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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 136 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Quentin Tarantino’s 7 Best Scenes As a Director

10 hours ago | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Quentin Tarantino’s films are famous for their non-linear narratives, for how they jump around in time like a skipping DVD, sometimes even willing their ways into alternate histories. And yet, despite all of their twisty plotting, his movies are increasingly defined by — and remembered for — self-contained scenes that stretch to the breaking point and seem to become iconic even as you’re first watching them. From the ingeniously knotted “Pulp Fiction” to the bifurcated “Death Proof”; from the sprawling “Kill Bill” (which is divided into 10 discrete chapters), to the snowbound “The Hateful Eight” (which limits itself to two locations and finds Tarantino challenging himself to hold a single note of suspense for hours at a time), these epic stories are shaped around chatty, taut, and indelible sequences that simmer with the potential for sudden acts of violence.

In honor of the filmmaker’s 54th birthday (and with a humble »

- David Ehrlich

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7 Good Guy Movie Characters Who Could Have Easily Been Bad Guys

24 March 2017 8:28 AM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Ever watch someone in a movie do something that made you think, “did he really just do that?”  Well, it happens a lot, but because said someone is usually the film’s main character and we want them to win, we let stuff like catastrophic destruction or murder – you know, the little things – slide.

With that said, that doesn’t make what they do right, and the following is a list of 8 movie characters whose choices could be interpreted as either a positive or a negative act. Keep in mind, what we’re looking for here are not necessarily all antiheroes, and that in a lot of these cases, we’re not suggesting that we’re ignorant of the emotional circumstances that prompted the protagonist’s actions. We’re simply playing the devil’s advocate.

The kind of characters that will be featured on this list are protagonists that, for the most part, »

- Luke Parker

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Carrie Fisher’s Death Will Have No Change On ‘Star Wars: The Last Jedi’

24 March 2017 8:10 AM, PDT | ET Canada | See recent ET Canada news »

Our beloved Princess Leia will live on. When Carrie Fisher passed suddenly in December of last year, “Star Wars” fans wondered whether or not it will have an impact on the upcoming film. Related: Samuel L. Jackson Acts Out His Film Career With James Corden In 10 Minutes: From ‘Pulp Fiction’ To ‘Star Wars’ “Star Wars: […] »

- Jordan Appugliesi

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‘Film to Table’: See ‘Tampopo’s’ Ramen Get Cooked Up by Chef Jason Roberts

23 March 2017 11:25 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

There’s nothing better than watching a good movie, except maybe a good movie that features some good-looking food. But fans have only been able to imagine how these dishes would taste — until now, as Lexus is launching a new show on its digital content channel L/Studio called “Film to Table.” Each episode features chef and TV personality Jason Roberts sets out to recreate some of the most famous dishes in film history.

Read More: 25 Mouth-Watering Movies About Food, Restaurants & Chefs

The seven-episode series will recreate meals from such films like “Goodfellas,” “Eat Pray Love,” and “Pulp Fiction,” with the first episode focusing on a ramen dish from the Japanese film “Tampopo.” Fandor’s Haroon Adalat provides cinematic insight as he assists Roberts in cooking up the meal, covering topics such as the film’s Western influences.

The short six minute episode is quite entertaining, while also providing insight »

- Michael Gonzalez

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'A Bad Idea Gone Wrong': Film Review | Swsw 2017

22 March 2017 1:59 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Writer/director Jason Headley’s debut feature represents the sort of unassuming, low-key comedy whose minor pleasures become magnified when showcased amid film festival dross. But it nonetheless signifies a talent to watch. A Bad Idea Gone Wrong should find appreciative audiences in home viewing formats thanks to its quirky humor, enhanced by terrific performances from its cast, who won a special jury prize for best ensemble cast at SXSW.

Beginning with a conversation in a diner that doesn’t shy away from directly referencing a similar scene in Pulp Fiction, the story concerns longtime friends Marlon (Matt Jones) and Leo (Will Rogers) »

- Frank Scheck

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Interviews: Women in Film Chicago 2017 Focus Award Recipients

21 March 2017 10:08 AM, PDT | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – Women in Film Chicago (Wifc) continues its role as one of the best resource and advocacy groups for women filmmakers. Last month, they celebrated their Focus Awards and honored four women – producer Julie Smolyansky, cinematographer Tari Segal, filmmaker Mary Morten and comedian Julia Sweeney.

