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"Star Trek: The Next Generation" All Good Things... (TV Episode 1994) Poster

Trivia

Jump to: Spoilers (7)
Patrick Stewart and Jonathan Frakes are the only actors to appear in every episode of the series.
Picard, Worf and Data are the only crew members who participate in all three time periods (although Riker briefly appears on screen during 2364).
The future Data has gray hair, many cats (ironically, Brent Spiner hates cats) and can even use contractions now. He also seems emotional, suggesting he implanted Dr Soong's emotion chip, as in Star Trek: Generations (1994).
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The uniforms they wear in the past are the ones they wore in Star Trek: The Next Generation: Encounter at Farpoint (1987). They were less comfortable and tighter, as one can plainly see.
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In the future, Geordi no longer wears a VISOR. His eyes look similar to the optical implants he would gain in Star Trek: First Contact (1996). Geordi is also married to a Leah, possibly Dr. Leah Brahms, the warp field specialist from Star Trek: The Next Generation: Booby Trap (1989) and Star Trek: The Next Generation: Galaxy's Child (1991).
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Picard's captaincy of the Enterprise is approved by Admiral Norah Satie. Satie made an appearance in Star Trek: The Next Generation: The Drumhead (1991), where she and Picard were at odds with one another over her paranoid belief in a Starfleet conspiracy.
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Whoopi Goldberg was supposed to reprise her role as Guinan, but her film career kept her busy and so she was written out of the script.
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Cambridge still exists in the 24th Century, where Data now occupies the Lucasian Chair, previously held by scientific giants like Sir Issac Newton and Stephen Hawking. Data played poker with holographic versions of them in Star Trek: The Next Generation: Descent: Part 1 (1993).
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The USS Pasteur is named after Louis Pasteur, the French chemist who developed the first vaccine for rabies.
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The design of the USS Pasteur was based largely on very early draft designs of the original Star Trek (1966) Enterprise.
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When Q says "trek through the stars", it is the first time anyone has ever used that term in a Trek episode. Zefram Cochrane would later say "star trek" in Star Trek: First Contact (1996).
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There are parallels between this story and that of a 1979 Doctor Who (1963) episode, "City of Death," co-written by bestselling author Douglas Adams. Both feature a notion of time-splintering, the prevention of life evolving on Earth, and a scene of contemplating primordial ooze that will become the human race.
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We get to see the Season 1 observation lounge, including the golden replicas of past Enterprises on the wall. They featured during Seasons 1 to 4 but were subsequently removed.
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Outpost 23 is the nearest outpost to the Neutral Zone. We first learned of it in Star Trek: The Next Generation: Future Imperfect (1990). It is the key to all the Federation's defenses in the Neutral Zone.
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A starship Bozeman (named for author Brannon Braga's Montana hometown) is mentioned. It might be the same one from Star Trek: The Next Generation: Cause and Effect (1992), the ship released from a time loop after 90 years. Since both episodes are about time travel, this is a likely connection.
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The future computer voice is the same as the present (and past) one, Majel Barrett.
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In Star Trek: The Next Generation: Night Terrors (1991), Picard remembered his grandfather deteriorate from mental illness. In the future, his Irumodic Syndrome may make him die the same way.
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A line cut from the 2364 portion of the episode established Dr Selar as being aboard at the time, filling in for Dr Crusher before she joined the Enterprise crew.
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Brannon Braga thought this was the best script he'd ever written.
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The overall design for the USS Pasteur was heavily based on the design for the Daedalus-class starship. Both vessels have a spherical saucer section and forward-mounted nacelles.
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Q recalls describing Humans as a "dangerous, savage child-race" back in Star Trek: The Next Generation: Encounter at Farpoint (1987). This is accurate.
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Data begins a long and tedious rant about the meanings of "burn the midnight oil..." at one point in the past. This is reminiscent of earlier seasons where Data would go on at length about something and have to be stopped.
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There are some similarities to Q's last appearance in Star Trek: The Next Generation: Tapestry (1993) in so far as Picard is sent into the past and back to the present. The circumstances as well as the conclusion, however, are rather different.
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Admiral Nakamura's last appearance, albeit in an alternate reality that never happened. His last real appearance came in Star Trek: The Next Generation: Phantasms (1993).
