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Three Colors: White (1994)

Trois couleurs: Blanc (original title)
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Second of a trilogy of films dealing with contemporary French society shows a Polish immigrant who wants to get even with his former wife.

Writers:

(scenario), (scenario) | 4 more credits »
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1 win & 3 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
...
Mikolaj
...
Jurek
Aleksander Bardini ...
Le notaire (The Lawyer)
Grzegorz Warchol ...
L'elégant (The Elegant Man)
Cezary Harasimowicz ...
L'inspecteur (The Inspector)
Jerzy Nowak ...
La vieux payson (The Old Farmer)
Jerzy Trela ...
Monsieur Bronek
Cezary Pazura ...
Le propriétaire du bureau de change (Bureau de Change Proprietor)
Michel Lisowski ...
L'interprète (The Interpreter)
Philippe Morier-Genoud ...
Le juge (The Judge) (as Philippe Morier Genoud)
Piotr Machalica ...
L'homme de haute taille (The Tall Man)
...
L'employé de banque (The Bank Employee)
Barbara Dziekan ...
La caissière (The Cashier)
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Storyline

Karol (Polish) marries Domininque (French) and moves to Paris. The marriage breaks down and Dominique divorces Karol, forcing him into the life of a metro beggar and eventually back to Poland. However, he never forgets Dominique and while building a new life for himself in Warsaw he begins to plot... Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Romance

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for some sexuality and language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

| |

Language:

|

Release Date:

10 June 1994 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Three Colors: White  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Box Office

Gross:

$1,464,625 (USA)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Eastmancolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Almost every shot in the movie contains at least one white object. See more »

Goofs

After the court-room scene, Karol Karol is throwing up, but we can't hear a "vomit splash", and there isn't vomit in the closet. See more »

Quotes

[Expecting to find valuables, the luggage thieves open the suitcase containing Karol]
First Thief: Fuck! It's alive!
Second Thief: What the fuck?
Third Thief: Pull him out!
See more »

Connections

Referenced in The 100 Greatest Films (2001) See more »

Soundtracks

To ostatnia niedziela
(This Last Sunday) (uncredited)
Music by Jerzy Petersburski and words by Zenon Frejdwald
Played on the comb by Karol in the subway
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more (Spoiler Alert!) »

User Reviews

 
Least favorite of the three, but doesn't stop it from being genius!
4 August 2006 | by (Canada) – See all my reviews

This is the second installment in probably the best trilogy ever created. Though this one is not as strong as its predecessor, it does offer a unique and stylistic way of looking at life. It's a dark comedy about acceptance, love and betrayal. Can one man really start over in a new place? Can he heal from the pain that his wife caused him? Like in "Blue", it questions such things but does not mention it as much as it visually suggests it. And while it's not as powerful or complex as "Blue", it does play as a very unique and flowing transition between the two more dominant and relevant films.

"White" is a story about a man named Karol Karol (Zbigniew Zamachowski), a professional Polish hair-cutter who marries a young and beautiful French woman. He moves to France to live with her, and not long after, she divorces him because he's unable to have sex. He then again leaves France in an attempt to start a new life and win Dominique's (Julie Delpy) heart back. While on his journey though, he gets incredibly lucky and becomes wealthy, then pretends he's dead and waits for Dominique to come in order for him to see if she still loves him.

This is of course a perfect plot for comedy and it makes a lot of room for silly, slapstick jokes. Kieslowski wants to emphasize on the philosophical aspect of the movie just as much as the comedy. He chooses element that represent freedom and life (the statue of the woman that reminds Karol of Dominique), and the post-communistic lifestyle of a born communist. There is both a lighthearted and a more dark, sinister quality about "White". It's a typical 'you love me so you can't forget me' film, but does not play out in your conventional clichéd way. And while this lighthearted moment is shown, a dark overtone is prevalent. For example, when Karol meets Mikolaj and tells him of his beautiful wife, he goes and voyeuristically points her out, only to find her in bed with another man. He calls her and tells her he loves her, but she puts the phone up to her mouth and moans as loud as she can.

I mention voyeurism because that is a very reoccurring theme in the movie. Even Julie from "Blue" acts like almost a spy as she walks into the courtroom while Karol and Dominique are privately settling their divorce. Kieslowski creates a very voyeuristic feel in the movie so that we as the audience feel like we are overlooking the lives of others. Unlike Hitchcock though, Kieslowski does this but does not make us feel guilty about it, since of course, we don't witness a murder!

In this second installment, "White" is a quiet reminder that you can have a great film without going too deep into the themes and symbolisms. I have to agree with most of the people that "White" is the weakest of the genre, but it is a tremendously genius transition movie, a sort of light presence in the other two more darker films.


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