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Kim Basinger To Appear At "L.A. Confidential" Screening In L.A., May 9

  • CinemaRetro
By Todd Garbarini

Curtis Hanson’s Academy Award-nominated film, L.A. Confidential (1997), celebrates its 30th anniversary this year and is the subject of an exclusive screening at Laemmle’s Ahrya Fine Arts Theatre. The 138-minute film, which stars Kevin Spacey, Russell Crowe, Guy Pearce, and Kim Basinger, will be screened on Tuesday, May 9, 2017 at 7:30 pm.

Please Note: Actress Kim Basinger, who won an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress, in addition to the Golden Globe and Screen Actor’s Guild Award for her role as Lynn Bracken, is scheduled to appear in person for a Q & A following the screening.

From the press release:

Part of our Anniversary Classics series. For details, visit: laemmle.com/ac.

L.A. Confidential (1997)

20th Anniversary Screening and Tribute to Oscar-winning writer-director Curtis Hanson

Q & A with Oscar-winning actress Kim Basinger

Tuesday, May 9, at 7:30 Pm at the Ahrya Fine Arts Theatre

Laemmle Theatres
See full article at CinemaRetro »

From the People Archives: Celebrate Author Robert James Waller’s Legacy with a Look Back at the Bridges of Madison County Movie

From the People Archives: Celebrate Author Robert James Waller’s Legacy with a Look Back at the Bridges of Madison County Movie
Celebrated author Robert James Waller has died at the age of 77. Take a look back at People’s 1995 cover story on Meryl Streep and her emotional role in the film adaptation of Waller’s The Bridges of Madison County.

In the final days of the five-week shoot of The Bridges of Madison County last fall, Meryl Streep did one of the many things she does better onscreen than anyone else: she cried. Filming an emotional scene in which her character struggles to say goodbye to her lover, the actress would show up on the set in Winterset, Iowa, at 9 in
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

A Look Back at Meryl Streep’s Record-Setting 30 Golden Globe-Nominated Roles

A Look Back at Meryl Streep’s Record-Setting 30 Golden Globe-Nominated Roles
Everyone talks about Meryl Streep’s record-setting number of Academy Award nominations, but perhaps even more impressive is the number of Golden Globe Award nominations she’s received: 30, as of this year, with her latest nod for Florence Foster Jenkins.

In fact, the Hollywood Foreign Press seems to be so enamored with Streep that they’ll give her a nomination for pretty much anything (even Mamma Mia!). And now, they’re finally giving her the Cecil B. DeMille Award for lifetime achievement in motion pictures.

In honor of Streep’s incredible feat — only Jack Lemmon has even come close, with
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

30 Nominations (and Counting!): A Look Back at Meryl Streep’s Record-Setting Golden Globes Run

30 Nominations (and Counting!): A Look Back at Meryl Streep’s Record-Setting Golden Globes Run
The 74th Golden Globe Awards are just around the corner, and Hollywood’s favorite golden girl is nominated once again!

Legendary actress Meryl Streep has scored a record-breaking 30th nod — more than any other actor in the history of the Globes. Since 1979, the actress has consistently racked up nods for her acting throughout her lengthy career. In fact, Streep has only been kept off the ballot just 12 years out of the 37 since her first nod — doubling up on nominations in 2003, 2009 and 2010.

Take a look back on her long history with the Globes, and a beginning steeped in tragedy.

Triumph Amid
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

'8 Mile' Director Curtis Hanson -- Generous Will Covers His Kid and Many More

  • TMZ
"8 Mile" director Curtis Hanson had a solid will in place before his September death that not only took care of his longtime companion and son, but also his extended fam and his movie biz. Curtis and partner Rebecca Yeldham never tied the knot but have a 12-year-old son together, and the Oscar winner left most of his estate to them, including a home in Laguna Beach. He set up a trust for Rebecca, the kid and several other family members.
See full article at TMZ »

Scenic Routes: The late Curtis Hanson staged a murder scene for the ages in L.A. Confidential

In Scenic Routes, Mike D’Angelo looks at key scenes, explaining how they work and what they mean.