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The future timeline takes place 25 years ahead of the present, which would be the year 2395.
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Jessel is played by Pamela Kosh, who previously appeared in Star Trek: The Next Generation: Time's Arrow: Part 2 (1992) as the equally cantankerous owner of a boarding house. That show was also a time travel story.
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Miles O'Brien reappears in Star Trek: The Next Generation (1987) for the first time since moving to Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (1993). Although he was in Star Trek: The Next Generation: Encounter at Farpoint (1987), he had a much smaller role and he wasn't even named. With half the Bridge crew still on Farpoint Station, his role has been expanded here to fill the gap no doubt.
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Another future development is that the Klingons have conquered the Romulan Empire, and the Neutral Zone has been dissolved. It seems the alliance between the Federation and the Klingon Empire has also ended, perhaps because the Empire is eager to expand its territories. This is a plot line explored for a time in Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (1993), when, thanks to Dominion interference, the Klingons break off their alliance with Starfleet. When the Dominion plans to take over the Alpha Quadrant, the Klingons cease hostilities with Starfleet.
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47-reference: In the future, Admiral Riker is stationed at Starbase 247.
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The futuristic uniforms of the crew would also appear in an alternate future in Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: The Visitor (1995).
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Q's last appearance in Star Trek: The Next Generation (1987) and his last (known) encounter with Captain Picard. Q would make three further appearances in Star Trek: Voyager (1995).
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Ships can go up to warp 13 in the future. This somewhat contradicts Star Trek: Voyager: Threshold (1996), where warp 10 was established as the barrier between warp and transwarp. However, this barrier was never again mentioned afterwards and may have been a one-off idea by the writers; or the warp scale has once again been changed in the future, just as it had been during the transition from Star Trek (1966) to Star Trek: The Next Generation (1987).
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Picard gets the idea for the tachyon scan from the future Data, and then suggests the same idea to the past and present Data. The same applies to the tomographic imaging scanner, but in reverse: the past Data suggests it to Picard, who passes on the idea to the present Data.
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This episode won the 1995 Hugo Award for Best Dramatic Presentation, the first Star Trek: The Next Generation (1987) episode to do so since Star Trek: The Next Generation: The Inner Light (1992) (1993). They are, in fact, the only two TNG episodes to have won this award.
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Early versions of the story included the Borg attack at Wolf 359 as a fourth main timeline.
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Denise Crosby, Colm Meaney and John de Lancie are the only actors besides the regulars to appear in the pilot episode Star Trek: The Next Generation: Encounter at Farpoint (1987) and the series finale. Although Crosby was a regular at the time of the pilot.
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Journey's End: The Saga of Star Trek - The Next Generation (1994) was mostly filmed during production on this episode. This led to friction amongst the cast and production team, including an argument between Patrick Stewart (exhausted from having directed the previous episode Star Trek: The Next Generation: Preemptive Strike (1994), as well as appearing heavily in this one) and a camera crew.
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The warp 5 speed limit (Star Trek: The Next Generation: Force of Nature (1993)) has obviously been abolished in the future, since ships can go to warp 13. This suggests that a method to stop warp drive destroying space has been found, although it is never brought up.
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The only Star Trek: The Next Generation (1987) episode adapted into a comic book.
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The third Q episode not to have Q's name in the title.
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The first time we see Tasha since Star Trek: The Next Generation: Yesterday's Enterprise (1990), again in a parallel timeline.
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A future rendering of the Caduceus can be seen in several places on the bridge of Beverly's ship, erroneously used for the Greek symbol for medicine. In actuality, the rod of Asclepius (one snake, one staff, no wings) is the correct Greek symbol for medicine.
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This takes place in 2364, 2370 and 2395.
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The Romulans in the future have come down with Terrellian plague. This disease is not to be confused with the Tarellian plague from Star Trek: The Next Generation: Haven (1987).
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When we see Q's "courtroom," there have been some changes made to it since Star Trek: The Next Generation: Encounter at Farpoint (1987). The golden figurines on Q's throne are new.
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The only Star Trek (1966) spin-off finale to not be directed by Allan Kroeker. He directed Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: What You Leave Behind (1999), Star Trek: Voyager: Endgame (2001) and Star Trek: Enterprise: These Are the Voyages... (2005).