Focus Awards Honorees, LtoR: Mary Morten, Julie Smolyansky, Tari Segal and Julia Sweeney

Photo credit: Patrick McDonald for HollywoodChicago

Before the event, HollywoodChicago.com interviewed Julie Smoyanksy (click here), the CEO of Lifeway Foods and producer of the documentary “The Hunting Ground.” At the event itself, the other three honorees were interviewed on the Red Carpet.

Julia Sweeney, Comedian and Cast Member of “Saturday Night Live

Julia Sweeney was a force of comedy during her years on “Saturday Night Live” from 1990 to 1994, where she created memorable characters, including the androgynous “Pat” (no one could tell if she was a man or woman). She moved on into one-woman shows, »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Being There,’ ‘Fire at Sea,’ ‘Multiple Maniacs,’ and More

21 March 2017 9:23 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Being There (Hal Ashby)

On paper, there’s an implausibility to the central conceit of Being There that could have resulted in a four-quadrant studio comedy forgotten soon after its release. However, with Hal Ashby’s delicate touch — bringing Jerzy Kosiński and Robert C. Jones‘ adaptation to life — and Peter Sellers‘ innocent deadpan delivery, this 1979 film is a carefully observed look at how those we interact with can offer an introspective mirror into our own lives. “There’s so much left to do, »

- The Film Stage

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James Corden Debuts ‘Donald: The Musical’ With ‘Matilda’ Composer On ‘The Late Late Show’ — Watch

21 March 2017 7:38 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Everyone knows James Corden loves a good Broadway musical, and we love him for it.

The “Late Late Show” host hosted some theater friends on his show last night to debut “Donald: The Musical,” a riff on a song from the Broadway production of “Matilda: The Musical,” which is based on the book by Roald Dahl with music by Australian musical comedian Tim Minchin.

Read More: Stephen Colbert Brings Back His Conservative Alter Ego To Deliver ‘The Werd’ On Trump’s Budget Cuts — Watch

Sporting an orange combover wig, Minchin played the Donald as a young boy dreaming about banning Muslims and “play[ing] with Putin’s balls.” Broadway’s Ben Platt (“Dear Evan Hansen”) played press secretary Sean Spicer, and Abigail Spencer (“Rectify”) donned a raggedy blonde wig as Kellyanne Conway. Taking one for the team, Corden played an adorable version of Steve Bannon (a truly alternate reality) in schoolboy shorts and knee socks. »

- Jude Dry

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James Corden Debuts ‘Donald: The Musical’ With ‘Matilda’ Composer On ‘The Late Late Show’ — Watch

21 March 2017 7:38 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Everyone knows James Corden loves a good Broadway musical, and we love him for it.

The “Late Late Show” host hosted some theater friends on his show last night to debut “Donald: The Musical,” a riff on a song from the Broadway production of “Matilda: The Musical,” which is based on the book by Roald Dahl with music by Australian musical comedian Tim Minchin.

Read More: Stephen Colbert Brings Back His Conservative Alter Ego To Deliver ‘The Werd’ On Trump’s Budget Cuts — Watch

Sporting an orange combover wig, Minchin played the Donald as a young boy dreaming about banning Muslims and “play[ing] with Putin’s balls.” Broadway’s Ben Platt (“Dear Evan Hansen”) played press secretary Sean Spicer, and Abigail Spencer (“Rectify”) donned a raggedy blonde wig as Kellyanne Conway. Taking one for the team, Corden played an adorable version of Steve Bannon (a truly alternate reality) in schoolboy shorts and knee socks. »

- Jude Dry

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James Corden, Abigail Spencer and Co. Star in 'Donald: The Musical' — Watch

21 March 2017 5:37 AM, PDT | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

At the risk of stealing Hamilton‘s thunder, James Corden unveiled his own musical about a certain polarizing politician on Monday’s Late Late Show.

VideosBeauty and the Beast Cast, Corden Recreate Disney Musical in L.A. Traffic

Alongside Timeless star Abigail Spencer, Ben Platt of Broadway’s Dear Evan Hansen and comedian Tim Minchin, Corden presented Donald: The Musical, a four-minute parody of Potus and his White House staff. (Fun fact: The song being spoofed is “When I Grow Up” from the musical Matilda, for which Minchin wrote the music and lyrics.)

In the video above, Minchin plays a kid version of Trump, »

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Viacom's Paramount Channel to Launch in Middle East

20 March 2017 10:00 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - TV News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - TV News news »

Viacom's Paramount Channel is coming to the Middle East and North Africa in April.

