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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 24 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


Thoughts I Had While Staring at the "Table 19" Poster

11 July 2016 6:50 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Manuel here. There is nothing funnier (I guess?) than a wedding, which explains why Table 19 is the latest comedy to tackle the hilarity of seeing two people profess their love to one another in as public a venue as one can imagine. I joke, though I have to admit this sub-genre has many great examples to justify its continued deployment: Father of the Bride, Bridesmaids, My Best Friend's Wedding, Muriel's Wedding, Four Weddings and a Funeral. Heck, even Wedding Crashers and The Wedding Singer have their charm.

Will Table 19 join that esteemed group? Let's take a look at its poster:

- Can we all agree this is a pitch perfect teaser poster? It gives you a sense of tone and setting with one simple image. I do wish we'd gotten fancier nail art though.

- "Don't Fit In. Take A Number" strikes me as a better tagline for »

- Manuel Betancourt

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Cannes: Lesley Manville, James Norton, Jason Watkins, Simon Callow Join ‘Hampstead’

13 May 2016 12:11 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Cannes — Lesley Manville, who was BAFTA nominated for Mike Leigh’s “Another Year,” James Norton, who was BAFTA nominated for “Happy Valley,” Jason Watkins, who won a BAFTA for “The Lost Honor of Christopher Jefferies,” and Simon Callow, who picked up BAFTA nominations for “A Room with a View” and “Four Weddings and a Funeral,” have joined Diane Keaton and Brendan Gleeson in the cast of “Hampstead.”

Principal photography starts on May 22 in Hampstead, North London, and Central London. Inspired by true-life events the film will be directed by Joel Hopkins and produced by Robert Bernstein and Douglas Rae from Ecosse Films, with a screenplay by writer Robert Festinger. Cornerstone Films is handling international sales including North America. Motion Picture Capital will fully finance the production.

The story takes place in Hampstead Village, London, which is well-known for its beautiful and the Heath, a piece of quiet countryside in the middle of the metropolis. »

- Leo Barraclough

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Mike Newell to Direct Disney Movie About a Gorilla Named Ivan

6 May 2016 2:37 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Four Weddings and a Funeral” director Mike Newell is set to direct a big-screen adaptation of Katherine Applegate’s children’s book “The One and Only Ivan” for Disney, TheWrap has learned. Mike White is writing the script, which is about a silverback gorilla who lives in a cage in a shopping mall and finds himself caring for a baby elephant with whom he hatches a plan for escape. Allison Shearmur will produce the movie, which is based on Applegate’s Newbery Award-winning 2012 illustrated children’s book. The book sold more than 1 million copies. Also Read: Former Disney Child Star Joey Cramer Arrested for. »

- Jeff Sneider

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The Top 10 Opening Lines In Film

26 April 2016 7:19 PM, PDT | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

Like the first words out of a baby’s mouth, the first lines uttered in a film are important. These are our picks for the 10 best opening lines in film.

Spring is upon us, and what better way to celebrate the beginning of brighter days than to celebrate the best film beginnings of all time! Check back all month long as we look at the films with the best beginnings.

Check out the previous entries into this series here:

Top 10 Opening Credits Sequences in Film

Top 10 Opening Shots in Film

Top 10 Opening Scenes in Film

It can be argued that a character’s lines can move a film forward and have more of an impact on the audience than any amount of action or breathtaking filmmaking. Lines, including narrations provide a source of information often more direct than an image. It is said that a picture is worth a thousand words, »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (G.S. Perno)

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Florence Foster Jenkins review: “Near note perfect”

13 April 2016 12:00 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Florence Foster Jenkins review: Meryl Streep and Hugh Grant hit the right notes in this Stephen Frears directed comedy drama about the world’s best worst singer.

Meryl Streep and Hugh Grant lead the cast of the Stephen Frears directed film which focusses the true events of the latter days of America socialite, Florence Foster Jenkins. Here’s our Florence Foster Jenkins review.

Stephen Frears’ follow-up movie to last year’s impressive biopic The Program could not be any different, and here he teams with Nicholas Martin, a successful television writer behind episodes of Midsomer Murders, Soldier Soldier and Dalziel & Pascoe, for an brilliantly funny romp set in New York City towards the end of the second World War.

