For centuries, each of the various martial arts disciplines declared its techniques superior to those of the competing combat arts. But there existed no forum in which to prove these claims... See full summary »
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Episodes

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Years



2   1  
1997   1996   1995  
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Cast

Series cast summary:
Herb Perez ...
 Olympus / ... 26 episodes, 1995-1997
Hakim Alston ...
...
Jamie Webster ...
 Great Wolf / ... 25 episodes, 1995-1996
Hien Nguyen ...
 Tsunami / ... 25 episodes, 1995-1996
...
 Red Dragon / ... 26 episodes, 1995-1997
Johnny Lee Smith ...
Michael Bernardo ...
Christine Rodriguez ...
 Lady Lightning / ... 23 episodes, 1995-1996
Hoyoung Pak ...
 Star Warrior / ... 23 episodes, 1995-1997
Richard Branden ...
 Yin Yang Man / ... 22 episodes, 1995-1996
Larry Lam ...
 Warlock / ... 22 episodes, 1995-1996
...
 Himself / ... 15 episodes, 1995-1997
Willie Johnson ...
...
 Herself - Host 13 episodes, 1995
...
 Herself / ... 12 episodes, 1995-1996
Michael M. Foley ...
 Tracer / ... 12 episodes, 1996
...
 Chameleon / ... 11 episodes, 1996
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Storyline

For centuries, each of the various martial arts disciplines declared its techniques superior to those of the competing combat arts. But there existed no forum in which to prove these claims. Finally, the grand masters set aside their differences and formed a governing body, The World Martial Arts Council to determine the greatest martial artist on earth. Written by Tim Kroll <tkroll@chs.cusd.claremont.edu>

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Sport

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Release Date:

1995 (USA)  »

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Did You Know?

Quotes

Tracey Swedom: It's like chess, you sacrifice a few pieces, and before you know it--checkmate.
Chamelion: Well that's putting a positive spin on things.
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

Never got its due respect...
20 December 2005 | by See all my reviews

As a former student of one of the "Masters", I was very disappointed to see the show dropped by Fox. Instead of watching stunt doubles in rubber suits fighting monsters in cardboard cities, WMAC took the stunt doubles and gave them personalities. Most of the characters were really based off of the actors' personas and nicknames. Add in some stories that were meant to inspire the good in young viewers (brothers helping one another, respect for others property, etc.) and this show was better than 90% of the drivel on Saturday mornings.

As the show was being shown, I had the opportunity to meet many of the stars and each of them really did care for young people. Here's hoping TV studios take some time and show respect to the families watching their shows instead of throwing the next violent and materialistic retread from Japan.


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