The company's Viacom International Media Networks unit will launch what it says is its fastest-growing brand on April 15 in partnership with pay TV giant Osn. The channel will be available in English and with Arabic subtitles.

Among the Paramount Channel content lined up for right after the launch are the likes of Ghost, Forrest GumpPulp Fiction and Mean Girls in an "I Love That Movie" primetime slot, as well as Whitney Houston TV biopic Whitney and BBC miniseries Our Zoo.

The new channel's first "Thursday Focus" feature will be »

- Georg Szalai

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Antoni Llorens, Spain's Leading Distributor in the '90s, Dies at 76

19 March 2017 3:51 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Antoni Llorens, producer of Pedro Almodovar’s landmark 1988 film Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown and a longtime independent distributor in Spain, died over the weekend in Barcelona. He was 76. The cause of death was not revealed.

The charismatic founder and CEO of Lauren Films, Llorens, with a knack for anticipating trends, was arguably the Spanish film industry’s most international player in the 1980s and '90s. Llorens produced 15 films, including the Oscar-nominated Women, which put Almodovar on the international radar, and distributed up to 104 titles a year, including Pulp Fiction, Cinema Paradiso, Terminator and all »

- Pamela Rolfe

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T2 Trainspotting

19 March 2017 11:37 AM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

In 1997 there came a little movie called Trainspotting, adapted by director Danny Boyle and scenarist John Hodge from Scottish writer Irvine Welsh’s novel of the same name. It was the loose-limbed story of a group of childhood friends spinning their collective wheels in the working-class gloom of Edinburgh, Scotland, scheming schemes, committing petty crimes, arguing the merits of Sean Connery (and, by extension, Scotland) and trying to sustain those decaying friendships all while rotating in and out of a seemingly hopeless cycle of heroin addiction, indulgence and withdrawal. For me, Trainspotting’s exuberant, hyperkinetic style decorated a somewhat sensationalistic attitude toward tragedy, on a sociopolitical as well as personal scale, and its scabrous energy always seemed too much at odds with the overwhelming lethargy which follows the orgasmic relief of a desperately needed hit. (I guess I’m more of a Panic in Needle Park kind of guy.)

But what do I know? »

- Dennis Cozzalio

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Chuck Berry Dead at 90: Watch Scenes With His Music in ‘Pulp Fiction’ and ‘Back to the Future’

19 March 2017 7:31 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Chuck Berry passed away on March 18 in Missouri, Variety reports. The 90-year-old guitarist was a cornerstone of rock and roll music, with energetic hits from the ’50s such as “Maybellene” and “Roll Over Beethoven.” He is also credited with perfecting onstage swagger, posing with his guitar and rocking out in a way that heavily influenced countless bands, from The Rolling Stones to Bruce Springsteen and beyond. Outside of effectively creating rock music, Berry also had a defining impact on the film industry, soundtracking two of cinema’s most iconic scenes and influencing scores of filmmakers and actors.

Read More: Bill Paxton Dead at 61: Emmy-Winning ‘Big Love’ and ‘Titanic’ Actor Passes Away From Surgical Complications

Quentin Tarantino famously used “You Can Never Tell” during the Vincent and Mia dance scene in “Pulp Fiction:”

But even that cultural touchstone is eclipsed by Marty McFly’s cover of “Johnny B. Goode »

- William Earl

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Chuck Berry Dead at 90 — Watch TV's Top 'You Never Can Tell' Moments

18 March 2017 4:15 PM, PDT | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

Legendary guitarist and singer-songwriter Chuck Berry, who is considered one of the pioneers of  rock and roll music, has died. He was 90.

According to the St. Charles County Police Department, Berry was found unresponsive in his Missouri home on Saturday. Attempts to revive him proved unsuccessful, and he was pronounced dead at approximately 1:30 pm. A cause of death has not been reported.

