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Harvey Weinstein Accusations: How Film Festival Environments Provided a Backdrop For Sexual Assault

  • Indiewire
Harvey Weinstein Accusations: How Film Festival Environments Provided a Backdrop For Sexual Assault
In 1995, Harvey Weinstein tried to give Mira Sorvino a massage, chasing her around the room when she rebuffed him. In 1996, he sexually assaulted rising French actress Judith Godrèche in a hotel room; a year later, he had another incident with Rose McGowan. In 2008, actress Louisette Geiss fled a hotel room where Weinstein tried to get her to watch him masturbate. In 2010, he tricked another French actress, Emma de Caunes, into visiting a hotel room where he exposed himself and tried to get her lie down.

In all of these accounts, Weinstein seemed to think that the relative privacy of the hotel room provided him with a sanctuary in which he could perform deplorable acts on whomever he pleased, but the context was more specific than that: In every instance, he was at a film festival.

Read More:Harvey Weinstein Is Done: After 30 Years of Abusive Behavior, the Mogul Lies in
See full article at Indiewire »

What Happened to the Women Directors in Hollywood? Part 4: 1984–1999

Mississippi Masala

by Carrie Rickey

This five-part Truthdig series by Carrie Rickey is published in partnership with Women and Hollywood. The series considers the historic accomplishments of women behind the camera, how they got marginalized, and how they are fighting for equal employment. Specifically, this series asks, why do females make up between 33 and 50 percent of film-school graduates but account for only seven percent of working directors? What happened to the women directors in Hollywood?

While female filmmakers waited for Judge Pamela Rymer to hand down a decision in the 1983 Directors Guild class-action suit against Warner Brothers and Columbia Pictures, alleging discrimination for not hiring women and ethnic minorities represented by the guild, there were positive signs of change in Hollywood.

In 1984, for the first time that almost anyone could remember, one needed two hands to count the number of feature films by women released in the U.S. market. One was Diane Kurys’ “Entre Nous” (1983), nominated for best foreign film at the Academy Awards in April 1984, making Kurys the second female director whose film was so honored.

Between 1950 and 1980, the number of movies directed by women in the Directors Guild of America (DGA) totaled 14. From 1984 to 1985 there were 12.

In 1984 many women were making their second features. Among them were Gillian Armstrong’s period drama “Mrs. Soffel,” Amy Heckerling’s gangster comedy “Johnny Dangerously,” Penelope Spheeris’ teenage-runaway saga “Suburbia,” and Amy Holden Jones’ romantic drama “Love Letters.” Martha Coolidge, beloved for “Valley Girl,” her 1983 debut, was on her third feature, “National Lampoon’s Joy of Sex.” With more women behind the movie camera in the United States than any time since the ’teens, it seemed that Hollywood was reopening the studio gates to women. Their movies featured women in lead roles.

The wave of optimism crested in 1985. Argentine director Maria Luisa Bemberg’s historical romance “Camila” (1984) was in contention for best foreign film. Susan Seidelman, an Nyu film-school grad who made a splash in 1983 with the indie “Smithereens,” released “Desperately Seeking Susan,” starring “It Girl” Rosanna Arquette and Madonna, cast when the latter was a relative unknown. It was a runaway hit. Heckerling and Spheeris each released third features, respectively “National Lampoon’s European Vacation” and “The Boys Next Door.” Coolidge released her fourth: “Real Genius,” a genuinely funny nerd comedy with a fully developed female character — and special effects.

Then came the crash.

In August 1985 Judge Rymer handed down her decision. While the class-action case was important and viable, Rymer ruled, she had to disqualify the DGA from leading the class due to a conflict of interest. White male members also competing for directing jobs dominated the guild, she said. Thus the DGA was in no position to represent the interests of its women and ethnic minority members. Out of exhaustion and lack of money, the Original Six, the group of female filmmakers that had first spurred the DGA to initiate the suit, did not pursue it any further.

As the DGA suit played out during the early 1980s, Hollywood’s business model was in flux. Studios abandoned the one-size-fits-all strategy of advertising a movie in general-interest publications and embraced segmented marketing — that is, making and marketing movies to a specific demographic. Fewer dollars were spent advertising movies in mainstream newspapers and more were spent on ads that ran during TV shows young males were said to watch. More and more, movies starred predominantly men and boys. Because actors had higher-profile roles, they could command higher salaries than actresses.

