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31 underrated movies well worth a look

Simon Brew Aug 18, 2017

Looking for a film to watch, that you might not have considered before? Try some of these...

Sometimes, we figure, you come to a site like this just to find out about a film you didn’t know about. That you want recommendations of movies that you might not otherwise have uncovered. This list, then, has no theme, save that the films on it are really good, and didn’t get much of an audience first time around. That, or they seem to have been forgotten. It’s a real mix, but hopefully, there’s something on here that appeals..

The Brady Bunch Movie

The Brady Bunch films never really seemed to do much business in the UK, and that’s a real pity. No foreknowledge of the series is required, and the first movie takes the Brady film and transplants them into 1990s America, with no
See full article at Den of Geek »

Examining Hollywood Remakes: The Blob

  • Cinelinx
Our series on big-screen remakes continues with a cult horror film that kickstarted the illustrious career of Steve McQueen. This week, Cinelinx looks at The Blob (1958 vs. 1988). Come inside to see how these two films stack up.

The original version of The Blob was a low-budget monster film made for $110,000. The titular creature was originally supposed to be called The Molten Meteor Monster, which then was changed to The Mass, which turned into The Glob, and Finally The Blob. The film's tongue-in-cheek title song was written by Burt Bacharach and Mack David, which became a hit. The movie was directed by Irvin Yeaworth who specialized in directing motivational educational and religious films, so this was a departure for him. The film was a moderate success, grossing over $4 million, although the critics weren’t overly kind. It has a 67% rating on Rotten Tomatoes. Despite its cheesiness, its reputation has grown over
See full article at Cinelinx »

5 excellent horror films you may not have known were directed by women

  • Hitfix
5 excellent horror films you may not have known were directed by women
Horror isn't known for being a woman-friendly genre. From the flailing histrionics of Fay Wray in "King Kong" to the slasher sub-genre and its attendant bevy of brainless, scantily-clad female victims, there's a perception -- in some ways warranted -- that the horror film caters in misogyny. And yet that's also a frustratingly reductive viewpoint. It seems obvious but I'll say it anyway: boiling down the horror genre to "Friday the 13th Part VII" is like boiling down the comedy genre to Adam Sandler's "Grown-Ups." There is so much more to horror than "a girl running up the stairs when she should be going out the front door." So what of the women working behind the scenes? The number of high-profile woman directors who have worked in the genre remains frustratingly limited, yet there are a few who have not only managed to infiltrate the boys' club but created
See full article at Hitfix »

"Are you a Catholic?" (Actually No, But I *Get* It)

For The Lusty Month of May, we're looking at a few sex scenes. Here's Nathaniel...

They like to say that people come into your lives for a reason. Also true of movies. When I saw Priest (1994) in its American release in 1995, I was just out of the closet but still very much struggling with having been a strict Mormon for then roughly 100% of my life. The movie is about a gay Priest (Linus Roache) who struggles with his vows .... and not just the sexual ones. It hit me in a seismic way. This had never happened to me before or since but I started crying at the end and actually couldn't stop until after the credits had ended. 

Where you are in life can dictate a lot about how you receive a movie. But this series is about sex scenes so let's narrow our focus. Today Priest's sex scene,
See full article at FilmExperience »

June 3rd Blu-ray & DVD Releases Include Ravenous, Video Nasties, Death Bed

Summer is officially right around the corner, which means horror DVD and Blu-rays are starting to heat up as well. This week, we’ve got several cult classics hitting high definition for the first time, another special edition set of the first three seasons of The Walking Dead,and the recent RoboCop reboot directed by Jose Padilha and starring Joel Kinnaman.

As if that wasn’t enough, there’s also a special Doctor Who David Tennant-themed collection being released, several indie creature features and we’re finally seeing the official arrival of the Video Nasties documentaries stateside on Tuesday. Check out all the horror and sci-fi fun you can add to your home collections this week below!

Spotlight Titles:

Death Bed: The Bed That Eats (Cult Epics, Blu-ray)

Prepare yourselves… The strangest bedtime story ever told! Cult Epics brings you Death Bed, George Barry’s uniquely weird journey through a world of wind demons,
See full article at DailyDead »

Blu-ray Release: Ravenous

Blu-ray Release Date: June 3, 2014

Price: Blu-ray $24.97

Studio: Shout! Factory

It’s a cannabilistic fest in 1999 horror movie Ravenous.

