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Halloween 2017: Devil’s Night Double Feature – The Crow and House Of 1000 Corpses

  • DailyDead
[To get you into the spooky spirit, the Daily Dead team is spotlighting double features that we think would be fun to watch this Halloween season. Check here for more double feature recommendations and other Halloween 2017 coverage.]

In horror movies, things usually go so very wrong on October 31st when it comes to the Halloween-themed offerings of the genre. But what about the night before? October 30th, or “Devil’s Night”, can also bring about its own horrific consequences, which is the theme I went with when it came time to put together my double feature of Alex ProyasThe Crow and Rob Zombie’s House of 1000 Corpses. Both are coincidentally feature film debuts for each director, they feature killer soundtracks, and this pair of films is also centered around a storyline where the characters will never be the same after their experiences on the night before Halloween.

Based on the comic by James O'Barr, The Crow finds aspiring rock star Eric Draven (Brandon Lee) rising from the grave a year after his death to take revenge on the four thugs (David Patrick Kelly, Angel David,
See full article at DailyDead »

As ‘Patti Cake$’ Stumbles, Fox Searchlight Faces a Battle To Remain on Top

As ‘Patti Cake$’ Stumbles, Fox Searchlight Faces a Battle To Remain on Top
Standing before the packed house at Manhattan’s Metrograph Theater, “Patti Cake$” director Geremy Jasper introduced his film. He was excited, in the way that first-time directors often are at their premieres, thanking his producers, his cast, his reps — but the most heartfelt thanks went to distributor Fox Searchlight. Not only did it make his Jersey girl-rapper tale one of the biggest buys of the 2017 Sundance Film Festival, but it also represented a genuine dream come true. When the “Patti Cake$” team imagined their ideal distributor, he said, they agreed that nothing could be better than becoming a Fox Searchlight movie.

Headstones in the graveyard of studio specialty divisions include Warner Independent, Picturehouse, Fine Line Features, Paramount Classics, Paramount Vantage, and beyond. However, Fox Searchlight has persevered, and succeeded, for more than 20 years: Savvy, innovative, and astute, it’s known for its skill in finding acquisitions that reached audiences beyond the arthouse.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

As ‘Patti Cake$’ Stumbles, Fox Searchlight Faces a Battle To Remain on Top

As ‘Patti Cake$’ Stumbles, Fox Searchlight Faces a Battle To Remain on Top
Standing before the packed house at Manhattan’s Metrograph Theater, “Patti Cake$” director Geremy Jasper introduced his film. He was excited, in the way that first-time directors often are at their premieres, thanking his producers, his cast, his reps — but the most heartfelt thanks went to distributor Fox Searchlight. Not only did it make his Jersey girl-rapper tale one of the biggest buys of the 2017 Sundance Film Festival, but it also represented a genuine dream come true. When the “Patti Cake$” team imagined their ideal distributor, he said, they agreed that nothing could be better than becoming a Fox Searchlight movie.

Headstones in the graveyard of studio specialty divisions include Warner Independent, Picturehouse, Fine Line Features, Paramount Classics, Paramount Vantage, and beyond. However, Fox Searchlight has persevered, and succeeded, for more than 20 years: Savvy, innovative, and astute, it’s known for its skill in finding acquisitions that reached audiences beyond the arthouse.
See full article at Indiewire »

'Film Hawk' Reflects on Bob Hawk's Life Well-Lived Through American independent Cinema

Bob Hawk is the Pierre Rissient of American Independent Films. Pierre was for French cinema what Bob is to American independent cinema. When he discovered a film and told Cannes about it, Cannes programmed it. Those who know Pierre and those who know Bob know that their influence cannot be quantified by the number of films they have fostered in one way or another. Bob’s influence extends in innumerable ways throughout the independent film world. Independent films are Bob Hawk's life, and now his life is an independent film.

After the thrill of watching the documentary “Film Hawk” by Jj Garvine and Tai Parquet whose first, ever-so-shocking film “Keeping the Peace” in 2009 was about the brutal and first such beheading in Iraq, I was whisked off to lunch with Bob and the filmmakers Jj Garvine and Tai Parquet. It seemed as if our lunch were a continuation of the film, so alive and vivid was the film and so full of references and ideas was our conversation.

