The Madness of King George (1994) - News Poster

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2018 BAFTA Awards: ‘Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri’ breaks Best British Film curse

2018 BAFTA Awards: ‘Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri’ breaks Best British Film curse
“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” won the very first BAFTA Award of the evening on Feb. 18 when it was named Best British Film. And it ended the night by claiming the Best Picture prize. That marked just the second time since the British academy reintroduced Best British Film in 1992 that the same movie won both awards. The only other double dipper was “The King’s Speech,” which went to win Best Picture at the Oscars in 2011.

It might seem odd that a film like “Three Billboards,” which is set in the American heartland, qualified for consideration as Best British Film. However, it was written and directed by an Englishman, Martin McDonagh, and co-financed by UK broadcaster Channel 4.

See 2018 BAFTA Awards: ‘Three Billboards’ wins 5 including Best Picture, ‘The Shape of Water’ takes 3 [Updating Live]

Over the last quarter century, seven other British films have been named Best Picture at the BAFTAs: “Howards End
See full article at Gold Derby »

2018 Baftas: Will Best British Film curse strike down ‘Darkest Hour’ or ‘Three Billboards’?

2018 Baftas: Will Best British Film curse strike down ‘Darkest Hour’ or ‘Three Billboards’?
“Darkest Hour” and “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” each reaped nine nominations for the 2018 BAFTA Awards. Among these are bids for Best British Film. While that nomination for the former makes sense given the subject matter and pedigree of Joe Wright‘s biopic about prime minister Winston Churchill, the latter doesn’t appear to be British. However, while the film is set in the American heartland, it was written and directed by an Englishman, Martin McDonagh, and that qualified it for consideration in this category.

Both films also number among the five in contention for Best Picture, alongside the American-made “The Shape of Water” and the international co-productions “Call Me By Your Name” and “Dunkirk.” Fans of either of “Darkest Hour” or “Three Billboards” should be rooting for one of their rivals in the Best British Film race — “The Death of Stalin,” “God’s Own Country,” “Lady Macbeth” or “Paddington 2” — to win on Feb.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Helen Mirren to Receive Career Achievement Honor at Aarp The Magazine's Movies For Grownups Awards

Aarp The Magazine announced today that Helen Mirren will receive the 2017 Movies for Grownups Career Achievement Award.

The Aarp Movies for Grownups multimedia franchise was established in 2002 to celebrate and encourage filmmaking with unique appeal to movie lovers with a grownup state of mind—and recognize the inspiring artists who make them.

Mirren, an Academy, Golden Globe, Emmy, Tony, BAFTA & Olivier Award-winning actress will receive Movies for Grownups’ highest honor on Monday, Feb. 5, 2018, at the Beverly Wilshire, Beverly Hills. Aarp The Magazine will host the 17th annual Movies for Grownups Awards, where many other awards, including best actor, best actress and best director, will be presented. Event proceeds benefit Aarp Foundation, which works to end senior poverty by building economic opportunity and social connections for vulnerable older adults in L.A. and across the country.

“I am greatly honoured by this award. I consider film to be a high art form,
See full article at Look to the Stars »

The Madness of King George

It’s great when a fancy costume picture really has something to say — Alan Bennett’s crazy tale of a king’s episode of mental illness becomes a highly entertaining comedy of errors, but with serious personal and political ramifications. Nigel Hawthorne is exceptionally good as the sovereign whose brain has de-railed; Helen Mirren, Ian Holm, Rupert Everett and Amanda Donohoe variously try to help him — or steal his crown.

The Madness of King George

Blu-ray

Olive Films

1994 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 111 min. / Street Date October 31, 2017 / available through the Olive Films website / 29.98

Starring: Nigel Hawthorne, Helen Mirren, Ian Holm, Amanda Donohoe, Rupert Everett, Julian Wadham, Jim Carter, Rupert Graves, Julian Rhind-Tutt, Anthony Calf, John Wood, Robert Swann, Peter Woodthorpe.

Cinematography: Andrew Dunn

Film Editor: Tariq Anwar

Production Design: Ken Adam

Written by Alan Bennett from his play

Produced by Stephen Evans, David Parfitt

Directed by Nicholas Hytner

Every few years the
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Furniture Index

Can we have a random break for applause for Daniel Walber's The Furniture column. It was Daniel's birthday this weekend so he has the day off. He's already 69 episodes in to this incredible series which has been filled with sharp insights, a keen eye, and rich Hollywood anecdotes. Here's everything he's covered thus far. Please show your love in the comments if you look forward to these each Monday.

