Fukunaga), Lynch’s would-be Eraserhead follow-up Ronnie Rocket, Hitchcock’s serial killer story Kaleidoscope, and most recently, Guillermo del Toro‘s canned H. P. Lovecraft adaptation At the Mountains of Madness.

Also featuring Salvador Dali and Orson Welles, »

- Leonard Pearce

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82 Commandments for Successful Living, Courtesy of Alejandro Jodorowsky

23 May 2016 1:46 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Whatever you think of Alejandro Jodorowsky‘s artistic expressions, his bounty of good advice is something to be grateful for — even if the man is really just a messenger. Although one could easily get the impression that what follows is a guide to good living formulated by Jodorowsky himself, this is, in fact, a recollection of principles propagated by spiritual instructor George Ivanovich Gurdjieff, itself recalled by his daughter, Reyna d’Assia, from whom the director learned some things after a sexual encounter. Inspiration can come from many places.

And again: good advice is something to be grateful for. Collected from his book The Spiritual Journey of Alejandro Jodorowsky by Dangerous Minds, this collection contains 82 bite-sized bits to chew on, and none, as far as I can tell, should be considered absurd. Some are obvious (“Do not complain”), some tricky (“Do not become attached to anything that can destroy you »

- Nick Newman

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Match the Mustang to the movie – quiz

10 May 2016 5:11 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

As Oscar-nominated coming-of-age drama Mustang hits cinemas, can you identify which car is from which movie?

I Am Legend

You, Me and Dupree

Mr and Mrs Smith

The House Bunny

Footloose

Cannonball Run II

Starman

Supergirl

Thunderball

Diamonds Are Forever

You Only Live Twice

Goldfinger

Death Race 2000

Nighthawks

Tango & Cash

Lock Up

Mission: Impossible III

War of the Worlds

Knight and Day

Minority Report

Death Becomes Her

Twins

Pretty Woman

Big Business

Menace II Society

Dangerous Minds

Candyman

The Pelican Brief

Scream

Varsity Blues

10 Things I Hate About You

The Faculty

Fast & Furious

Fast & Furious 5

Fast & Furious 6

Fast & Furious 7

Misery

Nobody's Fool

Grumpy Old Men

Cliffhanger

0 and above.

You're out of gas

1 and above.

You're out of gas

2 and above.

You're out of gas

3 and above.

You're out of gas

4 and above.

Backseat driver

5 and above.

Backseat driver

6 and above.

Backseat driver

7 and above.

Speed freak

8 and above. »

- Benjamin Lee

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Jay Z Is Bugs Bunny and Other Essential Information About Space Jam's Soundtrack

2 May 2016 1:40 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

The much-discussed Space Jam 2 now has a director (Justin Lin) to go along with its star (LeBron James), and fans of the original (well, me, anyway) have just one question: How will the sequel's soundtrack ever live up to the original? You know, the Space Jam soundtrack. The one that gave the world "I Believe I Can Fly" and eventually went platinum six times over? That soundtrack. Released on Nov. 12, 1996, below please find a celebration of the singular piece of art that is the Space Jam soundtrack. "Fly Like an Eagle" In 1996, Seal had just won three Grammys for "Kiss From a Rose, »

- Alex Heigl, @alex_heigl

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Watch: David Cronenberg's 16mm 1966 Short Film Debut 'Transfer'

22 March 2016 2:25 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Everyone’s gotta start somewhere. You don’t make your first masterpiece overnight, and before he made the likes of “Scanners,” “Videodrome,” “The Fly,” “Naked Lunch,” and “A History of Violence,” David Cronenberg was just a 23-year-old University of Toronto student with a English Literature and Language degree on the horizon and a dream in his eye. And that’s where he was in life when he made his first six-minute short film, 1966’s “Transfer,” which Cronenberg wrote, directed, co-produced and co-edited. And those most familiar with his work may not exactly see the genius on hand, but they can most certainly notice the creative juices were flowing out of him even from an early age. The 16mm short, uncovered by Dangerous Minds, is, as one would expect, quite odd. From the first minute onward — featuring a man in the middle of barren, snow-glazed backcountry field of grassland brushing his »

- Will Ashton

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Watch: Sam Scoggins’ J.G. Ballard Short, The Unlimited Dream Company

11 February 2016 9:00 AM, PST | Filmmaker Magazine - Blog | See recent Filmmaker Magazine news »

Having just posted the trailer for Ben Wheatley’s upcoming adaptation of J.G. Ballard’s classic dystopian novel, High-Rise, now’s a good time to check out this considerably more obscure — yet, for fans of the British writer, equally rewarding — film. With a hat tip to Dangerous Minds, check out Sam Scoggins’ rather Ballardian author’s portrait, which mixes interview footage with both imagery and storytelling strategies drawn from Ballard’s work. »

- Scott Macaulay

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Listen: Spine Tingling Rejected Score For 'The Exorcist,' Plus Watch The Banned Trailer

1 February 2016 12:05 PM, PST | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

William Friedkin’s “The Exorcist” is still a profoundly terrifying experience forty-three years after its release. It sounds impossible, but it turns out that a minimalistic, chilling unused score written for the film might have made the bloody-cross-masturbating, green-pea-soup-projectile-vomiting experience even scarier than it already was. A piece on Dangerous Minds indicates that before Friedkin settled on primarily using Mike Oldfield’s “Tubular Bells” in the film, he tapped a composer whose previous work was not particularly known for sending chills down audience’s collective spines. That composer was Lalo Schifrin, who had previously written scores for “Dirty Harry” and “Cool Hand Luke,” as well as the brain worm theme tune to “Mission: Impossible.” Unfortunately, Friedkin decided not to use Schifrin’s score. Read More: Watch: Incredible Vintage Footage Of Audience Reactions To 'The Exorcist' In 1973  So what happened? An educated guess would be that »

- Oktay Ege Kozak

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Weekly Rushes. 13 January 2016

14 January 2016 9:52 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Rushes collects news, articles, images, videos and more for a weekly roundup of essential items from the world of film.NEWSJust have celebrating his 69th birthday and releasing a new album, David Bowie has left us. (The wonderful gif above is by Helen Green, via Dangerous Minds.)Dalian Wanda buys Legendary Entertainment: For the oh-so-reasonable price of $3.5 billion, the Chinese company which already owns American cinema chain AMC has bought the Hollywood production company. Some may remember this company because of its announcement to create the lavishly funded Qingdao Film Festival, directed and programmed by several Americans.Mia Hansen-Løve's Things to Come.More titles have been announced for next month's Berlin International Film Festival. Most exciting to us are new films by Lav Diaz, Mia Hansen-Løve, and André Téchiné. (And there's a wonderfully Ralph Fiennes-full new trailer for the Coen brothers' opening night film, Hail Caesar!) Meanwhile, the »

- Notebook

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2007 | 2003 | 2002

9 items from 2016


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