Martin Chuzzlewit (1994) - News Poster

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The BFI’s “Missing Believed Wiped” season gets horrific!

The BFI’s Missing Believed Wiped returns to BFI Southbank this December to present British television rediscoveries, not seen by audiences for decades, most since their original transmission dates…. The bespoke line-up of TV gems feature some of the countries most-loved television celebrities and iconic characters including Alf Garnett in Till Death Us Do Part: Sex Before Marriage, Cilla Black in her eponymous BBC show featuring Dudley Moore , Jimmy Edwards in Whack-o!, a rare interview with Peter Davison about playing Doctor Who, an appearance by future Doctor Who Patrick Troughton from ITV’s early police drama, No Hiding Place plus a significant screen debut from a young Pete Postlethwaite.

However for Nerdly readers, one of the real highlights of this edition of Missing Believed Wiped is the uncovering of TV horror Late Night Horror: The Corpse Can’t Play. Originally broadcast on 3 May, 1968 on BBC2 this is the only
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

UK Trailer Arrives For Festive Treat ‘The Man Who Invented Christmas’

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There’s no getting away from it – it’s getting closer and closer to Christmastime, and with it comes the flurry of Yuletide movies that will be lighting up your cinema screens over the next couple of months. One of them is The Man Who Invented Christmas, a film which tells the incredible story of how Charles Dickens came to write one of the most well-known stories in history, ‘A Christmas Carol’.

Dan Stevens, Christopher Plummer, Jonathan Pryce, Miriam Margolyes and Simon Callow, which tells the incredible story of how Charles Dickens came to write one of the most well-known stories in history.

In 1843, Dickens was a literary rock star, but struggling financially after the slow sales of his previous novel, Martin Chuzzlewit. Seized with the vision of a story that would fire the hearts of humanity, Dickens pitched his publishers, ‘A Christmas Carol’, but they passed. Desperate,
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When Tiny Tim met Little Nell: it’s the great Dickens TV mash-up

Tony Jordan, former chief scriptwriter on EastEnders, explains why he’s happy to risk the wrath of Dickens purists in the BBC’s 20-part Christmas showpiece

Is it Little Nell, or Tiny Tim on his crutch, or perhaps Bill Sikes with Bull’s-Eye the dog? Maybe it is Bleak House’s tenacious Inspector Bucket, or Mrs Gamp from Martin Chuzzlewit, with her furled umbrella? None would be exactly an unexpected caller in the run-up to Christmas. Charles Dickens’s highly recognisable characters have been endlessly repackaged for television audiences; but this year, for the first time, they will actually be meeting each other.

In BBC1’s key festive offering, Dickensian, Fagin, played by Anton Lesser, and Scrooge, played by Ned Dennehy, are to go head to head on the cobbled streets of a vast set, built inside an old factory in Greenford, west London.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

BBC’s ‘Dickensian’ To Interweave Classic Characters; Stephen Rea & More Cast

BBC’s ‘Dickensian’ To Interweave Classic Characters; Stephen Rea & More Cast
In a sort of super-literary-hero mash-up, filming has just begun on Dickensian, an ambitious 20-part BBC One period drama that brings together some of Charles Dickens’ most iconic characters. Stephen Rea has joined the cast as Inspector Bucket from Bleak House while Shirley Valentine Oscar nominee Pauline Collins is Mrs Gamp from Martin Chuzzlewit, and Caroline Quentin (Dancing On The Edge) plays Oliver Twist’s Mrs Bumble. SpooksPeter Firth and The Imitation Game‘s Tuppe…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Caroline Quentin, Peter Firth and more join BBC One's Charles Dickens drama

Caroline Quentin, Peter Firth and Pauline Collins have all been added to the cast of a new Charles Dickens drama.

The 20-episode series for BBC One has also cast BAFTA award winner Stephen Rea.

Dickensian brings together some of the writer's most iconic characters as their lives interweave in 19th Century London.

Characters from a range of classic tales will appear in the programme, including Scrooge, Fagin and Miss Havisham.

Rea, who plays Inspector Bucket from Bleak House, said: "Dickensian is the most beautiful re-working of the world of Dickens that you could ever imagine. The characters take on a fresh life, and any actor would be mad not to accept the challenge these great scripts offer."