Foster Jenkins (Meryl Streep) was known for her very off-key performances as an opera singer, her appearances on-stage fully financed from her fortune left to her by her late father. At »

- Paul Heath

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'Bridget Jones's Diary': 10 Things You (Probably) Didn't Know About the Hit Comedy

12 April 2016 7:00 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

Hard to believe it's been 15 years since "Bridget Jones's Diary" surprised the world with blue soup, ugly Christmas sweaters, an unexpectedly funny Colin Firth, a shockingly nasty Hugh Grant, and a stunningly perfect English accent emerging from Texan Renée Zellweger.

Since the film adaptation of Helen Fielding's novel hit these shores on April 13, 2001, the awkward but lovable "singleton" heroine has been a worldwide favorite, spawning a 2004 sequel and a long-awaited third installment, "Bridget Jones's Baby," finally due for delivery this fall. To celebrate the film's 15th anniversary this week, here are some behind-the-scenes facts you need to know.

1. Helen Fielding's worldwide bestseller started out as a series of columns in Britain's Independent newspaper that loosely fictionalized the romantic misadventures of Fielding and her thirtysomething pals. Fielding acknowledged that she lifted her storyline from "Pride and Prejudice." "Jane Austen's plots are very good and have been market researched »

- Gary Susman

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Biographer Simon Callow on Orson Welles: ‘He Was Deeply Insecure’

8 April 2016 12:37 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Simon Callow has become the preeminent chronicler of the life and times of Orson Welles.

Over three sprawling biographies, Callow has traced Welles’ rise, fall, and years in the Hollywood wilderness. “Orson Welles: One-Man Band,” Callow’s latest book, follows the multihyphenate from  1948 to 1965. It’s a period of self-exile, one that finds the “Citizen Kane” director scrambling to cobble together money in Europe for films such as “Macbeth” and “Othello” that are daring and intermittently brilliant, but often show signs of their troubled birth and shoe-string budgets. It also recounts the making of two of Welles’ signature films — the pulpy and galvanizing “Touch of Evil” and the revelatory “Chimes at Midnight,” perhaps the most kinetic Shakespeare cinematic adaptation of all time.

Callow, an acclaimed stage and film actor in his own right who has appeared in the likes of “Four Weddings and a Funeral” and “A Room With a View, »

- Brent Lang

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Film Review: ‘The Pass’

16 March 2016 5:00 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Adapted by John Donnelly from his own well-regarded play, this directorial debut from Ben A. Williams — collaborating here with veteran British producer Duncan Kenworthy (“Four Weddings and a Funeral,” “Notting Hill”) — provides a knockout showcase for Russell Tovey as Jason, an ambitious soccer player leading a life of denial at the expense of his former bond with plucky wannabe Ade (Arinze Kene). With the drama set entirely inside three different hotel rooms, its theatrical origins are difficult to disguise, but any attempt to broaden the scope purely to feel more notionally cinematic would surely have fatally deflated its claustrophobic chamber-piece tension. Its sincere grappling with issues of fame and sexuality lends a topical urgency to a generally absorbing indie that raises the curtain with appropriate flair on the Flare London Lgbt Film Festival.

As “The Pass” opens in a Romanian hotel room the night before a big match, young Jason »

- Catherine Bray

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Duncan Kenworthy talks his under-the-radar strategy for 'The Pass'

16 March 2016 10:04 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

How the Love Actually producer guided the gay-footballers chamber piece from Royal Court sell-out to BFI Flare opening-night film.

Last night (Mar 16), The Pass opened the 30th edition of the BFI’s long-running Lgbt film festival - now called Flare - at the Odeon Leicester Square.

As well as being the first Flare opener to premiere at Odeon’s flagship cinema in 10 years, it also marked a return for Duncan Kenworthy, producer of Four Weddings And A Funeral, Notting Hill, Love Actually and The Eagle among others, who has premiered four films at the venue.

For Kenworthy, opening BFI Flare with The Pass was an optimal result for a film he self-funded and produced entirely under the radar, with the understanding that if it wasn’t a creative success, he could decide not to unveil it to the wider world. Fortunately, reviews for the Ben A. Williams-directed adaptation of John Donnelly’s play about gay footballers »

- matt.mueller@screendaily.com (Matt Mueller)

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Hugh Grant Receives British Film Institute Fellowship

23 February 2016 2:27 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Liverpool — The British Film Institute has bestowed its highest honor, the BFI Fellowship, on Hugh Grant. The award was presented to Grant on Tuesday by film producer and co-chairman of Working Title Eric Fellner at the BFI’s Chairman’s Dinner, hosted by BFI chair Greg Dyke.

Grant’s career has spanned over 30 years, 40 films and 21 TV roles. He has starred in international hits from comedies like “Four Weddings and a Funeral” to a dark turn in “An Awfully Big Adventure” and, most recently, playing opposite Meryl Streep in the soon to be released “Florence Foster Jenkins.”