When the sad news broke last week that Curtis Hanson died, it occurred to me that I’ve unconsciously associated Hanson with death for almost 20 years now. Odd, because his movies aren’t generally violent. Indeed, they aren’t generally anything, really, apart from “worth seeing.” (Notable exception: 2007’s poker drama Lucky You, which decisively contradicts its own title.) Hanson did make a string of thrillers in the early ’90s—Bad Influence, The Hand That Rocks The Cradle, The River Wild—but those are primarily tension machines; only Cradle has a decent body count, and its deaths are too cartoonishly lurid to rattle anyone. The rest of Hanson’s oeuvre is less bloody still, ranging from the teen sex comedy Losin’ It (starring a not-yet-famous Tom Cruise) to Eminem’s ...
See full article at The AV Club »

Director Curtis Hanson Dies at Age 71

One of the most celebrated film makers of the last four decades has died. Here’s how the New York Times reported it….

Curtis Hanson, the film director whose adaptation of the James Ellroy noir novel “L.A. Confidential” won him an Academy Award, died on Tuesday at his home in Los Angeles. He was 71.

The death was confirmed by Officer Jenny Houser, a spokeswoman for the Los Angeles Police Department. She said that officers had been called to the house shortly before 5 p.m., and that Mr. Hanson had died of natural causes.

Julie Mann, his business manager, said Mr. Hanson had been struggling for some time with a form of dementia.

Let’s take a look at his long career. His first screen credit is for helping to adapt H.P. Lovecraft’s short story in the 1970 American International Pictures’ The Dunwich Horror starring Sandra Dee and Dean Stockwell.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Curtis Hanson: A Craftsman Who, in Two Movies, Touched Greatness

Curtis Hanson: A Craftsman Who, in Two Movies, Touched Greatness
Directing movies, Quentin Tarantino has said, “is a young man’s game. Directors don’t really get better as they get older…I’ve been studying all these directors’ careers, and boy, you tell me the one I haven’t thought of and I’ll bow my head.” Tarantino is right. For the most part, directors don’t get better as they get older. (The rare ones remain just as good.) There are exceptions to that rule, however, and none may be more dramatic, in its way, than the career of Curtis Hanson, who died Tuesday at 71.

For a long time, he worked under the radar. Then, in his forties, when he’d achieved a certain medium-grade commercial success, it was for making a handful of serviceable if not exactly indelible genre movies: the yuppie exploitation noir “Bad Influence” (1990), which played — with an entertaining hint of crassness — off the Rob Lowe sex-tape scandal.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

R.I.P. Curtis Hanson

Last night, the cinematic world lost one of its own. Filmmaker Curtis Hanson passed away at the age of 71. The cause of death has been placed as natural causes. Hanson worked in the industry for well over 40 years, writing and directing movies that will stand the test of time. Oscar took notice in the late 90’s when Hanson made what most consider to be his masterpiece with L.A. Confidential, but he was a well known artist before then. He worked steadily on the big screen, also putting out the top notch HBO TV movie Too Big to Fail about five years ago. He will be missed in a big way. Hanson was an Academy Award winner and three time nominee, all for L.A. Confidential back in 1997. That highly regarded crime drama was a tale of corruption in the 1950’s, looking at how very different policemen dealt with enforcing the law.
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

Curtis Hanson Rip: 1945-2016

Curtis Hanson--Confidentially

By

Alex Simon

Curtis Hanson was my first interview with a fellow film buff and film journalist. He was nice enough to sit down with me twice, first at the Rose Cafe in Venice, then at a lunch spot in the Marina, the name of which has been lost to time. He was then kind enough to invite me to the world premiere of "L.A. Confidential" at the Chinese Theater as his guest, my first time on the red carpet at a real-life Hollywood premiere, and called me after this piece ran to thank me personally. A nice man. Hanson, and co-writer Brian Helgeland, would go on to win Best Adapted Screenplay Oscars for "L.A. Confidential."