We immediately began a non-stop talk of passionate love for movies. Bob showed me the tee shirt he wore just for our lunch, a Filmmaker Magazine tee from the early days when Indiewire’s offices were upstairs in the Filmmaker offices. In all the scenes of this film, his tee shirts are remarkable for titles he primarily has worked on or been somehow attached to. He must have hundreds of such mementos of his life.

So how did you make this film? I finally asked, because even if this is “the usual sort of question we get” according to Jj, it is really of interest to me.

Jj and Tai ‘s first film, “Keeping The Peace”, premiered and won the Audience Award at the 2009 Philadelphia Independent Film Festival and went on to be selected for the PBS Pov "United States of Documentaries” series. They are often indistinguishable themselves in their simultaneously answering questions or commenting on the talk. “We decided to make this movie on the day before his 74th birthday when we all went to the IFC Center in New York to see the Spalding Gray movie by Steven Soderbergh. We had a three hour dinner and learned so much about Bob. We then met Soderbergh. Going home we thought his life would make a great story. We knew him because he helped us with our film ‘Keeping the Peace’ but we had never talked about anything but the movie at that time. We said to him, ‘What if we made a short about your life?’ He said ‘What?’ And that was it.

Film Hawk” itself is a broad swatch of a life well-lived with honesty and integrity. Surrounded by loving family and friends – although he and his brother as boys fought hard and often with each other as they grew up in very different ways. Bob veered toward art and his brother toward sports. Bob knew at an early age he was gay but his brother was strictly sports and girls. They were the sons of a minister, a minister who preached love. Their mother was a copy editor and proofreader – initially of insurance documents -- and Bob credits her with his own love for editing and proofreading. He proofread auction catalogs and the Sharper Image catalog at one point in his life.

Bob: “My mother, who lived to be 97, was a proofreader to the end. She edited and proofed the monthly newsletter of the home in which she lived in good health until she died. In fact, she proofread the April edition of the home’s newsletter, the very month she died.”

He did not like having to be the exemplary son of a minister and he had a stutter. At one point, hearing his father’s oratorical voice in the church, he realized there was a thin line between the church and theater and he choose theater as a young child and he credits his father for his love of dramaturgy and theater.

When he acted, his stutter disappeared and so he acted, though he much preferred working behind the scenes.

Our conversation switched between talk of film and talk of Bob the man. For he is incredibly full of love and life, a man whose boundaries include public and private love and film in one full embrace.

Bob grew up loud and proud, working as a techie Off Broadway in New York City. Even as a high school student he often went to New York City and explored both live theater and underground movies like Jean Genet’s “Un Chant d’Amour” and Kenneth Anger’s “Scorpio Rising”. Those were the predecessors to independent movies, he says.

Eventually he moved to stage managing in San Francisco where he met filmmaker Rob Epstein and contributed his thoughts to the seminal gay-themed documentary “Word Is Out”, made by a film collective that included Rob.

Tai: “Bob was an activist and that led him to film. In 1976 ,when the five hour rough cut of “Word is Out” was previewed for the public in a work-in-progress screening, Bob’s notes as a member of the audience were volumes of comments. In 1978 when Mayor George Moscone and Supervisor Harvey Milk were shot and killed by another supervisor, he and Rob, with whom he had become friends, both knew a film had to be made, but it took five years of grassroots fundraising.

Bob: “Rob and producer Richard Schmiechen initially went to Kqed, San Francisco’s public television station, but they turned it down, saying the story was too local. So they went to Wnet in New York, who provided funding for a one hour version. Then we realized that ‘The Times of Harvey Milk’ needed to be a feature, so we went again to Wnet and they gave us the additional money. This was the first film I worked on, as print media researcher and archivist.”

Jj: “Bob researched not only Harvey Milk but the whole era.”

Bob: “I had volumes -- over 600 news and magazine articles -- all organized by 20 main topics like Harvey Milk, George Moscone, Trial, Verdict, Riot, Gay Climate, Dan White and they were cross referenced, so when we had to speak about any subject, we had it ready.”

Says Tai , “Bob’s emphasis is always on storytelling. He even has a sense of arc in his copy editing.”

Tai thought he was a great writer, but Bob is not so sure.