The Forties and Fifties

Hold Back the Dawn (1941) Bored at the border

How Green Was My Valley (1941) Designing dignity

That Hamilton Woman (1941) High ceilings

• Captain of the Clouds (1942) A Canadian air show

• The Magnificent Andersons (1942) Victorian Palace / Manifest Destiny

My Gal Sal (1942) Nonsense Gay Nineties

The Shanghai Gesture (1942) Appropriating Chinese design

Black Narcissus (1947) Mad for matte paintings

David and Bathsheba (1951) A humble palace of moral struggle

A Streetcar Named Desire (1951) Decorative madness

My Cousin Rachel (1952) Ghosts of property

Lust for Life
See full article at FilmExperience »

The Furniture: The Cluttered, Musty Madness of King George

"The Furniture" is our weekly series on Production Design. You can click on the images to see them in magnified detail.

by Daniel Walber

Play adaptations are frequently criticized for not being “cinematic” enough. It’s as perennial a complaint as it is a silly one. Many of the best play adaptations don’t abandon their more theatrical elements, they use cinema’s unique capabilities as an especially potent additive.

The Madness of King George is a great example, a film that juxtaposes the visual freedom of on-location shooting with the precision of period sets. Adapted by Alan Bennett from his own play and directed by Nicholas Hytner, it chronicles the Regency Crisis of 1788. King George III (Nigel Hawthorne), perhaps as a result of porphyria, lost his grip on reality. The Prince of Wales (Rupert Everett) petitioned Parliament to have his father removed from power, and to have himself declared regent.
See full article at FilmExperience »

Exclusive Portraits: Helen Mirren & Taylor Hackford Honored at Cinema/Chicago Gala

Chicago – There ain’t nothing like Dame Helen Mirren, international star and Oscar winner for “The Queen.” She, along with her husband Taylor Hackford (director of “Ray” and “An Officer and a Gentleman”), were honored at the Cinema/Chicago Spring Gala on May 24, 2017.

Cinema/Chicago, the presenting organization of the Chicago International Film Festival, is a non-profit arts and education organization dedicated to fostering communication between people of diverse cultures through the art of film and the moving image. Their programs include the Chicago International Film Festival, Chicago International Television Festival, the CineYouth Festival, international screenings, and a year-round education program. Celebrating its 53rd edition October 12-26, 2017, the Chicago International Film Festival is North America’s longest running competitive film fest.

Helen Mirren at the Cinema/Chicago Spring Gala, May 24th, 2017

Photo credit: Joe Arce of Starstruck Foto for HollywoodChicago.com

Dame Helen Lydia Mirren was born in London, and
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

The myth of The Madness Of King George

Simon Brew Jun 19, 2017

The Madness Of King George is a film that was sold off the back of a story that wasn’t true…

Nominated for four Oscars, and bringing the late, great Nigel Hawthorne to the attention of movie audiences (following his sensational work in television and on the stage), The Madness Of King George was a real breakout hit. Premiering in December 1994 (just two months after filming wrapped!), and released in the UK in March 1995, the film won one Academy Award, three BAFTAs, and grossed over $15m in the Us alone.

But there’s one story about the movie that continues to circle. And it’s to do with its title.

The film is based on Alan Bennett’s play, The Madness Of King George III, that tells the story of the health issues that King George III suffered during his reign in the 18th century. But when
See full article at Den of Geek »

Oscars In Memoriam: Carrie Fisher, Debbie Reynolds, Gene Wilder, Others Honored

Oscars In Memoriam: Carrie Fisher, Debbie Reynolds, Gene Wilder, Others Honored
Sara Bareilles helped the Academy pay tribute to lives lost this year during the Oscarcast’s In Memoriam segment. The “Waitress” songstress sang Judy Collins’ “Both Sides Now” while the annual video honored Carrie Fisher, Debbie Reynolds, John Hurt, Mary Tyler Moore, Anton Yelchin, Prince, Garry Marshall, Ken Howard, and more.

The cutoff for including deaths in the segment is usually around Jan. 31. Therefore, David Bowie was included in last year’s Oscar ceremony. Bill Paxton, who died Saturday, was remembered by an emotional Jennifer Aniston before she introduced the segment.

The segment saluted the more recognizable names and faces in addition to below-the-line creatives and executives. As in years past, the Academy asked attendees to hold their applause until the end to avoid favoritism and any disrespect toward the lesser-known honorees.

Related

Academy Award Winners 2017: Updated List

“Sara’s unique artistry will honor those we’ve lost in our community,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Films people agreed to make to get their dream projects made

Simon Brew Oct 7, 2016

From Demolition Man and James Bond through to Speed 2 and Steven Seagal: the movies filmmakers took on to get other projects made.