Years later, I ran into Hanson at a book signing party for Pat York that was held in Westwood. I approached him and reminded him of our interview a decade or so earlier.
See full article at The Hollywood Interview »

Curtis Hanson, 8 Mile and L.A. Confidential Director, Passes Away at 71

  • MovieWeb
Curtis Hanson, 8 Mile and L.A. Confidential Director, Passes Away at 71
Curtis Hanson, a beloved director who made hit films such as 8 Mile and L.A. Confidential, passed away last night at the age of 71. While no cause of death has been confirmed, initial reports reveal the filmmaker was found dead in his Hollywood Hills home last night, from an apparent heart attack. However, an Lapd spokesperson would not confirm that information, stating he died of "natural causes."

Variety reports that paramedics responded to a call regarding an unconscious man at the director's Hollywood Hills home at 4:52 Pm. The filmmaker was pronounced dead at the scene, although no further details were given. The filmmaker had been retired for the past few years, with his last film being the 2012 biopic Chasing Mavericks, and other reports claim he had been suffering from Alzheimer's disease.

Curtis Hanson was born March 24, 1945 in Reno, Nevada and he was raised in Los Angles. Despite his father
See full article at MovieWeb »

Curtis Hanson, Director of ‘8 Mile’ and ‘L.A. Confidential,’ Dies at 71

  • Indiewire
Curtis Hanson, Director of ‘8 Mile’ and ‘L.A. Confidential,’ Dies at 71
Director Curtis Hanson, the man behind the modern neo-noir “L.A. Confidential” and the hip-hop drama “8 Mile,” died yesterday afternoon at the age of 71. According to Variety, he reportedly died of “natural causes” in his Hollywood Hills home.

Read More: Michael Apted Will Replace Ailing Curtis Hanson For Last Few Weeks Of Surfing Drama ‘Of Men And Mavericks’

Hanson got his start working for the legendary Roger Corman, first writing the H.P. Lovecraft adaptation “The Dunwich Horror” and then writing and directing his first feature “Sweet Kill,” about a man who kills women while sleeping with them for sexual gratification.

The director worked steadily through the 70s and 80s, collaborating with actors like Tom Cruise on the 1983 teen comedy “Losin’ It” and with Rob Lowe and James Spader in “Bad Influence.” But his first major success came in 1992 with the psychological thriller “The Hand That Rocks the Cradle,” about a
See full article at Indiewire »

Curtis Hanson dies at 71 by Jennie Kermode - 2016-09-21 11:52:08

Curtis Hanson Photo: David Shankbone

Stars including Russell Crowe, James Woods and Tobey Maguire have today paid tribute to Curtis Hanson, who has died of natural causes at his Hollywood home. Aged 71, Hanson, whose films included L.A. Confidential and Wonder Boys, is believed to have suffered from Alzheimer's disease for some years.

Crowe thanked the director for making his acting into a real carer, while others praised him in a similar way, with Eminem saying that Hanson had made him into an actor for 8 Mile. Rob Lowe, who starred in Bad Influence, described him as smart, kind and a great storyteller.

Hanson, who started out as a screenwriter with an adaptation of Hp Lovecraft's The Dunwich Horror, was known for his eclectic interests. His other successes included The River Wild and The Hand That Rocks The Cradle. He last worked in 2012, co-directing Chasing Mavericks with Michael Apted....
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

R.I.P. Curtis Hanson: L.A. Confidential director dies at 71

Curtis Hanson, the Academy Award-winning co-writer and director of L.A. Confidential and helmer of films like 8 Mile, Wonder Boys, The River Wild and In Her Shoes, has died at his home in Los Angeles at the age of 71. The cause of death is said to be natural causes, but Deadline says that the legendary filmmaker had been in poor health for a while.

Hanson made his directorial debut in 1972 with the horror movie Sweet Kill, but went on to have a four decade career with features like The Hand That Rocks The Cradle and Wonder Boys, as well as the four aforementioned movies. His crowning glory was the 1997 adaptation of the James Ellroy novel L.A. Confidential, the Russell Crowe led ensembles which picked up two Oscars, one for its supporting actress Kim Basinger, and another for Hanson and co-writer Brian Helgeland for their adapted screenplay. The film also
See full article at The Hollywood News »

R.I.P. Curtis Hanson (1945 – 2016)

Osac-winning filmmaker Curtis Hanson has passed away aged 71, with the Los Angeles Police Department announcing that the L.A. Confidential director was found dead in his home on Tuesday. He had been battling Alzheimer’s, and died of natural causes.