Guy Pearce (Lockout) stars in the independent film as Capt. Boyd, a disgraced war veteran who’s quietly sent to a remote fort inhabited by soldiers half-mad with boredom. Then a frozen stranger (Robert Carlyle, California Solo) arrives and tells them about a group of settlers who are trapped in a cave and forced to eat one another. When Boyd and soldiers go to help, they fall into a deadly ambush.

David Arquette (Black Limousine) and Jeffrey Jones (TV’s Deadwood) also star in the thriller, which was directed by Antonia Bird (Priest) and written by Ted Griffin (Tower Heist).

Critics panned Ravenous, which grossed $2 million when it was in theaters. But moviegoers like it much better. The film scored 40% with critics and 79% with moviegoers, according to Rotten Tomatoes.

This Blu-ray release
See full article at Disc Dish »

Gorge Down on Cult Smash Ravenous Coming to Bluray

Inspired by twisted tales of cannibalistic survival like the real-life Donner Party, cult terror feature Ravenous graphically depicts a twist on an old cliché: You are who you eat. Directed by the late Antonia Bird (Priest), this unnerving cult thriller stars Guy Pearce (Iron Man 3, Prometheus), Robert Carlyle (TV’s Once Upon A Time), Jeremy Davies (Lost, Saving Private Ryan), Jeffrey Jones (Deadwood, Sleepy Hollow), John Spencer (The West Wing), Stephen Spinella (Milk, Royal … Continue reading →

Horrornews.net
See full article at Horror News »

Beauty Vs Beast - Choose Life Choices

Ja from Mnpp here with a new round of "Beauty Vs. Beast" for us to play... this week's inspiration? It's the 54th birthday of one of my favorite actors, Scotsman slash raving lunatic Robert Carlyle. Alright yes he's (probably) just acting the "raving lunatic" part... over and over again... so well... by all accounts he's a very nice gentleman. Think how sweet he seemed romancing Linus Roache in Priest! That was the first place I ever saw him - it was two years later where he'd cement the scary status he'd carry on to roles in Ravenous and 28 Weeks Later (which I actually prefer to the original) with the one and only terror that was Begbie in Danny Boyle's 1996 phenom Trainspotting.

Did I say "one and only"? Make that twice and doubly - now that Ewan and Danny have finally made up following DiCaprio-Gate (Boyle cast Leo over Ewan in The Beach,
See full article at FilmExperience »

James Ellis obituary

Actor who played Bert Lynch in BBC police drama Z-Cars and appeared in shows ranging from Doctor Who to Nightingales

The actor James Ellis (also known as Jimmy), who has died aged 82, was the longest-serving original cast member of the hugely popular BBC television series Z-Cars. When Z-Cars began in 1962, it represented a major change in the way the police were characterised in fiction. The BBC police series Dixon of Dock Green had been running for seven years, with Jack Warner playing the understanding, avuncular police constable Dixon. Z-Cars, by contrast, had the actors Stratford Johns and Frank Windsor making cynical remarks about the death of a murdered police colleague whose funeral they were attending, and Ellis, as Constable Bert Lynch, hearing from a colleague how he beats up his wife, without doing anything about it. Z-Cars attempted to show how moral anarchy in the rundown industrial area of the
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

James Ellis obituary

Actor who played Bert Lynch in BBC police drama Z-Cars and appeared in shows ranging from Doctor Who to Nightingales

The actor James Ellis (also known as Jimmy), who has died aged 82, was the longest-serving original cast member of the hugely popular BBC television series Z-Cars. When Z-Cars began in 1962, it represented a major change in the way the police were characterised in fiction. The BBC police series Dixon of Dock Green had been running for seven years, with Jack Warner playing the understanding, avuncular police constable Dixon. Z-Cars, by contrast, had the actors Stratford Johns and Frank Windsor making cynical remarks about the death of a murdered police colleague whose funeral they were attending, and Ellis, as Constable Bert Lynch, hearing from a colleague how he beats up his wife, without doing anything about it. Z-Cars attempted to show how moral anarchy in the rundown industrial area of the
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