One for the studio, one for yourself? That’s sometimes been the case when it comes to making movies, and we suspect – under the surface – it happens more than we’re ever told. However, every now and then, it becomes clear that someone has signed up for a movie, with getting the film they really, really want to make as the hidden reason. Such as in these cases…

Nigel Hawthorne: Demolition Man

The late, great Nigel Hawthorne wasn't much of a fan of the much-liked Sylvester Stallone-Wesley Snipes showdown, Demolition Man. In his autobiography Straight Face, Hawthorne called the experience of making the film "miserable", and wasn't impressed with the time lost on set waiting around for Stallone and Snipes.

But
See full article at Den of Geek »

Bob & Co partners with 'Shakespeare In Love' producer David Parfitt

Trademark Films’ Parfitt will act as a creative consultant for the UK production and financing outfit.

UK producer David Parfitt (Shakespeare In Love) is set to partner with London-based media company Bob & Co as a creative consultant.

Parfitt will sit on the company’s Jersey-based Investment Committee for the Cultural Capital Fund, helping to guide ongoing media investments, which include film, TV and theatre projects.

He will also consult across Bob & Co’s media partners including newly-launched TV outfit Duchess Street Productions and Lilting production company Sums Film & Media.

Bob & Co has been working with Parfitt on its adaptation of Sebastian Faulks’ The Girl At The Lion d’Or, which is currently in development.

Parfitt will continue to work on his Trademark Films slate, which has in the past produced titles including My Week With Marilyn and BBC-hbo TV mini-series Parade’s End.

Parfitt commented: “I have worked closely with Bob & Co on their brilliant adaptation of Sebastian
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Best Royal Movies

Queen Elizabeth II’s coronation by Cecil Beaton

This week marks the 90th birthday of her majesty Queen Elizabeth II.

Elizabeth Alexandra Mary was born in 1926. The Queen celebrates two birthdays each year: her actual birthday on the 21st of April and her official birthday on the second Saturday in June. (Trooping of the Colours)

She is the world’s oldest reigning monarch as well as Britain’s longest-lived. In 2015, she surpassed the reign of her great-great-grandmother, Queen Victoria, to become the longest-reigning British monarch and the longest-reigning queen regent in world history.

Looking to celebrate her Majesty’s birthday? First, everyone rise for the national anthem of the United Kingdom.

God save our gracious Queen!

Long live our noble Queen!

God save the Queen!

Send her victorious,

Happy and glorious,

Long to reign over us:

God save the Queen!

For more on the Queen’s schedule, visit the official site: www.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Wamg Giveaway – Lady In The Van Blu-ray and Screenplay

“The Virgin Mary. I spoke to her yesterday. She was outside the post office.”

The Lady In The Van, the British comedy-drama based on Alan Bennett’s memoir about an eccentric elderly woman who “temporarily” parks her van in Mr. Bennett’s driveway and proceeds to live there for 15 years, arrives on Blu-ray™, DVD & Digital HD April 19 from Sony Pictures Home Entertainment. This critically acclaimed Sony Pictures Classics film features the magnificent Maggie Smith (TV’s “Downton Abbey”), whose portrayal of Miss Mary Shepherd earned her a Golden Globe® nomination for Best Actress in a Motion Picture. Alex Jennings (Babel) heads the ensemble cast, along with James Corden (TV’s “The Late Late Show with James Corden”), Dominic Cooper (My Week with Marilyn), and Jim Broadbent (Brooklyn). The Lady In The Van was written by Oscar®-nominated playwright Alan Bennett (The Madness of King George) and directed by BAFTA and
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Remembering Garry Shandling, Patty Duke and Other Reel-Important People We Lost in March

  • Movies.com
Reel-Important People is a monthly column that highlights those individuals in or related to the movies that have left us in recent weeks. Below you'll find names big and small and from all areas of the industry, though each was significant to the movies in his or her own way. Sir Ken Adam (1921-2016) - Production Designer. He won Oscars for his work on Barry Lyndon and The Madness of King George and was nominated for Around the World in Eighty DaysThe Spy Who Loved Me and Addams Family Values. He also worked on Dr. Strangelove, Ben-Hur, In & Out, Chitty Chitty Bang BangSleuth and the other James Bond movies GoldfingerThunderballYou Only Live TwiceDr. No, Diamonds Are...

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See full article at Movies.com »

Round-Up: The Wave Blu-ray / DVD, An Ending, Sacrifice, The Divine Tragedies, Night Wolf

Roar Uthaug’s The Wave crashes on the shores of Blu-ray, DVD, and Digital HD on June 21st. Also in this round-up: production details on Jessica Cameron’s An Ending, release details for Sacrifice and The Divine Tragedies, and Kickstarter launch details for Night Wolf.