By dividing the market into sectors, studios divided the audience and the culture. Boys see movies about boys. Older people see movies about older people. Women see movies about women. Those in different demographics no longer watch the same stories.

In 1980, four of the 10 top box office stars were women: Sally Field, Jane Fonda, Sissy Spacek, and Barbra Streisand. In 1990 there was only one: Julia Roberts. According to 1990 statistics from the Screen Actors Guild, not only were actresses underpaid, but they were also “undercast”: 14 percent of the leading roles, and only 29 percent of all roles, went to women.

The “Indiana Jones” trilogy made in the 1980s reflected the progressively diminishing role of females in film during a decade when male action/adventures dominated the multiplex. In “Raiders of the Lost Ark” (1981), the character Marion Ravenwood (Karen Allen) plays Indy’s helpmate. In “Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom” (1984), the Willie Scott character (Kate Capshaw) is helpless. And in “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade,” archeologist Elsa Schneider (Alison Doody) is the enemy.

Despite such trends, the late 1980s and 1990s proved to be boom years for female directors in Hollywood and Indiewood, as independent film is known. In 1987, Kathryn Bigelow, a onetime sculptor and graduate of Columbia University’s film program, made her second feature, the “vampire Western” “Near Dark.” And though Elaine May’s studio film “Ishtar” was almost universally panned upon release, it earned belated respect. Richard Brody of The New Yorker correctly described it as “an unjustly derided masterwork.” In 1987, six percent of films were directed by women, higher than at any time since 1916.

The percentage dropped in 1988, but that was a watershed year for female filmmakers. “Big,” a comedy from Penny Marshall (co-written by Anne Spielberg), was universally acclaimed. It was the first movie directed by a woman that surpassed $100 million at the box office. With the romantic comedy “Crossing Delancey,” Joan Micklin Silver returned to making big-screen fare, and her modest hit was well received. Also in 1988, Silver’s daughter, Marisa, made her second feature, “Permanent Record,” about teen suicide. “Salaam, Bombay!”, the first feature from Mira Nair, the India-born, Harvard-educated documentarian, was a best foreign film Oscar nominee.

The following year, “Look Who’s Talking” from Amy Heckerling likewise surpassed the $100 million mark for box office sales in the U.S. and made nearly $300 million worldwide. For the most part, though, heads of studios regarded Marshall’s and Heckerling’s box-office smashes as flukes. Two heads of production told me in 1991 that “movies by women don’t make money.” Nevertheless, it turned out to be a exceptional year for the quality and range of releases from women. And it shaped up to be a year when movies by female filmmakers did make serious money.

Some of the highlights of 1991: Julie Dash’s “Daughters of the Dust,” an evocative portrait of generations of Gullah women off the South Carolina coast circa 1901; Jodie Foster’s “Little Man Tate,” about a child prodigy emotionally torn between his mother and a psychologist for gifted children; and Mira Nair’s “Mississippi Masala,” a sexy romance about a South Asian woman born in Uganda (played by then-newcomer Sarita Choudhry) in love with an African-American man (Denzel Washington). Both Kathryn Bigelow’s action film “Point Break” and Barbra Streisand’s psychological study “Prince of Tides” examined the emotional costs to men who struggle to prove their masculinity. Bigelow’s movie grossed $83 million and Streisand’s $110 million. (Adjusted for inflation, that’s $148 million and $196 million in today’s dollars.)

Not only can female filmmakers make movies that show a different side of men, but they also make movies that show different aspects of women. Penny Marshall’s “A League of Their Own” (1992), about the All-American Girls Baseball Leagues during World War II, celebrates the athleticism (rather than the sexuality) of the female body. Nora Ephron’s “This is My Life,” her 1992 directorial debut about a single mom whose choice of comedy career affects her daughters, shows that career and motherhood need not be in conflict. Like Ephron’s film, Allison Anders’ “Gas Food Lodging” (also 1992) explores what happens when the children of single moms reconnect with biological fathers. Male directors were, and are not, making movies like these.

During the 1990s, almost every year brought a new evergreen made by a female filmmaker. In 1993 there were two. One was Jane Campion’s “The Piano,” a haunting allegory about a mute woman that struck a chord internationally. It earned $62 million at the box office and multiple Oscar nominations, including one for best director, making Campion the third woman to be cited in this category. The other was Nora Ephron’s “Sleepless in Seattle,” the comedic romance between two people who don’t meet in person until the last scene, which scored a $227 million box office.