Says Jj : “Bob is not good at original copy because he’s such an editor himself.”

Bob: “Yes, when I write, I feel my editor self looking over my shoulder.”

“The weakness of some narrative indies is that the filmmakers are so eager to shoot that they do not fully develop the script beforehand.”

So Bob is the articulate but silent spokesman for indies, always behind the scenes, editing and tightening scripts, reading copy and imperceptibly influencing a vast body of independent film today.

Tai: “He is like a drop of water in a small stream which he knows runs to the sea and which affects the very water of the ocean.

“Bob is not about connections. He’s about connection.”

There was so much research done for Film Hawk, you must have worked very hard.

Jj: We just listened to Bob and followed all the leads he gave us.

Tai: “Bob is not associated as strictly ‘gay’ or for gay films only. You can see that in his long term relationship to ‘Brothers McMullen’ in the film, but homosexuality is as intrinsic to him as is his whole childhood. He is secure in himself as a person”.

Bob Hawk’s keen insights and feedback became the precious wind that provided flight for many filmmakers. This fiery, eccentric fairy Godfather of indie film not only battled depression, but was the first to discover and champion the talents of Kevin Smith (“Clerks”, “Chasing Amy”), Edward Burns (“The Brothers McMullen”, “Purple Violets”), Ira Sachs (“Keep The Lights On”, “Love Is Strange”) and Scott McGehee and David Siegel (“The Deep End”, “What Maisie Knew”).

Here are what a few have to say about him:

"I didn't ever consider myself an artist, I was just a guy who wanted to make ‘Clerks’, until Bob Hawk started talking about it."

- Kevin Smith

"Bob was always there to encourage me. Bob is a friend and a mentor"

- Ed Burns

With his 30+ year Sundance presence - including work as consultant, programmer, moderator, juror, and impassioned viewer - usually seated front-row and often asking the first question (as in the case of the “Sex, Lies and Videotape” world premiere) Bob deserves kudos and honors and yet has never sought the spotlight for himself.

Not only is this a film about film, but about a man who is as intrinsic to indie films as is the drop of water in a stream that goes into the ocean, but this film should also stand up in educational venues – whether about filmmaking or about standing proud as a gay man in the world.

In many ways this film recalls the classic “Bill Cunningham” that Zeitgeist had such success with in that both films are quintessentially New York films about men whose calling is their life-long love; each is a living example of the importance of love for one’s self and for one’s life lived with passion. “Film Hawk” deserves to be seen at the IFC Center, in the center of New York.

Bob grew up in that time in the 50s when to be gay meant very little to society. Gay men married, had children and if they were lucky they did not find their dual role in life unsettling. He was just at the edge and realized he did not have to go the marriage route and have children, and so he went the art route and his children are numerous.

Bob will be speaking at the Berlinale Queer Academy during the 30th Anniversary of the Teddy Awards and a clip of the film will accompany him. He is also receiving a Maverick of the Year Award from Cinequest this month.
See full article at Sydney's Buzz »

Film Review: ‘Film Hawk’

Film Review: ‘Film Hawk’
The name Bob Hawk may not be familiar beyond independent circles, but as an early champion of filmmakers like Kevin Smith, Edward Burns, Rob Epstein, and Scott McGehee and David Siegel, he’s been an important guy-behind-the-guy, with good instincts for talent and sage advice for newcomers. The affectionate documentary “Film Hawk” gives Hawk a well-deserved curtain call, but feels like the sort of half-realized project he’d send back for retooling. Though directors Jj Garvine and Tai Parquet have rounded up numerous filmmakers to speak on his behalf, Hawk himself remains an elusive figure, utterly winning but not so readily drawn into the spotlight. After Sundance, other American festivals stand to give the consultant an ovation, but “Film Hawk” won’t travel far beyond the micro-indie circles whence it came.