Dyke said: “With impeccable comic timing and huge doses of his unique, ironic self-deprecating and very British charm, Hugh always pulls off the hardest thing of all — a seemingly effortless performance. I can assure you it’s not. Hugh’s acting talents are prodigious and his contribution to cinema enormous. He is a »

- Leo Barraclough

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Hugh Grant awarded BFI Fellowship

23 February 2016 1:00 PM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

The star of Notting Hill and the upcoming Florence Foster Jenkins received the honour at the BFI’s annual Chairman’s Dinner.

The BFI has bestowed its highest honour, the BFI Fellowship, on BAFTA and Golden Globe-winning actor Hugh Grant.

The British actor received the award during the BFI’s annual Chairman’s Dinner, which took place this evening at London’s Corinthia Hotel and also served as Greg Dyke’s retirement dinner as BFI chair.

Recent recipients include Oscar-winner Cate Blanchett and comedy icon Mel Brooks, who both received the honour last year. Other previous Fellowship recipients include Ralph Fiennes, Dame Judi Dench and Orson Welles.

BFI chairman Greg Dyke said of Grant: “With impeccable comic timing and huge doses of his unique, ironic self-deprecating and very British charm, Hugh always pulls off the hardest thing of all – a seemingly effortless performance. I can assure you it’s not. Hugh’s acting »

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Hugh Grant Awarded BFI Fellowship

23 February 2016 1:00 PM, PST | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

An actor regarded as among the most quintessentially British of Brits has been awarded the British Film Institute's highest honor. Hugh Grant, who broke out in Four Weddings and a Funeral and went on to become the U.K. rom-com king with lead roles in Notting Hill and Love, Actually, was given the BFI Fellowship at a ceremony held on Tuesday. The honor was presented by Eric Fellner, co-chairman at Working Title, which has produced many Grant-led films. The award also marked the final event presided over by Greg Dyke as chairman of the BFI. Dyke is

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- Alex Ritman

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Hugh Grant receives BFI Fellowship

23 February 2016 1:00 PM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

The star of Notting Hill and the upcoming Florence Foster Jenkins received the honour at the BFI’s annual Chairman’s Dinner.

The BFI has bestowed its highest honour, the BFI Fellowship, on BAFTA and Golden Globe-winning actor Hugh Grant.

The British actor received the award during the BFI’s annual Chairman’s Dinner, which took place this evening at London’s Corinthia Hotel.

Recent recipients include Oscar-winner Cate Blanchett and comedy icon Mel Brooks, who both received the honour last year. Other previous Fellowship recipients include Ralph Fiennes, Dame Judi Dench and Orson Welles.

BFI chairman Greg Dyke said of Grant: “With impeccable comic timing and huge doses of his unique, ironic self-deprecating and very British charm, Hugh always pulls off the hardest thing of all – a seemingly effortless performance. I can assure you it’s not. Hugh’s acting talents are prodigious and his contribution to cinema enormous.

“He is a British »

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Why are movie comedies getting so long?

23 February 2016 10:31 AM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

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Is the movie comedy that pushes two hours and change really a modern problem? And why are so many comedies so long?

Shakespeare wrote "Brevity is the soul of wit", which partly explains why there's only one good joke in Hamlet. John Michael McDonagh (Calvary, The Guard) said in an interview with this site “if it takes you two hours to tell a story you have failed as a filmmaker. 105 minutes tops is all you need if you're talented.”

The recent Tina Fey/Amy Poehler film Sisters is two hours long. While I enjoyed it, and laughed a lot, it starts to drag slightly in the middle of the party sequence, and feels like it might have benefited from a more brutal editing, killing some darlings and indulgence. It is a film with more to it than creating laughter, but not to the extent that it doesn't »

- simonbrew

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‘The Revenant’ Wins Key BAFTA Awards with Final Oscar Voting Underway (Analysis)

14 February 2016 1:51 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

It used to be that the annual BAFTA Awards could make for a quirky, equally industry-authoritative alternative to the Oscars. A ceremony date that fell after the Academy Awards and an inverted voting schematic — whereby the entire membership decided nominations and the various branches determined winners — led to interesting results that weren’t in lockstep with the season.

Films like “Romeo + Juliet” could take down key design categories. Others like “The Usual Suspects” and “Speed” could come out on top in best film editing. Local pride could show through as films such as “The Commitments,” “Four Weddings and a Funeral” and “The Full Monty,” which had little to no hope at the Oscars, could reign as best picture champs.