DVD Review: 'In the Name Of'

  • CineVue
★★★☆☆In 1994, the late Antonia Bird paired up Linus Roach and Robert Carlisle for Priest (1994), the tale of a Catholic priest torn between the church and his homosexuality. Now, another female director, Malgorzata Szumowska tackles the same subject but from a different social perspective. In the Name Of (2013) is a poignant exploration of burgeoning homosexuality within both Polish society and the strict confinements of the Catholic Church. Adam (Andrzej Chyra), a charming but troubled man, arrives to take over a small parish in rural Poland. He soon becomes popular with his congregation and a pillar of the community.
See full article at CineVue »

Remembering Tom Clancy, Hal Needham, Lou Reed and Other Reel-Important People We Lost in October

  • Movies.com
Reel-Important People is a monthly column that highlights those individuals in or related to the movies who have left us in recent weeks. Below you'll find names big and small and from all areas of the industry, though each was significant to the movies in his or her own way. Norma Bengell (1935-2013) - Brazilian actress who starred in Planet of the Vampires (see below), Mafioso and the Oscar-nominated The Given Word (aka Keeper of Promises). She died from lung cancer on October 9. (Uol) Antonia Bird (1927-2013) - British director of Ravenous, Mad Love and the famously controversial Priest. She died of anaplastic thyroid cancer on October 24. (BBC) Daniel H. Blatt (1937-2013) - Producer of Cujo, The...

Read More
See full article at Movies.com »

Antonia Bird obituary

Stage, TV and film director motivated by a desire to tell relevant and provocative stories

As the director Antonia Bird, who has died aged 62 from anaplastic thyroid cancer, moved from the stage into television and film, she retained the ideals that had come out of the political radicalisation of theatre during the 1970s. Though she was at home in other genres, as with the horror-movie satire Ravenous (1999), her main aim was to use whatever medium she was working in, however commercial or mainstream, to tell important stories, highlight issues and champion causes.

In 1985 the producers of the groundbreaking BBC TV soap EastEnders recruited Antonia to direct 17 early episodes, including the renowned two-hander focusing on the disintegrating marriage of Den and Angie Watts (Leslie Grantham and Anita Dobson). She was the initial director on the BBC's drama Casualty (1986-87), responsible for casting and keen to ensure that the writers used this
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Antonia Bird was a film-makers' role model of passion and fury | Zoe Margolis

This inspiring director's death is a profound loss to film-making, and exposes the lack of women in British film and TV

Meeting Antonia Bird in 1999 was a pivotal moment for me, a novice filmmaker. I'd booked a ticket to a preview screening and Q&A of her film Ravenous and lay in wait for her at the cinema, excited that I was going to meet my directing idol.

When she finally turned the corner I was staking out, a large crowd suddenly appeared from nowhere and I thought my hopes were dashed: how would I approach her now? But the throng were autograph hunters of Robert Carlyle: they were only keen on pursuing the actor; I was alone in being solely interested in the director. I told Bird she was an inspiration and asked if she would mentor me. She, very graciously, gave me her business card and told
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Antonia Bird Dies

Antonia Bird Dies
Cancer has claimed yet another talented filmmaker far too early in their life. Word broke in the early hours of Saturday that TV and film director Antonia Bird has died at the age of 54.Kicking off her career at the Royal Court Theatre, Bird worked her way up from assistant level to directing before making the jump to television with BBC stalwarts EastEnders and Casualty. Those regular gigs led to other jobs including Thin Air and The Men’s Room, adapted from Ann Oakley’s novel.Longer form projects included the acclaimed Safe, which tackled homelessness and scored her a Best First Feature Award at the Edinburgh Television Festival and a BAFTA for Best Single drama. She followed that up with 1994’s Priest which, originally designed solely as a TV movie, was handed a theatrical release and warmly received despite its controversial stance on the Catholic Church. Both projects featured actor Robert Carlyle,
See full article at EmpireOnline »

Antonia Bird dies aged 54

  • ScreenDaily
Antonia Bird dies aged 54
British film and television director Antonia Bird has died aged 54.

Bird was best known for directing films including Priest (1994), Face (1997) and Ravenous (1999), all starring actor Robert Carlyle.