Garvin and Parquet open the doc with its most affecting scene, as Smith tearfully recalls Hawk’s crucial role
See full article at Variety - Film News »

'Public Morals': Ed Burns on Making TV's 'Irish-American 'Godfather''

'Public Morals': Ed Burns on Making TV's 'Irish-American 'Godfather''
When Ed Burns was a kid, he remembers his relatives giving him pictures of his great grandfather, these grainy black-and-white shots that hinted at a wild, we-make-our-own-rules-here past. "He's standing on the roof of his place in Hell's Kitchen, with giant scissors in his hand," the writer-director says, sipping a Guinness in a Tribeca bar near his home. "And he's about to cut the ears of his champion fighting pitbull, this beast with a muzzle on. I asked my dad, what's the deal here exactly? Seems the old man was in the trucking business,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Public Morals Review – TV TNT

There aren’t a lot of people who can pull off writer/director/actor in the first place, but among those who can pull it off, they need to find an exact fit. Edward Burns shot out of the gates with The Brothers McMullen 20 years ago, and he’s been trying to find the sweet spot again ever since, and without much luck.

His work mostly hasn’t been bad, but it hasn’t been great (though The Fitzgerald Family Christmas came close), and it has seemed a result of trying to make niches work when there wasn’t truly a lot of potential.

Though Burns only acted in Mob City, it apparently tuned him into a niche he could work with.

With Public Morals, Burns is back in the everything chair, and now he has exactly the right team with him, and though he kicks off slightly cheesy, once
See full article at AreYouScreening »

Edward Burns Explains How Martin Scorsese, Steven Spielberg and 'Game of Thrones' Influenced His (Great) First TV Series, 'Public Morals'

Edward Burns Explains How Martin Scorsese, Steven Spielberg and 'Game of Thrones' Influenced His (Great) First TV Series, 'Public Morals'
For the last decade or so, you probably know Edward Burns as one of two people: The first is that charming New Yorkah who pops up in romantic comedies like "The Holiday," "27 Dresses," "Friends With Kids" and even "Will & Grace." He's snagged a few roles as cops in a couple of studio flicks, as well, but he's a tried and true "Prince Charming"-type for anyone who loves a thick Queens accent. That person, though, is Edward Burns, Studio Actor. Far more interesting to the indie community and film fans at large is Edward Burns, Writer, Actor, Producer and Director. Since his debut film, "The Brothers McMullen," took home the Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival in 1995, Burns hasn't stopped writing — and directing, and producing, and acting and more. He's been pumping out character-driven indie films for two decades now, and helping push VOD distribution into the mainstream along the way.
See full article at Indiewire »

'Public Morals': TV Review

'Public Morals': TV Review
We’ve seen all this before: The coppers, sworn to uphold the law, who often abuse their power. The robbers at war with both the ball-busting flatfoots and the power-hungry factions within their own criminal organization. An unseasoned rookie who got his job through nepotism. Sass-talking streetwalkers, several of ’em with hearts of gold. Wives who love and stand by their men (most of the time). There’s something comforting in the way multihyphenate director-star-creator Edward Burns — who made indie-film waves with his 1995 Sundance Grand Jury Prize winner The Brothers McMullen — embraces all of the

read more
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Connie Britton Is Working On A Documentary About Ethiopian Orphans And Other Things You Didn't Know About Her

Connie Britton Is Working On A Documentary About Ethiopian Orphans And Other Things You Didn't Know About Her
1. I rescued my dog Lucy after she tried to go home in someone’s car and was left in the Hollywood Hills. 2. I rescued my dog Josephine in Austin on my way to a Black Crowes concert. Her name comes from their song “Oh Josephine.” Photos: Hot Hunks Walking Dogs 3. I am allergic to eggplant. 4. I played Dolly in my high school production of Hello, Dolly when I was 16. 5. The first movie I did was The Brothers McMullen. It won the Grand Jury Prize at Sundance in [...]
See full article at Us Weekly »

Avalanche casts three leads for an October shoot in Houston

Maxine Bahns (The Brothers McMullen, Cutaway, Charlie Valentine) and Aaron Farb (Powers, Kill The Messenger) have joined SAG nominee Stelio Savante (Eisenstein In Guanajuato, A Million Colours, Ugly Betty) in the lead cast of Todd L. Green’s dramatic-thriller Avalanche.

The indie feature is scheduled to begin lensing in Houston in October and tells the story of a librarian (Savante), his wife (Bahns), and her lover (Farb), who find themselves trapped in a house together and having to navigate the chaotic fallout of their indiscretions.