Things started to change 15 years ago. First came a two-month shift of date from April to just before the Oscars, right in the heat of awards season. The voting scheme kept »

- Kristopher Tapley

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London's Biggest Lgbt Film Festival to Open With Football Film 'The Pass'

11 February 2016 8:18 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Read More: Happy Pride Month: Here's 43 Great Lgbt Films To Help You Celebrate The BFI announced today that it will host first-time feature filmmaker Ben A. Williams' adaptation of "The Pass" at the opening night ceremony of this year's BFI Flare: London Lgbt Film Festival. As the UK's longest running Lgbt film event, the Flare features 50 hand-chosen submissions from nearly 23,000 submissions.  "The Pass," produced by Duncan Kenworthy of "Four Weddings and a Funeral," "Notting Hill" and "Love Actually" fame, discusses the personal and profession ramifications of coming out as an athlete. The film stars "Looking" breakout Russell Tovey as a premier league footballer who shares an intimate moment with his teammate while they room together on the night of a big international match. "'The Pass' boldly tackles a forbidden topic, outlining one man’s struggle to embrace his sexuality within the hyper masculine and »

- Elle Leonsis

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Mike Newell’s Adaptation Guernsey Eyes Rosamund Pike For Lead Role

5 February 2016 12:49 PM, PST | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Few would argue that Rosamund Pike stole the show in David Fincher’s psychological thriller Gone Girl, portraying an unhinged sociopath that still sends shivers down our spines to this day. Imagine our disappointment, then, when the Oscar-nominated actress followed up Fincher’s opus with middling thriller Return To Sender.

No matter, because Deadline reports that Pike is circling her next potential project, and it’s one that goes by the name Guernsey. Mike Newell of Four Weddings and a Funeral fame is behind the camera, and it’s understood that Pike is currently in contention to play the role of Juliet Ashton – a role that’s attracted the likes of Kate Winslet, Lily James and Rebecca Ferguson in recent times.

Billed as an adaptation of Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows’ best-seller, Guernsey is the name of a quaint island off the British coast, with the story chronicling Ashton »

- Michael Briers

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Andie MacDowell Rants On Twitter About American Airlines, Traveling “Tourist Class”

25 January 2016 11:55 AM, PST | Uinterview | See recent Uinterview news »

Andie MacDowell complained about flying American Airlines on Twitter, and was met with a considerable amount of criticism for her complaints. Andie MacDowell Airline Rant MacDowell took to Twitter to gripe about her experience flying with American Airlines over the weekend. The Four Weddings and a Funeral star was particularly piqued about being seated in what […]

The post Andie MacDowell Rants On Twitter About American Airlines, Traveling “Tourist Class” appeared first on uInterview. »

- Chelsea Regan

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Andie MacDowell Complains She Was Downgraded on Plane From First Class to "Tourist" Class Because of Her Dog

24 January 2016 1:41 PM, PST | E! Online | See recent E! Online news »

Andie MacDowell was not happy when she and her dog were downgraded from first class to what she called "tourist" class on a recent American Airlines flight. The 57-year-old Four Weddings and a FuneralMagic Mike Xxl and Groundhog Day actress took to Twitter recent to vent her frustration. "@AmericanAir Help I paid for first class & they put me in tourist because of my dog that I pre-booked & paid for," she tweeted Friday, alongside a selfie with fellow coach passengers. She doesn't look that peeved in the photo—in fact, the actress is smiling widely. MacDowell said she encountered "the rudest person I have ever had »

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For Your Consideration: Sundance is Still the First Place Next Year's Oscars Happen

21 January 2016 9:44 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Read More: The 2016 Indiewire Sundance Bible: All the Reviews, Interviews and News Posted During The Festival Editor's note: The updated version of our For Your Consideration column looks at films and events related to awards season that we find exciting and different. For detailed analysis of every Oscar category, check out our Oscar pages. Now in its third decade, the Sundance Film Festival has frequently spawned a healthy number of awards season stars, from very recent best picture contenders like "Whiplash" and "Boyhood" to earlier picks like "Four Weddings and a Funeral" (yes, both a Sundance premiere and a best picture nominee) and "Shine," to a hefty number of acting nominees (think winners like Mo'Nique for "Precious," Alan Arkin for "Little Miss Sunshine" or Hilary Swank for "Boys Don't Cry") documentary picks (from "Searching for Sugar Man" to "Man on Wire") and »

- Kate Erbland

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 24 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


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