6.7/10
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43 user 32 critic

Blue in the Face (1995)

R | | Comedy | 13 October 1995 (USA)
Wayne Wang's follow-up movie to Smoke presents a series of improvisational situations strung together to form a pastiche of Brooklyn's diverse ethnicity, offbeat humor, and essential ... See full summary »

Writers:

(situations), (situations)

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ON DISC
2 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Pete Maloney
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Dot (as Roseanne)
Mel Gorham ...
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Bob
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Jerry (as Jose Zuniga)
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The John Lurie National Orchestra ...
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Sharif Rashed ...
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Storyline

Wayne Wang's follow-up movie to Smoke presents a series of improvisational situations strung together to form a pastiche of Brooklyn's diverse ethnicity, offbeat humor, and essential humanity. Many of the same characters inhabiting Auggie Wren's Brooklyn Cigar Store in Smoke return here to expound on their philosophy of smoking, relationships, baseball, New York, and Belgian Waffles. Most of all, this is a movie about living life, off-the-cuff. Written by Tad Dibbern <DIBBERN_D@a1.mscf.upenn.edu>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

First there was "Smoke." Now there's fire. Auggie and his friends are back with more out-of-this-world tales. See more »

Genres:

Comedy

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language and a scene of nudity | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

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Release Date:

13 October 1995 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Brooklyn Boogie  »

Box Office

Budget:

$2,000,000 (estimated)

Gross:

$1,275,999 (USA)
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Company Credits

Production Co:

,  »
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Technical Specs

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Sound Mix:

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Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

After initial filming wrapped, Paul Auster and Wayne Wang realized that the improvisational concept was not working. The directors requested three more days of additional filming in which all of the scenes were scripted. The scenes with Keith David and Madonna were scripted. See more »

Goofs

Dot bolts the store door to talk with Auggie, then leaves without unlocking it. See more »

Quotes

Bob: Coffee and cigarettes. That's like the breakfast of champions.
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Crazy Credits

Situations Created in collaboration with THE ACTORS See more »

Connections

References Clerks (1994) See more »

Soundtracks

Haym Afen Range
Performed by Don Byron
Traditional composition arranged by Mickey Katz
Published by Haimish Music (BMI)
Don Byron appears courtesy of Warner Brothers Records Inc.
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User Reviews

 
Joyful meditation about life
24 June 2004 | by (Hamburg, Germany) – See all my reviews

"Blue in the Face" was a fastly produced follow-up of director Wayne Wang's and writer Paul Auster's 1994 art house hit "Smoke". While "Smoke" was produced in the usual way with script, casts, etc., this movie was a quickly shot within less than a month, just containing vague ideas, interviews and improvisations with the same production unit and main actor Harvey Keitel, but without a script and with lots of popular supporting actors who were improvising their performance straight in front of the camera. And it works.

Focused on Keitel's smoke shop in Brooklyn, his customers and visitors are telling stories about their lives, views, ideas, dream, relationships and carreers, all focused around the topic of smoking. Lou Reed can't remember his first cigarette, but presents his self-constructed glasses, Jim Jarmusch celebrates his last cigarette, Harvey Keitel reminds which war movie made him a cigarette smoker, and there are several more famous guests in the shop. Michael J. Fox plays a weird insurance guy, Madonna appears as a singing telegram girl, and John Lurie, Mia Sorvino, Paul Keith and the whole NYC artist's scene appear on the screen.

Although the pointless composition of independent scenes and interviews might become a bit out of tune or boring sometimes, the movie works really well. There are lots of interesting (real life?) stories told by the actors, a great rare groove soundtrack that could fit into every Tarantino production, and some really good jokes too. "Blue in the Face" become a minor art house classic in Europe in the nineties, and one could wonder if this movie would have been the same ten years later in the times of anti-smoking laws and campaigns. Nice independent movie.


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