Collins, who plays Martin Chuzzlewit's Mrs Gamp, added: "You don't need to know Dickens' novels to fall in love with the stories we're telling. It's going to be a real treat to watch.
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

10 years of new Doctor Who: nerdy in-jokes from series 1

From Autons to tribophysics via Kronkburgers, here's a pick of the best nerdy in-jokes and references from the 2005 series of Doctor Who...

Ten years ago, the world was about to be re-introduced to one of the most enduring and exciting television characters of all time, Doctor Who. The programme's new 2005 sheen brought with it a cheeky self-referential side (though it did do a bit of that in the 80s) and a knowingly raised pop culture eyebrow. From films such as E.T. to Barbarella to Star Trek to modern literature (The Lovely Bones) and icons (Michael Jackson) - everything was in the Time Lord’s gaze.

So let’s take our very own trip back in time and have a look at the more notable and interesting references and in-jokes from Doctor Who Series One, starring Christopher Eccleston and Billie Piper.

Rose

Most obviously, this opener saw the return of the
See full article at Den of Geek »

Sam Kelly obituary

Versatile stage and screen character actor loved for his roles in popular TV comedies

Equally at home in panto and Pinter, sitcom and Shakespeare, Sam Kelly, who has died of cancer aged 70, was a quirky, instantly recognisable character actor, often playing beyond his natural age, and often peering through rimless spectacles like a mole pushing through to the surface. And once there, he quipped and cavorted with the best of them: Dave Allen, Dick Emery and Paul Merton on television, and the Two Ronnies, with whom he toured onstage to Australia, having partnered Ronnie Barker in the sitcom Porridge as the illiterate conman Bunny Warren, who couldn't decipher the words "burglar alarm" when it most mattered.

He enjoyed a long-time collaboration with the director Mike Leigh, dating from a "wiped" BBC television film, Knock for Knock, in 1976, right through to Leigh's latest, Mr Turner, starring Timothy Spall as the great painter.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Six novelists on their favourite second artform

  • The Guardian - TV News
Writers often worry about the dangers of outside influence, but what about the non-literary inspirations they are far more comfortable admitting to? Andrew O'Hagan talks to six novelists about their passion for a second artform

The divine counsels decided, once upon a time, that influence is bad and that too much agency is the enemy of invention. Harold Bloom can't be blamed for that: he certainly pointed to the danse macabre of influence and anxiety, but to him the association was perfectly creative. Elsewhere, writers have always been blamed for being too much like other writers, or too much like themselves, and even now, in the crisis of late postmodernism, we find it hard to believe that writers might live happily in a state of influence and cross-reference. Yet anybody who knows anything about writers knows that they love their sweet influences.

What I've noticed, though, is that the influences
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Six novelists on their favourite second artform

  • The Guardian - Film News
Writers often worry about the dangers of outside influence, but what about the non-literary inspirations they are far more comfortable admitting to? Andrew O'Hagan talks to six novelists about their passion for a second artform

The divine counsels decided, once upon a time, that influence is bad and that too much agency is the enemy of invention. Harold Bloom can't be blamed for that: he certainly pointed to the danse macabre of influence and anxiety, but to him the association was perfectly creative. Elsewhere, writers have always been blamed for being too much like other writers, or too much like themselves, and even now, in the crisis of late postmodernism, we find it hard to believe that writers might live happily in a state of influence and cross-reference. Yet anybody who knows anything about writers knows that they love their sweet influences.

What I've noticed, though, is that the influences
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Keith Allen, actor – portrait of the artist

Actor Keith Allen talks about screaming popes, his daughter Lily – and the time he lived on a theatre stage

How did you get into acting?

I'd done performance art sporadically from about 1976 – very personal street things on my own. Acting seemed like a natural step from that. But I didn't really want to "be" anything: presenter, comic, actor. I just wanted to perform.

What was your big breakthrough?

I don't think I've ever broken through.

What do you consider your greatest achievement?

A one-man show I did years ago called Whatever Happened to the AA Man's Salute. It was improvised, and ran for three or four weekends at the then Albany Empire in London. I was a squatter at the time, so I moved into the theatre and lived on the stage. I'd do the show right next to my bed.

Do you suffer for your art?