“Sleepless” additionally introduced the questionable concept of the “chick flick” to a broader audience. This is a non-genre that has come to be defined as any movie that, according to the term’s proponents, women want to see and that men think they don’t want to watch — or any movie directed by a woman. The division between “chick flick” and its corollary, the “dick flick,” is a perhaps unintended consequence of target marketing, implying that movies represent a gender-linked proposition.

Almost overnight, the perception was created that movies predominantly featuring women, or “women’s interests,” or directed by women would shrivel the manhood of the male moviegoer. In 1994 the head of a major studio told me, without irony or shame, that “Women on the screen means no men in the audience.” When I asked him for data to back up his claim, he said he had it, but it was proprietary.

Despite such signs of cultural and corporate sexism, the 1990s were a good time to be a female filmmaker. In 1994, Gillian Armstrong’s “Little Women” was immediately embraced as a classic. Newcomer Darnell Martin’s “I Like it Like That,” an urban comedy about a working mother juggling job, marriage, and parenthood, earned positive reviews. And Rose Troche’s “Go Fish,” the first indie comedy about girl-on-girl courtship, marked a milestone for the burgeoning genre.

The following year, 16 films by women were in U.S. release, setting another record for that era. Many of them were comedies. There was Amy Heckerling’s “Clueless,” a droll version of Jane Austen’s “Emma” set at a Beverly Hills high school. There is Betty Thomas’ “The Brady Bunch Movie,” in which the former actress sets the characters of the 1970s TV hit in the 1990s to great comic effect. Distinctly not a comedy was Kathryn Bigelow’s “Strange Days,” a science-fiction thriller about sex crimes, which lost money but became a cult favorite. At the 1996 Oscar ceremony, with “Antonia’s Line,” Dutch filmmaker Marleen Gorris became the first female filmmaker to direct the award-winning foreign film.

But apart from Bigelow and Mimi Leder, a director of episodic television who in 1997 directed “The Peacemaker” and in 1998 “Deep Impact,” female filmmakers were not making action films. For the most part women made comedies and human stories, movies with no explosions in the opening scene. Veteran filmmaker Martha Coolidge spoke for many women when she noted that the scripts the studios sent her were for comedies or family dramas. “About 90 percent of what comes my way are ten different kinds of breast cancer stories, ten kinds of divorce stories, and ten kinds of women-taking-care-of-their-fathers stories,” she said. “I do those. I care about those deeply. But one does want to do more.”

Female filmmakers were typecast in the way many actors and actresses have been, for the most part pigeonholed in family drama and comedy genres. For example, in 1997 actress Kasi Lemmons made her directorial debut with “Eve’s Bayou,” a haunting family drama, and Betty Thomas returned with the Howard Stern biopic “Private Parts.” In 1998, Ephron returned with the romantic comedy “You’ve Got Mail.” Nancy Meyers, a long-time screenwriter, made her directorial debut with the family-friendly comedy “The Parent Trap,” and Brenda Chapman, a Disney animator, was one of three directors on “Prince of Egypt,” the animated story of Moses.

In 1999, three female filmmakers made rookie features unlike anything in American movies. Two were romantic dramas about teenage sexuality, the other an imaginative Shakespeare adaptation. Sofia Coppola’s “The Virgin Suicides,” based on the novel by Jeffrey Eugenides, looked at how boys look at girls, subversively turning the female gaze on the male gaze. Kimberly Peirce’s “Boys Don’t Cry” dramatized the life story of Teena Brandon, who changed her name and gender to become Brandon Teena and fell victim to a hate crime.

Julie Taymor, the theater director who created “The Lion King” on stage, made her movie debut with “Titus,” an anachronistic version of the Shakespeare history play “Titus Andronicus,” underscoring its parallels to Italy under Mussolini.

At the end of the decade — and century — of the 11,000 filmmakers working both in television and film included in the Directors Guild of America, about 2,300 were women. While women made up 21 percent of the membership, they comprised only 9 percent of the filmmakers working in movies.

Most, including Martha Lauzen, a professor at San Diego State University and the head of the Center for the Study of Women in Film and Television, naturally assumed that in the new century the needle would move toward 50/50.