The Scottish star of Trainspotting and The Full Monty said on Twitter: “Such a sad day today. Rip Antonia Bird. Farewell my beautiful friend.”

Bird, who had a rare anaplastic thyroid cancer, died peacefully in her sleep according to a statement from her partner.

The statement added that she had an operation to remove a large tumour in April but “despite a determined fight, she had come to terms with the inevitable in the last few weeks and died peacefully in her sleep.”

Bird worked in TV in more recent years on series including Spooks, Cracker and BBC drama The Village.

She began her career at London’s Royal Court as a theatre director before making episodes of BBC soap EastEnders and medical drama Casualty in the mid-1980s.

Bird
See full article at ScreenDaily »

R.I.P. Antonia Bird

English TV and film director Antonia Bird has died after a cancer battle. She was 54. Bird broke through as a director on episodes of EastEnders and worked extensively on the small screen helming television projects including BBC series Casualty, the Bill Nighy-starring miniseries The Men’s Room, and a 2006 special telefilm episode of Cracker. In film she made a detour into teen romance with the 1995 drama Mad Love, starring Drew Barrymore and Chris O’Donnell. Bird frequently directed actor Robert Carlyle who appeared in her feature debut Priest (1994), Face (1997), and Ravenous (1999), the cannibal horror pic that amassed a cult following after initially opening to dismal returns. “Such a sad day today.. Rip Antonia Bird. Farewell my beautiful friend xxx,” Tweeted Carlyle. BBC series The Village which debuted this Spring was Bird’s final project. She directed four Season 1 episodes of the show created by Peter Moffat. “She said to
See full article at Deadline TV »

Antonia Bird, Director of ‘Priest,’ Dead at 54

  • The Wrap
Antonia Bird, Director of ‘Priest,’ Dead at 54
British film and television director Antonia Bird, whose work attracted controversy and acclaim in equal measure, died Thursday. She was 54 and the cause of death was anaplastic thyroid cancer. Bird was perhaps best known for helming the drama “Priest,” which followed a gay cleric as he struggled to deal with the incestuous relationship between members of his flock, was widely condemned by the Catholic church and inspired protests. The film was a difficult sell for Miramax and its then corporate parent the Walt Disney Company, which ultimately withstood threats of boycotts and released the film to mixed reviews in...
See full article at The Wrap »

Film and TV director Antonia Bird dies, aged 54

TV and film director Antonia Bird has died, aged 54.

She was best known for her work with actor Robert Carlyle, which included the the '90s films Priest, Face and Ravenous.

Carlyle took to Twitter to pay his respects, writing: "Such a sad day today... Rip Antonia Bird. Farewell my beautiful friend."

Bird started her career in theatre but soon moved on to television, where she filmed episodes of EastEnders, Casualty, The Bill, Inspector Morse and Peak Practice.

She also made contributions to Spooks, Cracker and the BBC's The Village.

John Simm, who starred in The Village, also paid tribute over Twitter. He said: "Such terribly sad news yesterday re the untimely death of the wonderful Antonia Bird. A brilliant, inspiring, beautiful Soul. Rip Antonia."

Bird won many awards throughout her career, including two BAFTA TV awards for 'Best Single Drama' and the BAFTA children's award in 2009, as well as
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

Film and TV director Antonia Bird dies, aged 54

Film and TV director Antonia Bird dies, aged 54
TV and film director Antonia Bird has died, aged 54.

She was best known for her work with actor Robert Carlyle, which included the the '90s films Priest, Face and Ravenous.

Carlyle took to Twitter to pay his respects, writing: "Such a sad day today... Rip Antonia Bird. Farewell my beautiful friend."

Bird started her career in theatre but soon moved on to television, where she filmed episodes of EastEnders, Casualty, The Bill, Inspector Morse and Peak Practice.

She also made contributions to Spooks, Cracker and the BBC's The Village.

John Simm, who starred in The Village, also paid tribute over Twitter. He said: "Such terribly sad news yesterday re the untimely death of the wonderful Antonia Bird. A brilliant, inspiring, beautiful Soul. Rip Antonia."

Bird won many awards throughout her career, including two BAFTA TV awards for 'Best Single Drama' and the BAFTA children's award in 2009, as well as
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »
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