Yes – as
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

5 Inspirational Ideas From The World of Alan Partridge

He might be a closed-minded, sexist, homophobic Daily Mail-reading bigot with alarming illusions of grandeur and a tendency to immediately alienate almost everyone he meets, but even a stopped clock shows the right time twice a day.

In the midst of his painfully bumbling and lethally awkward adventures, I do believe that it’s possible to glean some genuine inspiration from the life and opinions of Alan Partridge.

5. A Curiously Bright Outlook On Life

Alan Partridge’s career is a train wreck and his life is a disaster. He’s divorced, his children don’t want to see him, and at time of writing, he’s filling the mid-morning slot on a radio station that might not even be the biggest station in North Norfolk.

And yet, Alan’s outlook always seems to be bright and optimistic. He never got depressed. Rather, he was “officially fed up”. During his lowest ebb,

Tom Wilkinson: The full Tommy

Hadley Freeman wants to talk to Tom Wilkinson about awards, exotic locations and hanging out with Johnny Depp. But he just wants to talk about failure, lying low – and their shared hatred of jeans

'Maybe I want to pack acting in," says Tom Wilkinson, one of Britain's best-loved actors, in an endearingly rumpled voice. Why would you do that? You've been nominated for Oscars and you're about to fly off to start filming The Lone Ranger with Johnny Depp. Acting seems to be working out pretty well for you.

"Oh, I don't know," he replies, as casually as if he's just commented on the weather, as opposed to telling a journalist something that would give his agent a fit. "I haven't really thought about it in any coherent sense. I'm not a good traveller. I never used to mind all the time away from home, the hanging around, but now I think,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Tom Wilkinson: The full Tommy

Hadley Freeman wants to talk to Tom Wilkinson about awards, exotic locations and hanging out with Johnny Depp. But he just wants to talk about failure, lying low – and their shared hatred of jeans

'Maybe I want to pack acting in," says Tom Wilkinson, one of Britain's best-loved actors, in an endearingly rumpled voice. Why would you do that? You've been nominated for Oscars and you're about to fly off to start filming The Lone Ranger with Johnny Depp. Acting seems to be working out pretty well for you.

"Oh, I don't know," he replies, as casually as if he's just commented on the weather, as opposed to telling a journalist something that would give his agent a fit. "I haven't really thought about it in any coherent sense. I'm not a good traveller. I never used to mind all the time away from home, the hanging around, but now I think,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The Charles Dickens bicentennial is quite enough, already | Jenny Diski

Dickens novels should be savoured slowly, not overhyped by our anniversary-obsessed media

By two o'clock on New Year's Day in this Dickens bicentennial year, I already found myself wishing that either he or I had never been born. I'd accidentally caught the end of Charles Dickens' iPod on Radio 4, in which the presenter "re-imagined" the author's favourite tunes (who had imagined them before?) and notable Dickens heads vied anecdotally with each other to make us love the old curiosity writer even and ever more. I got to the off switch before the post-colonial reworking of Martin Chuzzlewit in Mumbai began.

Even before the year started, BBC TV's Songs of Praise was on the case with A Dickensian Christmas (at least no Dickens Christmas Carols from King's College Chapel). I've sat through three episodes of an eviscerated Great Expectations (great dress decay, even though I much preferred Martita Hunt's
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Jasper Fforde: Fantasy, Science Fiction and weirdness abound

  • doorQ.com
It’s hard to say what genre British author Jasper Fforde would be categorized as his work contains elements of metafiction, parody, and fantasy. Then there’s the profusion of literary words, allusions and the general play on traditional genres. Perhaps the best way to explain him and his novels is he’s the love child of Douglas Adams and Terry Pratchett, with Monty Python is his grandfather.

Once working in the British film industry as a focus puller for such movies as The Trial, Quills, GoldenEye, and Entrapment, he published his first novel, The Eyre Affair, in 2001 (after 76 rejections slips for one book that would be eventually be released in 2005). That book spanned a lot of genres, including fantasy, science fiction, mystery, satire, romance, and thriller. The Eyre Affair introduced the readers to “literary” detective Thursday Next. Set in an alternate/parallel England of 1985 it finds a country that
See full article at doorQ.com »

BBC to provide answer to Charles Dickens' final mystery

Dickens' unfinished novel, The Mystery of Edwin Drood, to be given latest plot twist in new BBC adaptation

Whodunnit? Was it the fog, the opium, the quicklime, the Ceylonese twin or his villainous uncle Jasper that did for Edwin Drood?