In addition to writing film reviews and essays for Truthdig, Carrie Rickey has been a film critic at The Philadelphia Inquirer and Village Voice, and an art critic at Artforum and Art in America. Rickey has taught at various institutions, including School of the Art Institute of Chicago and the University of Pennsylvania, and has appeared frequently on NPR’s “Talk of the Nation,” MSNBC, and CNN.

What Happened to the Women Directors in Hollywood? Part 4: 1984–1999 was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Sundance 2017: 10 Reasons Why This Year’s Festival Is Essential for Queer Cinema

  • Indiewire
Sundance 2017: 10 Reasons Why This Year’s Festival Is Essential for Queer Cinema
Film historian B. Ruby Rich credits the 1992 Sundance Film Festival as the cradle of New Queer Cinema, and a quick survey of this year’s festival lineup confirms that Lgbt films stand an excellent chance of attracting audiences. Lesbian filmmaker Dee Rees’ “Mudbound” is one of the most talked about films of the year, trans director Yance Ford’s deeply personal “Strong Island” has been years in the making, and we may have the British “Brokeback Mountain” (but better) with Francis Lee’s “God’s Own Country.”

Perusing the slate of queer films, filmmakers, and performers at Sundance this year, 2017 is set to be the best year queer cinema has seen in a long time. Here’s 10 reasons why:

Read More: 10 Surprises and Hidden Gems from the 2017 Sundance Lineup

Dee Rees is About to Become the Most Successful Black Lesbian Director in Hollywood

Queer audiences have known Dee Rees since
See full article at Indiewire »

Rose Troche Does Vr: How A Major ’90s Filmmaker Is Making New Technology Indie

  • Indiewire
Rose Troche Does Vr: How A Major ’90s Filmmaker Is Making New Technology Indie
“If I tell you to move a little, it’s not because I don’t think you’re beautiful,” said Rose Troche, speaking to an extra on the set for her latest Vr film, an untitled short based on the Orlando shooting. “I like to have things happening all over.”

Most of the extras were too young to remember “Go Fish,” Troche’s history-making debut feature. (Made for an estimated $15,000, it made over $2.5 million at the box office.) Shot in black and white, “Go Fish” is a lesbian romantic comedy that became the little indie that could when it played Sundance in 1994. “I don’t think ‘Go Fish’ launched a thousand queer filmmakers so much as it launched a thousand indie filmmakers,” Troche said.

Troche went on to direct “Bedrooms and Hallways” in 1998 and “The Safety of Objects” in 2001. Since then she’s moved to TV, directing an episode of
See full article at Indiewire »

Lgbtq Filmmakers Grapple With The Responsibility Of Eulogizing Orlando Nightclub Shooting

  • Indiewire
Buoyed by the Supreme Court decision on same-sex marriage, things looked really good for Lgbtq people at the start of 2016. Then came the Orlando massacre, and with it the reminder that queer people were not safe, not even within the comforts provided by its culture.

That was only six weeks ago, but it seems longer. Orlando has fallen out of the news cycle — for the media, too many fresher tragedies take precedence. There’s the police murders of black men, an assassin’s murders of police and the public in Dallas, the Nice attacks, and even another Florida nightclub shooting, this one in Fort Myers. And for the public, the crises converge. There were signs remembering Orlando at Black Lives Matter rallies, and the Lgbtq community responded to Orlando with anti-gun rallies and messages of support for Muslims.

This puts Lgbtq culture in a familiar position: If the threats to
See full article at Indiewire »

Virtual Reality comes to Melbourne as the 65th Miff gets ready for lift off

  • IF.com.au
Oscar Raby's The Turning Forest, screening at Miff via Oculus alongside Raby's Easter Rising: Voice of a Rebel.

Virtual reality looks set to break into the mainstream in 2016, with Australia's film festivals leading the way. The Melbourne International Film Festival kicks off this Thursday, and one of its most exciting new sidebars is its Vr program.

In this extract from the latest issue of If, we chat to those leading the way in the new medium (including Melbourne-based Oscar Raby, whose work is being showcased at Miff) to get the lowdown on what's happening in Vr - and what's ahead.

Australian filmmaker Matthew Bate first experienced virtual reality at last year.s Sundance, where his feature documentary Sam Klemke.s Time Machine played in the festival.s New Frontier sidebar..