Hanson began his career in 1970, co-writing an adaptation of H.P. Lovecraft’s The Dunwich Horror, and went on to writer, direct and produce a number of films before enjoying box office success in the 90s with The Hand that Rocks the Cradle and The River Wild.

In 1997, he earned critical acclaim for L.A. Confidential, which he directed, produced and co-wrote with Brian Helgeland, winning the Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay. Hanson’s later projects included likes of Wonder Boys, 8 Mile and Lucky You, as well as his final film Chasing Mavericks, which he co-directed with Michael Apted in 2012.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Curtis Hanson: 1945-2016

Simon Brew Sep 21, 2016

8 Mile, L.A. Confidential and Bad Influence director Curtis Hanson has died, at the age of 71.

Some sad news. The Academy Award-winning screenwriter and director Curtis Hanson has died at the age of 71.

Hanson’s career in film stretched back to the start of the 1970s, when he adapted H P Lovecraft’s The Dunwich Horror into a screenplay. Yet it was in the 1990s where he really found his groove. Between 1990 and 2002, he helmed Bad Influence, The Hand That Rocks The Cradle, The River Wild, L A Confidential, 8 Mile and Wonder Boys. Each of them was either a critical or commercial success, a few of them both, and he would take home Oscar gold for his L A Confidential screenplay.

His final film was 2012’s Chasing Mavericks, that Michael Apted completed while Hanson recovered from complications arising from his heart surgery.

Hanson died of natural causes at his home in Hollywood.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Hollywood Remembers ‘L.A. Confidential’ Director Curtis Hanson; “So Smart, So Kind” Says Rob Lowe

Hollywood Remembers ‘L.A. Confidential’ Director Curtis Hanson; “So Smart, So Kind” Says Rob Lowe
Refresh for latest… Hollywood was quick to respond to the passing of director Curtis Hanson, director of L.A. Confidential, Wonder Boys, The River Wild and many others. (Read Deadline’s story here). Eminem, star of Hanson’s 8 Mile, said in a statement: “Curtis Hanson believed in me and our crazy idea to make a rap battle movie set in Detroit. He basically made me into an actor for 8 Mile. I’m lucky I got to know him.” Russell Crowe even tweeted twice – to humorously…
See full article at Deadline »

Curtis Hanson, Director of ‘L.A. Confidential,’ Dies at 71

Curtis Hanson, Director of ‘L.A. Confidential,’ Dies at 71
Curtis Hanson, director of “L.A Confidential” and winner with Brian Helgeland of an Oscar for adapting James Ellroy’s novel, was found dead in his Hollywood Hills home on Tuesday afternoon, a spokesperson with the Los Angeles Police Department confirmed. He was 71.

The official said paramedics responded to a call of an unconscious man at Hanson’s home at about 4:52 p.m. on Tuesday. He was pronounced dead at the scene. According to TMZ, which first reported the news, it appears as though Hanson died of a heart attack; while the Lapd spokesperson could not confirm that specific information, he said Hanson died of “natural causes.”

He had been retired in recent years and was reported to be suffering from Alzheimer’s.

As a producer of the stylish 1997 period film, Hanson shared the nomination for best picture and was nominated for best director. The film won an Oscar for actress Kim Basinger,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Curtis Hanson Dies: Oscar-Winning ‘L.A. Confidential’ Filmmaker Was 71

Curtis Hanson Dies: Oscar-Winning ‘L.A. Confidential’ Filmmaker Was 71
Curtis Hanson, who shared an Adapted Screenplay Oscar for L.A. Confidential and also helmed such films as Eminem starrer 8 Mile, Wonder Boys, The River Wild, In Her Shoes and HBO’s Too Big to Fail, died today of natural causes at his Hollywood Hills home. He was 71. Officer Tony Im of the LAPD confirmed the news to Deadline, saying police arrived at Hanson’s home at 4:50 Pm and that he was pronounced dead at the scene. The filmmaker had been in poor health for a…
See full article at Deadline »
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