Writer-director Green was the recipient of a 2015 Houston Arts Alliance Individual Artist Grant and was also awarded Best Director at the 2013 Ifq Festival for Louis Grant, a seri series he co-created, produced and directed. He will be using a mostly Texas based crew and working with the local community to promote Houston as a filming location.

Savante will next be seen in the AMC mini-series
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Cast Announced for Indie Film Avalanche

Cast Announced for Indie Film Avalanche
Indie movie news broke with the announcement of the cast of upcoming film “Avalanche.” The film, which is not about a natural disaster, stars Maxine Bahns (“The Brothers McMullen,” “Cutaway,” “Charlie Valentine”), Aaron Farb (“Powers,” “Kill The Messenger”) and Screen Actors Guild nominee Stelio Savante (“Eisenstein in Guanajuato,” “A Million Colours,” “Ugly Betty”) and is directed by Todd L. Green. So, if the film isn’t about a real avalanche, then what is it about? As it turns out, the film is a thriller that involves the consequences of bad behavior coming to the surface. “In Avalanche, a librarian (Savante), his wife (Bahns), and her lover (Farb) find themselves trapped in [ Read More ]

The post Cast Announced for Indie Film Avalanche appeared first on Shockya.com.
See full article at ShockYa »

The 36 Best Irish Movies, in Honor of St. Patrick's Day

As St. Patrick's Day approaches, you want Irish green not just in your garments or your beer, but in your movies, too. A quarter-century ago, it would have been nearly impossible to compile a decent list of Irish movies, but then the Emerald Isle enjoyed an explosion of talent in the 1990s, led by such filmmakers as Jim Sheridan and Neil Jordan and such actors as Stephen Rea and Brendan Gleeson.

Today, there's a rich catalog of Irish movies to choose from. To maintain focus, we've kept this list restricted to films made in Ireland or at least set there. (Movies about Irish folks abroad, like "In Bruges," or their descendants in America, from "Far and Away" to "The Brothers McMullen" to "The Departed," will have to wait for another St. Patrick's Day.) Certain tropes reappear often -- glib talkers, hard drinkers, green fields, stern priests, mythical creatures, fanatical Irish Republican Army fighters,
See full article at Moviefone »

'Independent Ed' by Edward Burns a Primer for Riding the Industry Waves

'Independent Ed' by Edward Burns a Primer for Riding the Industry Waves
I first met writer-director-actor Edward Burns back at the start of his career at the 1995 Sundance Film Festival. Yes, I was at the first screening of "The Brothers McMullen," which vaulted him into a career in the movie business. But that story arc did not unfold as anticipated. It's no surprise that Burns is capable of writing a good book. For better or worse, this New York charmer has always had his own distinct voice. The reason "Independent Ed: Inside a Career of Big Dreams, Little Movies and the Twelve Best Days of My Life" (Gotham Books) is a must-read for any would-be filmmaker --and for many who are in the slough of despond as things don't go their way--is that Burns is a tough cookie who would not take no for an answer. One minute he was ebullient, showered with praise and promise, the next he was in the dumps,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Ed Burns' Advice For Making It In Hollywood: 'Be Passionate and Be Tenacious'

Ed Burns' Advice For Making It In Hollywood: 'Be Passionate and Be Tenacious'
Actor and director Edward Burns has over 25 films under his belt and credits with superstars like Jennifer Aniston and Tom Hanks, but, like many other success stories, he started out at the bottom of the Hollywood food chain.

News: Jon Hamm Gets By With Help From His 'Friends'

It was an early job as a production assistant at Entertainment Tonight and a chance encounter with Sundance Film Festival chairman Robert Redford, however, that set the young director on the road to Sundance and future success.