.I'd never experienced it before, and I remember watching a couple of Vr works and standing up and declaring,
See full article at IF.com.au »

15 Great Ways Filmmakers Found Their Independence In The Last 20 Years

  • Indiewire
15 Great Ways Filmmakers Found Their Independence In The Last 20 Years
Subverting the Unexpected

At the end of the 20th century, Bobcat Goldthwait’s legacy read like a cheap joke: He was a screaming comedian from the eighties best known as Zed in the “Police Academy” franchise who once tried at his hand at directing a movie (“Shakes the Clown”). Those achievements barely skimmed the surface of Goldthwait’s ability, as the ensuing years made clear, when Goldthwait completely transformed his career into one of the most provocative American filmmakers working today. With the microbudget “Sleeping Dogs Lie” (aka “Stay”), Goldthwait showed his potential to funnel taboo subject matters into oddly touching, relatable human dramas, a proclivity he kicked up to a whole new level with the subversive black comedy “World’s Greatest Dad,” which features Robin Williams in one of his all-time great roles.

Goldthwait has kept innovating, with each new movie offering a fresh perspective on the naive assumptions
See full article at Indiewire »

Magda Szubanski to appear in conversation with The L Word's Rose Troche

  • IF.com.au
Magda Szubanski and Rose Troche.

Actor and author Magda Szubanski is set to appear in conversation with Us writer, producer and director Rose Troche, whose credits include The L Word and Go Fish..

Presented by Screen Nsw, the event will be held June 14 at Redfern.s Giant Dwarf Theatre.

Troche is being brought to Sydney by Screen Nsw to present at the 360 Vision Virtual Reality lab intensive at Carriageworks on June 7. .

In addition to her work on Showtime's The L Word, Troche has directed episodes of Six Feet Under, Ugly Betty and Law & Order. .

Troche's Vr work Perspective Chapter 2: The Misdemeanor was shown at Sundance's New Frontiers sidebar this year.

http://giantdwarf.com.au/events/rosetroche/
See full article at IF.com.au »

Rose Troche presents Screen Nsw and ABC's 360 Vision Lab

  • IF.com.au
Director, producer and screenwriter Rose Troche (The L Word, Go Fish, Concussion) will present at the 360 Vision lab intensive being held during Vivid Sydney..

Initiated by Screen Nsw with the ABC, Screen Australia and Event Cinemas will also partner on the 360 Vision event, Australia.s first Virtual Reality development initiative..

The initiative kicks off with an intensive one-day invitation-only lab at Carriageworks to be held June 7, at which Troche will present alongside other international and Australian leaders in Vr. .

Troche is best known as the co executive producer, writer and director of the groundbreaking Showtime series The L Word.

She has also directed episodes of Six Feet Under, Ugly Betty and Law & Order, and first came to prominence in 1994 when her directorial debut Go Fish premiered at Sundance..

.I am honored to be a part of the Screen Nsw Virtual Reality event - 360 Vision. The line up is incredible and
See full article at IF.com.au »

Rose Troche presents Screen Nsw and ABC's 360 Vision lab at Vivid

  • IF.com.au
Director, producer and screenwriter Rose Troche (The L Word, Go Fish, Concussion) will present at the 360 Vision lab intensive being held during Vivid Sydney..

Initiated by Screen Nsw with the ABC, Screen Australia and Event Cinemas will also partner on the 360 Vision event, Australia.s first Virtual Reality development initiative..

The initiative kicks off with an intensive one-day invitation-only lab at Carriageworks to be held June 7, at which Troche will present alongside other international and Australian leaders in Vr. .

Troche is best known as the co executive producer, writer and director of the groundbreaking Showtime series The L Word.

She has also directed episodes of Six Feet Under, Ugly Betty and Law & Order, and first came to prominence in 1994 when her directorial debut Go Fish premiered at Sundance..

.I am honored to be a part of the Screen Nsw Virtual Reality event - 360 Vision. The line up is incredible and
See full article at IF.com.au »

Screen Australia, Event Cinemas back Vivid's Vr lab, Rose Troche to headline

  • IF.com.au
Director, producer and screenwriter Rose Troche (The L Word, Go Fish, Concussion) will present at the 360 Vision lab intensive being held during Vivid Sydney..

Initiated by Screen Nsw with the ABC, Screen Australia and Event Cinemas will also partner on the 360 Vision event, Australia.s first Virtual Reality development initiative..