The BBC is about to finally provide an answer and expose the murderer, in a new adaptation of Charles Dickens' unfinished novel, The Mystery of Edwin Drood, to be screened this summer.

Dickens died in 1870, exhausted by overwork and his gruelling public performances, before he could reveal all.

He had finished two-thirds of the book, and caused Drood to vanish in mysterious circumstances, when the author had a stroke on 8 June and died the following day without regaining consciousness, leaving only a sketchy outline for the remainder of the novel.

The story will be completed this time by the film and television script writer Gwyneth Hughes, responsible for last
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Pete Postlethwaite obituary

Oscar-nominated British actor with a vast range who could move between comedy and tragedy with ease

The actor Pete Postlethwaite had a face that elicited many similes, among them "a stone archway" and "a bag of spanners". These unflattering descriptions, plus his tongue-twisting surname, would suggest an actor with a career limited to minor supporting roles. But Postlethwaite, who has died of cancer aged 64, played a vast range of characters, often leading roles, on stage, television and film.

He was at ease in switching the masks of tragedy and comedy. The working-class martinet father he played in Terence Davies's film Distant Voices, Still Lives (1988), which Postlethwaite credited as his big break, can be seen as paradigmatic of his career. Postlethwaite powerfully conveyed the father's double-sided nature: at one moment he is tenderly kissing his children goodnight, the next he is ripping the tablecloth off in a rage.

Postlethwaite was
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Pete Postlethwaite obituary

Oscar-nominated British actor with a vast range who could move between comedy and tragedy with ease

The actor Pete Postlethwaite had a face that elicited many similes, among them "a stone archway" and "a bag of spanners". These unflattering descriptions, plus his tongue-twisting surname, would suggest an actor with a career limited to minor supporting roles. But Postlethwaite, who has died of cancer aged 64, played a vast range of characters, often leading roles, on stage, television and film.

He was at ease in switching the masks of tragedy and comedy. The working-class martinet father he played in Terence Davies's film Distant Voices, Still Lives (1988), which Postlethwaite credited as his big break, can be seen as paradigmatic of his career. Postlethwaite powerfully conveyed the father's double-sided nature: at one moment he is tenderly kissing his children goodnight, the next he is ripping the tablecloth off in a rage.

Postlethwaite was
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Pete Postlethwaite: a career in clips

The actor Pete Postlethwaite died yesterday at the age of 64. We look back over his career in clips

It's difficult to know which is the more telling statement about Pete Postlethwaite, who died yesterday. That Steven Spielberg called him "the best actor in the world", after working with him on Jurassic Park sequel The Lost World. Or that Postlethwaite reacted to the praise with such dry deprecation: "I'm sure what Spielberg actually said was, 'The thing about Pete is that he thinks he's the best actor in the world.'"

A man with a face just made for immortalising on Mount Rushmore, Postlethwaite was an ensemble actor to his core; transparently decent and generous, hardly a limelight hogger. The role that first brought him to the attention of most people was Giuseppe Conlon, inmate dad to Daniel Day-Lewis's falsely imprisoned Guildford Four suspect Gerry in 1993's In the Name of the Father.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Pete Postlethwaite: a career in clips

The actor Pete Postlethwaite died yesterday at the age of 64. We look back over his career in clips

It's difficult to know which is the more telling statement about Pete Postlethwaite, who died yesterday. That Steven Spielberg called him "the best actor in the world", after working with him on Jurassic Park sequel The Lost World. Or that Postlethwaite reacted to the praise with such dry deprecation: "I'm sure what Spielberg actually said was, 'The thing about Pete is that he thinks he's the best actor in the world.'"

A man with a face just made for immortalising on Mount Rushmore, Postlethwaite was an ensemble actor to his core; transparently decent and generous, hardly a limelight hogger. The role that first brought him to the attention of most people was Giuseppe Conlon, inmate dad to Daniel Day-Lewis's falsely imprisoned Guildford Four suspect Gerry in 1993's In the Name of the Father.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »
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