"Redford was doing the junket for Quiz Show," Burns told Et. "I, of course, was PAing that junket. I had my VHS copy of Brothers McMullen, a rough cut of the movie and you know I had a 30 second schpeel prepared. So the minute the interview ended, he would go to the elevator with his publicist and I was gonna cut him off and hand him my tape... Fortunately for me
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Amazon is Producing and Acquiring Movies That Will Play Theaters and Then Stream On Their Own Site

Until recently, my reason for paying for Amazon Prime was merely about being able to get diapers in two days without having to leave the house. The streaming service attached to that two-day-shipping deal was also good for my kid’s Dora the Explorer addiction, but that’s about it. Then Transparent came along and gave me something to watch “free” on Amazon Instant Video, too. As for movies, though, it’s never been of interest, especially since it hardly ever seems to have anything that Netflix doesn’t also have (by the way, they’ve noticed the concern enough to have a page for “Not on Netflix” offerings, including Under the Skin and Cheap Thrills), and anyway Netflix is a whole lot easier to watch on a mobile device or tablet. Amazon Studios is likely to develop more original series as good as Transparent or good enough, and given that they’ve already secured Woody Allen for
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Amazon Studios to Produce Original Movies for Theaters

Amazon Studios, known for television series such as multi-Golden Globe winner Transparent, Annie-nominated Tumble Leaf, and Mozart in the Jungle, today announced that it will begin to produce and acquire original movies for theatrical release and early window distribution on Amazon Prime Instant Video. Whereas it typically takes 39 to 52 weeks for theatrical movies to premiere on subscription video services, Amazon Original Movies will premiere on Prime Instant Video in the U.S. just 4 to 8 weeks after their theatrical debut. Amazon Original Movies will focus on unique stories, voices, and characters from top and up-and-coming creators. Here's what Roy Price, Vice President, Amazon Studios, had to say in a statement.

"We look forward to expanding our production efforts into feature films. Our goal is to create close to twelve movies a year with production starting later this year. Not only will we bring Prime Instant Video customers exciting, unique, and
See full article at MovieWeb »

2015 Sundance Film Festival Predictions List: An Introduction

Whether you are a filmmaker, or one of the Sundance programmers whose task it is to identify the films that make up a line-up, it is indeed the most wonderful, panic-filled and nerve racking time of the year. The 31st edition of the Sundance Film Festival kicks off on January 22nd with Park City and Salt Lake City playing host to some of the more innovative, thought-provoking narrative and non-fiction films of 2015. Last year, a Jenga tall order of 4,057 features and 8,161 shorts were submitted. Now let’s think about those numbers for a second.

Twenty years ago, Terry Zwigoff’s Crumb claimed the Grand Jury Prize Documentary award, Living in Oblivion‘s Tom Dicillo was honored with the Waldo Salt Screenwriting Award, and Edward Burns’ micro-budgeted The Brothers McMullen (there is a read-worthy, lively, eleventh hour account on how it was submitted to the fest in Ted Hope’s “Hope
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

20 Great Holiday Movies on Netflix Streaming

  • Moviefone
The holidays are almost upon us, and if you just can't wait to re-watch seasonal classics like "White Christmas" or "The Muppet Christmas Carol," they're available right now on Netflix. There are also a few Thanksgiving-themed movies you can stream, our favorite being, of course, "Planes, Trains and Automobiles."

There's something for almost every taste, whether you want something nice like an animated film for the kids or something very naughty, like "Bad Santa."

Thanksgiving Movies

1. "American Son" (2008) R

Nick Cannon stars as a young Marine who's just completed basic training and is about to ship out to Iraq: But first, he's home for a volatile four-day Thanksgiving with friends and family.

2. "The House of Yes" (1997) R

Parker Posey proves why she was the '90s Indie Movie Queen in this film where she plays a Jackie Kennedy-obsessed who is unreasonably jealous when her brother (Josh Hamilton) brings home
See full article at Moviefone »

Fox Searchlight Pictures 20th Anniversary Blu-ray Set Collects 20 Hit Indie Films

Celebrating two decades of cinematic innovation and excellence, Fox Searchlight Pictures 20th Anniversary Collection features powerful performances and direction by some of Hollywood’s most beloved actors and filmmakers. Each of the 20 iconic films featured in this one-of-a-kind collection was hand selected from Fox Searchlight’s impressive catalog based on considerations of timelessness, cultural impact, awards recognition and box office success. From sidesplitting comedies and riveting thrillers to unforgettable dramas, including Best Picture Academy Award® Winners Slumdog Millionaire (2008) and 12 Years a Slave (2013), these critically acclaimed movies have captured the hearts and imaginations of audiences around the world. Blu-ray Titles Include: ● The Brothers McMullen ● Garden...
See full article at The Daily BLAM! »
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