Berry had a number of unforgettable hits in the 1950s — including “Maybellene,” “Roll Over Beethoven,” “Rock and Roll Music” and “Johnny B. Goode” — but it’s “You Never Can Tell” with which TV viewers are probably most familiar. »

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Interview: Samurai Jack Actor Phil Lamarr Gets Back to the Past

17 March 2017 11:00 AM, PDT | Screen Anarchy | See recent Screen Anarchy news »

Long ago in a distant land, Cartoon Network abruptly, mysteriously, cancelled one of their most critically-acclaimed series about a foolish Samurai warrior wielding a magic sword, who stepped forth to oppose Aku, the shape-shifting Master of Darkness.  After a full decade of fans refusing to forget the groundbreaking, Emmy award-winning show, Samurai Jack returns to television to finally put an end to Aku’s unspeakable evil and Get Back to the Past.    Samurai Jack himself, actor Phil Lamarr, from Pulp Fiction and MADtv, and voices of Futurama's Hermes and Static Shock, told me what it was like to return to a very different Samurai after a decade.    The Lady Miz Diva:  What is it like to return to this character after a decade?  ...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...] »

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Samuel L. Jackson Would Rather Do John Wick 3 Than a Nick Fury Movie

16 March 2017 11:30 AM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Though Agents of S.H.E.I.L.D. has had a good run on ABC, there has always been talk of Samuel L. Jackson getting his own stand-alone Nick Fury movie. But guess what? The actor doesn't seem so interested in that. And he has a better idea. He wants to co-star in John Wick 3.

Samuel L. Jackson hasn't ever really held the same kind of 'franchise viagra' mantra that fueled Dwayne 'The Rock' Johnson's path to superstardom, but he has appeared in his fare share of sequels, outside of the Marvel universe. After becoming a true household name with his appearance in Pulp Fiction, Jackson immediately took on a key role in Die Hard 3. He also brought quite a bit of gravitas to the Star Wars prequels as Mace Windu. And he's a permanent fixture in the xXx movies. Now, he wants in on John Wick's territory. »

- MovieWeb

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Beauty and the Beast Cast, Corden Recreate Disney Musical in L.A. Traffic

16 March 2017 5:51 AM, PDT | TVLine.com | See recent TVLine.com news »

James Corden was the Belle of the ball crosswalk on Wednesday, recreating Beauty and the Beast outside his Late Late Show studio with the help of stars Dan Stevens, Josh Gad and Luke Evans.

VideosThe Late Show With Stephen Colbert Mocks Rachel Maddow’s Trump-Tax Reveal

With Emma Watson M.I.A., it was up to Corden’s Belle to romance Stevens’ Beast, slow-dancing on a busy Los Angeles street as the crosswalk theater production held up traffic and befuddled observers sitting in their cars.

“That was incredible. It was the most invigorating thing I’ve ever done,” Stevens said after the final number. »

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Why Quentin Tarantino’s ‘Inglourious Basterds’ Screenplay Is a Masterclass in Suspense — Watch

15 March 2017 10:57 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

In his latest Lessons from the Screenplay video, the YouTube user who identifies himself only as Michael takes a look at Quentin Tarantino’s “Inglourious Basterds.” He focuses his attention to the instant-classic opening sequence, which introduced the world at large to not only the character of Hans Landa but to the man playing him, Christoph Waltz.

“What makes this scene so effective?” asks Michael. “How does Quentin Tarantino turn 17 pages of people chatting into one of the most tension-filled scenes of recent memory?”

Read More: ‘Reservoir Dogs’ Video Game Will Let You Cause Bloody Mayhem As Mr. White and Quentin Tarantino’s Entire Gang — Watch

Michael alludes to Moritz Lehne and Stefan Koelsch’s essay “Toward a general psychological model of tension and suspense,” focusing on four of the six components they bring up: conflict, dissonance and instability; uncertainty; emotional significance of anticipated events; and lack of control.

Read »

- Michael Nordine

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Rushes. Orson Welles on Netflix, Malick Speaks, Michael Mann on "Heat" & "Collateral," Classic Takedowns

14 March 2017 1:51 PM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveriesNEWSJohn Huston, Orson Welles and Peter Bogdanovich on the set of The Other Side of the WindWe're still holding our breath, but it looks like we may all get to see Orson Welles' beleaguered film project The Other Side of the Wind, to be released in some fashion by Netflix.The Tribeca Film Festival, running April 17 - 30, has announced its full lineup. Robert Osborne, Turner Classic Movies host and defacto representative in the United States for the appreciation of older films, has died at the age of 84. With his passing, the number of venerable, welcoming advocates for classic cinema is dropping precariously low.Recommended VIEWINGThe proof is the pudding: Director Terrence Malick actually participated in a public, recorded conversation! He was at SXSW to promote his new film, Austin-set Song to Song, and took place in a discussion with Richard Linklater »

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

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