The initiative kicks off with an intensive one-day invitation-only lab at Carriageworks to be held June 7, at which Troche will present alongside other international and Australian leaders in Vr. .

Troche is best known as the co executive producer, writer and director of the groundbreaking Showtime series The L Word.

She has also directed episodes of Six Feet Under, Ugly Betty and Law & Order, and first came to prominence in 1994 when her directorial debut Go Fish premiered at Sundance..

.I am honored to be a part of the Screen Nsw Virtual Reality event - 360 Vision. The line up is incredible and
See full article at IF.com.au »

How To Get Gay Divorced in 'Wedlocked'

  • Indiewire
How To Get Gay Divorced in 'Wedlocked'
Here's your daily dose of an Indie film in progress -- at the end of the week, you'll have the chance to vote for your favorite. In the meantime: is this a movie you'd want to see? Tell us in the comments. Wedlocked Tweetable Logline: Not one to be held back by unfair legislation, Sydney outsmarts the web of same-sex marriage laws keeping her unable to get divorced. Elevator Pitch: Written by Guinevere Turner (known for the screenplay adaptation of "American Psycho," "Go Fish" and "The L Word"), "Wedlocked" is a farcical comedy tackling the ridiculous laws governing gay divorce. It is the first film to bring to light the topic of state residency requirements interfering with a same sex couple's ability to get divorced. Sydney and Cameron are happily engaged, looking forward to their big day. There's one obstacle…Sydney is still married to Lisa and as their home state won't recognize their marriage,
See full article at Indiewire »

2015 Outfest Fusion Lineup Boasts Restored 'Paris Is Burning,' TV's 'Empire' and More

2015 Outfest Fusion Lineup Boasts Restored 'Paris Is Burning,' TV's 'Empire' and More
Celebrating its 12th year, Outfest Fusion is the only multicultural Lgbt film festival of its kind, running March 13-14 at the venerable Egyptian Theatre in Hollywood. Indie-pioneering writer, director and producer Rose Troche ("Go Fish," "The Safety of Objects" and Showtime's "The L Word") will receive the 2015 Fusion Achievement Award, presented by stars of "The L Word," prior to the short films gala on Saturday, March 14. On Friday the 13th, an upcoming episode of "Empire" will screen alongside a Q&A with the smash hit Fox series' producers. The event shares the evening with the Los Angeles premiere of the new digitally restored print Jennie Livingston's seminal 1990 Lgbt doc "Paris Is Burning" centered on New York City drag ball culture. The film comes courtesy of the Sundance Institute, the UCLA Film & Television Archive, the Outfest UCLA Legacy Project and Miramax. This year’s Outfest Fusion line-up...
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Guinevere Turner and Rose Troche Interview Jenni Olson about Writing, Archival and the Sundance-bound The Royal Road

At this past summer’s Frameline festival, where their Go Fish received its 20th Anniversary Screening, actress and writer Guinevere Turner and director Rose Troche interview filmmaker Jenni Olson about her Sundance-bound documentary, The Royal Road. Topics include Olson’s influences (including Chantal Akerman, James and Sadie Benning), archival documentary practice, urban landscapes and shooting on 16mm film. Check it out above.
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Who’s Afraid of Vagina Wolf heading to DVD on September 29th

Peccadillo Pictures has announced Who’s Afraid of Vagina Wolf will head to DVD on September 29th with a making of, behind the scenes, extended and deleted scenes.

Anna is a charismatic but struggling filmmaker facing a midlife crisis, having turned 40, she lives in her friend’s garage in L.A., dances in a vagina costume for money, and has neither job nor girlfriend. Just when she’s about to give up on both, she meets sexy post-feminist, Katia.

To impress her new muse, Anna decides to write and direct an all-female remake of ‘Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?’ casting Katia and her best friends Chloe and Penelope in the film. Along the way, with the help of those around her, she discovers some home truths with hilarious results.