The Wave: “Nestled in Norway’s Sunnmøre region, Geiranger is one of the most spectacular tourist draws on the planet. With the mountain Åkerneset overlooking the village — and constantly threatening to collapse into the fjord — it is also a place where cataclysm could strike at any moment. After putting in several years at Geiranger’s warning centre, geologist Kristian (Kristoffer Joner) is moving on to a prestigious gig with an oil company. But the very day he’s about to drive his family to their new life in the city, Kristian senses something isn’t right. The substrata are shifting. No one wants to believe
See full article at DailyDead »

9 affable action movie villains

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Some bad guys just want to collect antiques, or sand down a nice coffee table. Presenting our pick of 9 affable action movie villains...

Villains come in all shapes and sizes, from the hulking and formidable, like Bane in The Dark Knight Rises, to the more lithe and cunning, like the maniacal Scorpio in Dirty Harry. The most memorable villains almost always have one thing in common, though: whether they're blessed with brains, brawn or both, they're intimidating and powerful in some way. They're a worthy foil for the hero (or heroine) of the piece.

So what happens when a villain comes across as, well, just plain nice? Sure, they may have the henchmen, the money, the gadgets and the guns. But some villains seem just too easy-going and friendly to be properly intimidating. This isn't to say the performances are bad; in some cases, they're scene-stealingly brilliant.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Sir Ken Adam obituary

Production designer of extravagant sets and gadgetry for the James Bond films

A good film production designer must be an architect, engineer, painter, decorator, draughtsman and visionary. Sir Ken Adam, who has died aged 95, was all of these and more. He had a knowledge of the arts in general, which he was able to use to recreate the scrupulously researched historical period of a movie, exemplified by his two Academy Awards for best art direction, both set in the 18th century: Stanley Kubrick’s Barry Lyndon (1975), inspired by the English landscape and portrait paintings of the period, and Nicholas Hytner’s The Madness of King George (1994).

It was Adam’s designs for seven James Bond movies, however, that made him probably the only production designer whose name and work are widely known. He provided the visual template for the 007 franchise in Dr No (1962), the first in the enduring action-adventure series.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Sir Ken Adam, Oscar-winning Production Designer, Dead At Age 95

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

Cinema Retro mourns the loss of Sir Ken Adam, the ingenious, Oscar-winning production designer who has passed away at age 95. Adam's work helped redefine films in terms of the elaborate and creative designs he invented, particularly for the James Bond franchise. Adam's work on the first 007 film, "Dr. No" in 1962 was deemed to be nothing less than remarkable, considering that the entire film was shot on a relatively low budget of just over $1 million. His exotic designs so impressed Stanley Kubrick that he hired Adam as production designer on his 1964 classic "Dr. Strangelove." For that film, Adam created the now legendary "War Room" set which many people believe actually exists at the Pentagon. In fact when Ronald Reagan was inaugurated as President in 1981 he asked to see the War Room, only to be told that it was a fictional creation. Reagan acknowledged that he had been intrigued
See full article at CinemaRetro »

James Bond, 'Dr. Strangelove' designer Sir Ken Adam dies aged 95

James Bond, 'Dr. Strangelove' designer Sir Ken Adam dies aged 95
Two-time Oscar winner Adam was the first production designer to receive a knighthood.

Sir Ken Adam, the two-time Oscar winning production designer known for his work on James Bond films of the 1960s and 70s, died Thursday [10 March] at his home in London.

In addition to his work on Bond films including Goldfinger, The Spy Who Loved Me and Moonraker, Adam was highly regarded for his iconic production design in Stanley Kubrick’s Dr. Strangelove. Director Steven Spielberg described the film’s ‘War Room’ as the best film set ever built.

He was also known for designing the original car for 1968 musical Chitty Chitty Bang Bang [pictured below].

Adam won his first Oscar in 1976 for his work on Kubrick’s Barry Lyndon, and his second in 1995 for Nicholas Hytner’s The Madness Of King George. He received three additional nominations for Around The World In 80 Days, The Spy Who Loved Me, and Addams Family Values.

Adam was born
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Sir Ken Adam, Oscar-winning production designer, dies aged 95

Creator of sets for Goldfinger and Dr Strangelove won Academy Awards for The Madness of King George and Barry Lyndon

Tributes have been paid to Sir Ken Adam, the Oscar-winning production designer, who has died aged 95. Adam was best known for putting together the sets for a series of Bond films, as well as Dr Strangelove and others.

He won an Academy Award for his work on The Madness of King George and another for Stanley Kubrick’s Barry Lyndon. Adam was also one of the few Germans who flew for the Raf during the second world war.

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See full article at The Guardian - Film News »
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