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Production on Star Trek: Generations (1994) began while the episode was made. The scenes filmed were on the Enterprise-B set. After production wrapped on the series finale, the cast got a ten-day break before jumping back in to work on the film.
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When this episode was written, the drafts would often get mixed-up with those for Star Trek: Generations (1994). Meaning the stories would sometimes get confused with one another. The writers later admitted that of the two, All Good Things... was the superior effort.
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In between the documentary and the series finale, there was a viewers choice marathon that revealed the top 5 episodes picked by the fans.
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Entertainment Weekly ranked this episode #5 on their list of "The Top 10 Episodes" to celebrate the 20th anniversary of TNG.
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47 Reference - The DVD release lists this episode as #747.
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The main view-screen on the USS Pasteur is a redress of the Battle Bridge's view-screen on the Enterprise.
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Last show of Star Trek: The Next Generation (1987).
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The Pasteur has a spherical forward section, instead of the circular section common to ships in the present.
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The title is derived from the biblically inspired proverb "All good things must come to an end" and the expression "All good things come in threes".
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Spoilers 

The trivia items below may give away important plot points.

The last line of the series is spoken by Picard: "So five-card stud, nothing wild...and the sky's the limit."
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Worf and Deanna's romance, hinted at throughout the season comes to its fruition here. In the future we see, Deanna is dead, and she never got together with Worf. Probably because of Riker, who is clearly uncomfortable with it when he sees the two of them together in the present. This drove a wedge between them. The circumstances of her death are not known. The relationship between Worf and Deanna seems to have petered out because there is no mention of it in the films, and Riker and Deanna later married, as would Worf to Jadzia Dax in Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (1993). Worf may have discontinued the relationship out of respect for Riker.
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Q is correct that they never reached a verdict in Star Trek: The Next Generation: Encounter at Farpoint (1987), even though he let the Enterprise crew continue with their mission. This is mentioned sporadically throughout the series. In Star Trek: The Next Generation: Q Who? (1989), he claims that Picard was exonerated, but then in Star Trek: The Next Generation: True Q (1992), when Picard brings up the trial, Q implies the jury is still out on that. This is confirmed in the finale, where Q says that the trial of humanity is not over and will never end.
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The first time Picard comes to the senior staff poker game. An alien duplicate of Picard did it in Star Trek: The Next Generation: Allegiance (1990) but didn't join in. In both episodes, a crew member says Picard was always welcome to join. Also the only time where the entire senior staff play the poker game all at the same time.
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After its initial release as a 2-hour season finale, this episode was edited for syndication into two hour long episodes with some scenes deleted. These include: Geordi telling Picard about his wife Leah and his children while tending to the vines. A part of the exchange between Ambassador Picard and Worf at their initial encounter (after Worf has cursed until the moment he allows the Pasteur to cross the border). Deanna telling Picard about her former relationship with Riker, and Picard then trying to order a cup of Earl Grey. Part of the exchange between Picard and Tomalak. Beverly Picard doubting the reality of her ex-husband's claims during their discussion in her ready room. An important exchange on the Pasteur between Picard and Q, in the guise of an old man. Beverly Picard ordering Worf to signal their surrender during the Klingon attack. A crewman on the "future" Enterprise reporting that the cloaking device isn't functioning. Dr. Crusher tending to Geordi and Ogawa, before Picard enters sickbay. Parts of the scene where Q takes Picard to prehistoric France. A scene on the "future" Enterprise of Picard wandering through the ship and asking a low-ranked crewman the way to Ten Forward. And Picard thanking Q for his help at their final exchange. Also, a short recap "Last time on Star Trek: The Next Generation (1987)" was added to the beginning of the second part in place of the teaser.
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Nurse Ogawa's pregnancy, last mentioned in Star Trek: The Next Generation: Genesis (1994), resurfaces here. In an alternate timeline, the tachyon pulse from the ship's deflector responsible for the anomaly causes her to have a miscarriage. But once the anomaly collapses and time resets itself, this thankfully never comes to pass.
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In the future, Picard and Beverly get married and then divorced. Although a possible romance is hinted at before the end, it was never followed up in any of the films - perhaps to avoid the future seen here.
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See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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