From director Anna Margarita Albelo (A Lez in Wonderland, Hooters) comes this eccentric, semi-autobiographical romantic comedy with Albelo in her
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Who’S Afraid Of Vagina Wolf? Screens Thursday Night at QFest St. Louis

QFest St. Louis continues with Who’S Afraid Of Vagina Wolf? at 7:00 pm Thursday May 1st

QFest St. Louis, the annual gay and Lesbian Film Festival presented by Cinema St. Louis runs through May 1st and all films will be screened at The Tivoli Theater (6350 Delmar in The Loop, University City, Mo)

QFest uses the art of contemporary gay cinema to spotlight the lives of Lgbtq people and celebrate queer culture. The 2014 event features an eclectic slate of contemporary Lgbtq-themed feature films, documentaries, and shorts. Tickets are now on sale for all shows.

Who’S Afraid Of Vagina Wolf? screens at 7:00 pm Thursday May 1st

Once an adventurous jet-setter and queen of the night, Anna realizes that a life that seemed charming and adventurous in her 20s has turned desperate and dire in middle age. Currently living in her friend’s backyard tool shed, Anna has a stalled filmmaking career and,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

From 'Go Fish' to 'The L Word' to 'Creeps' on Indiegogo: Guinevere Turner Crowdfunds

  • Indiewire
From 'Go Fish' to 'The L Word' to 'Creeps' on Indiegogo: Guinevere Turner Crowdfunds
Actress-writer-director Guinevere Turner was at the forefront of the "new queer cinema" movement of the 90s with "Go Fish," the low-budget indie which she co-wrote with the film's director Rose Troche. Since then, she's had a recurring part on "The L Word" and in indies such as "Who's Afraid of Vagina Wolf?" and "Itty Bitty Titty Committee." Her list of writing credits includes "The Notorious Betty Page," "The L Word," and "American Psycho." Now Turner is turning to Indiegogo to raise funds for her latest project, "Creeps," which follows best friends Mona and Freddy as they muddle through their messy lives. The feature length comedy, which Turner will write and direct, "chronicles the highs and lows of Mona and Freddy, two best friends who decide to quit drinking and doing drugs for a week so they can have great skin for a party. By the end of this week-long struggle for sobriety,
See full article at Indiewire »

Are the sex scenes in 'Blue Is the Warmest Color' artful? Or are they 'male gaze' porn?

Are the sex scenes in 'Blue Is the Warmest Color' artful? Or are they 'male gaze' porn?
There’s something almost reassuring about the fact that in 2013, a movie sex scene could still be controversial. This time, however, the controversy isn’t coming from the forces of conservatism — from a clampdown by the ratings board or from family newspapers that don’t want to advertise a film they deem indecent. This time, the clampdown comes from the forces of the liberal-left. (That’s very 2013.) When Blue Is the Warmest Color played last month at the Cannes Film Festival, the three-hour French lesbian drama, with its lengthy and explicit scenes of bedroom intimacy, received a mostly rapturous response.
See full article at EW.com - Inside Movies »

Why Buffy's second season is the best

  • Den of Geek
Feature Juliette Harrisson 16 Apr 2013 - 07:00

In the first of a new series, Juliette makes the case for Buffy the Vampire Slayer's second season being the best of a good bunch...

This feature contains Buffy the Vampire Slayer spoilers.

Buffy the Vampire Slayer ran for seven wonderful years and many viewers thoroughly enjoyed them all. But no show, no matter how great, can keep hitting the same heights over and over again – every show has its highest points, and its lowest.

In Buffy’s case, although seasons one, four, five, and even six and seven have their fans, the competition for which season was the high point of the show is pretty much a straight fight between season two and season three.

The arguments in favour ofseason three are not to be dismissed lightly. Fighting in season three’s corner are two of Buffy’s best antagonists; Faith and the Mayor.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Black History Month Must-Watch: "The Watermelon Woman"

Tags: The Watermelon WomanCheryl DunyeGuinevere TurnerIMDb

When Cheryl Dunye made The Watermelon Woman in the mid-'90s, it was the only feature-length film about lesbian women of color — ever. Other films might have had Sapphic subtext or touch on lesbianish themes, but Dunye wrote, directed and starred in the mockumentary about a black lesbian (named Cheryl, played by Cheryl) who worked at a movie store by day and on her own films by night. Specifically she was working on a film about a black actress and singer named Fae Richards who she finds out had a sexual relationship with a white female director named Martha Page.

While delving into the secret life of Fae, Cheryl interviews a film expert, a lesbian archivist (played by Sarah Schulman, who would go on to write The Owls with Dunye) and her own mother, who was alive at the time that Fae was part
See full article at AfterEllen.com »
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