7.7/10
57,318
235 user 71 critic

The City of Lost Children (1995)

La cité des enfants perdus (original title)
A scientist in a surrealist society kidnaps children to steal their dreams, hoping that they slow his aging process.
Reviews
Popularity
4,206 ( 276)

Watch Now

From $2.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

ON DISC
2 wins & 11 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Delicatessen (1991)
Comedy | Crime
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.7/10 X  

Post-apocalyptic surrealist black comedy about the landlord of an apartment building who occasionally prepares a delicacy for his odd tenants.

Directors: Marc Caro, Jean-Pierre Jeunet
Stars: Marie-Laure Dougnac, Dominique Pinon, Pascal Benezech
Action | Comedy | Crime
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.2/10 X  

A man and his friends come up with an intricate and original plan to destroy two big weapons manufacturers.

Director: Jean-Pierre Jeunet
Stars: Dany Boon, André Dussollier, Nicolas Marié
Drama | Mystery | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.7/10 X  

Tells the story of a young woman's relentless search for her fiancé, who has disappeared from the trenches of the Somme during World War One.

Director: Jean-Pierre Jeunet
Stars: Audrey Tautou, Gaspard Ulliel, Jodie Foster
Brazil (1985)
Drama | Sci-Fi
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8/10 X  

A bureaucrat in a retro-future world tries to correct an administrative error and himself becomes an enemy of the state.

Director: Terry Gilliam
Stars: Jonathan Pryce, Kim Greist, Robert De Niro
Dante 01 (2008)
Sci-Fi | Thriller
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 4.9/10 X  

Deep space, at the edge of the galaxy. The future. A new prisoner arrives on top security prison ship and psychiatric research unit Dante 01. Sole survivor of an encounter with an alien ... See full summary »

Director: Marc Caro
Stars: Lambert Wilson, Linh Dan Pham, Dominique Pinon
Foutaises (1989)
Short | Comedy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.8/10 X  

A 9 minute comedy starring Dominique Pinon (Delicatessen). Featuring muted colors with a sepia black and white, Pinon takes the viewer through various examples of what he "likes and ... See full summary »

Director: Jean-Pierre Jeunet
Stars: Dominique Pinon, Chick Ortega, Marie-Laure Dougnac
Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
One
Daniel Emilfork ...
Judith Vittet ...
...
...
Geneviève Brunet ...
Odile Mallet ...
Mireille Mossé ...
Serge Merlin ...
...
...
Joseph Lucien ...
Mapi Galán ...
Briac Barthélémy ...
Pierre-Quentin Faesch ...
Edit

Storyline

Set in a dystopian society, someone is kidnapping the children. Krank and his band of clones are using the children to harvest their dreams. Then they kidnap Denree, the brother of One, a fairground strongman. One sets out to find his brother. Written by grantss

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

children | dream | aging | girl | rescue | See All (97) »

Taglines:

Where happily ever after is just a dream. See more »

Genres:

Fantasy | Sci-Fi

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for disturbing and grotesque images of violence and menace | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
Edit

Details

Country:

| |

Language:

|

Release Date:

15 December 1995 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The City of Lost Children  »

Box Office

Budget:

$18,000,000 (estimated)

Gross:

$1,513,028 (USA)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

|

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Marc Caro: [Dark post-apocalyptic atmosphere] See more »

Goofs

The words from The Original that Miette remembers in flashback (after she receives Uncle Irvin's dream message) differ slightly from what The Original actually said, although the point of the message is still the same. See more »

Quotes

[after Mlle. Bismuth has been harpooned]
Clone: Does it hurt?
Mlle. Bismuth: Yes, I'm allergic to steel.
See more »

Connections

Referenced in GUNSHIP: Tech Noir (2015) See more »

Soundtracks

Who Will Take Your Dreams Away
Lyrycs and performed by Marianne Faithfull
Music and poduced by Angelo Badalamenti
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more (Spoiler Alert!) »

User Reviews

M. Perlman parle francais aussi!
16 May 2003 | by (Houston, TX CSA) – See all my reviews

"City of Lost Children" is a beautifully-realized if derivative dark fantasy in which a mad scientist named Krank, aided by a half-dozen clones, a midget woman, and a brain in a tank, abducts children to his offshore lab so he can steal their dreams. Seems he's unable to have any of his own. A sideshow strongman, played by a radiantly fit Ron Perlman, goes in search of his little brother, who has been taken by Krank's goons. Perlman, in another of his growing gallery of bizarre roles, is a perfect example of why I like character actors better than big-name stars. And how many languages does he speak, anyway? French here, Spanish (and English, of course) in "Cronos"; polyglot in "The Name of the Rose"; what next?

The strongman, named One, enlists the aid of Miette, a homeless, streetwise girl who, along with her fellow urchins, is part of a ring of thieves employed by a pair of sinister female Siamese twins named the Octopus. (Watch carefully how these evil twins smoke a cigarette. There are more weird characters per square inch in this flick than anywhere else outside a Heironymus Bosch painting.) Miette is played by Judith Villet, whose gonna-be-a-great-beauty looks, her air of intelligence and experience beyond her years, make her a sort of Gallic Natalie Portman.

Anyway, that's the plot: rescue little brother from the mad doctor. The images are the thing: with its rendering of a bleak, low-tech retro-future, "City" looks more like a Terry Gilliam movie than "Twelve Monkeys" does! And it slyly slips in ideas and images from other sources, to good effect: Krank himself is as much of the mad-doctor stereotype as is the character in "The Nightmare Before Christmas"; his outlandish electro-headgear is similar to that used in Disney's "Merlin Jones"; a nightmare on the loose swoops low along the ground through streets and alleys as a trail of green mist, improving on a similar image from "Bram Stoker's Dracula"; there's a confrontation in dreamland a la the "Elm Street" series; and while the idea of a brain in a tank isn't a new one, this is the first benign one I've ever seen. Familiar or not--and I'm thinking also of "The 5,000 Fingers of Dr. T"--"City of Lost Children" is still engaging, enjoyably weird, fantastic and funny, helped greatly by the fact that One and Miette are so endearing. The pace is a tad slower than it might have been. But this is, after all, a French movie.


27 of 32 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page