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Is This Why the Original Ghostbusters Don't Exist in the Reboot?

21 hours ago | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

A new TV spot for the Ghostbusters reboot debuted last week that had certain corners of the fan community raising their eyebrow. And it's very strange that it is included in the marketing materials at all. But it's been cause for alarm for some people. And it's calling into question various aspects of this franchise restarter from director Paul Feig and Sony Pictures. The footage has Melissa McCarthy's Abby Yates cracking wise to Toby Huss' Officer Stevenson about the 1990 movie Ghost. Now, some fans are clinging to a new theory that this may prove the original Ghostbusters still exist in this rebooted world, and that it all ties into a phenomenon known as 'The Mandela Effect'.

'The Mandela Effect' is a very real thing, in so much as certain individuals truly believe that the conspiracy exists. And yes, it's what some might consider a wackadoo conspiracy theory. Whether »

- MovieWeb

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Tom Hanks to receive Rome fest honour

22 June 2016 5:19 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Oscar-winner Meryl Streep to also attend this year’s festival.

Oscar-winning actor Tom Tanks is to attend the 11th Rome Film Fesival (Oct 13-26), where he will receive the festival’s lifetime achievement award.

The star of Saving Private Ryan, Forrest Gump and last year’s Bridge of Spies will also be the subject of a 15-strong retrospective, including Hanks’ work as a director on That Thing You Do! (1996) and Larry Crowne (2011).

“I consider Tom Hanks to be one of the greatest actors of all time,” said the festival’s artistic director Antonio Monda.

“His extraordinary talent and profound humanity make him a classic but always contemporary actor: his films and his performances will never be dated.”

Fellow Oscar-winner Meryl Streep is also set to attend the festival where she will talk about the great Italian actresses who influenced her, including Silvana Mangano.

In addition, screenwriter and director David Mamet (Glengarry Glen Ross) will be the subject »

- michael.rosser@screendaily.com (Michael Rosser)

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See How Classic Movie Locations Look Now

14 June 2016 7:52 AM, PDT | Fandango | See recent Fandango news »

Movie-location tourism continues to be on the rise. The thing is, places don't always look the same as they did on-screen, whether because of time and changes or because it was dressed up for the film. I recently took a trip to Savannah, Georgia, for instance and was disappointed to find that the Forrest Gump bench was just a prop and never actually a part of the city's Chippewa Square. Also, often times the current owners of the location aren't welcoming to tourists. Earlier...

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- affiliates@fandango.com

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Meet the Guy Documenting Tons of Classic Movie Locations As They Look Now

13 June 2016 9:00 PM, PDT | Movies.com | See recent Movies.com news »

Movie location tourism continues to be on the rise, and it's something I quite enjoy myself. The thing is, places don't always look the same as they did on screen, whether because of time and changes or because it was dressed up for the film. I recently took a trip to Savannah, Georgia, for instance and was disappointed to find that the Forrest Gump bench was just a prop and never actually a part the city's Chippewa Square. Also, often times the current owners of the location aren't welcoming of tourists. Earlier this year, I visited the schoolhouse from Hitchcock's The Birds, which has signs all over it declaring that it's a private residence and to steer clear. We also recently shared the story of how the iconic house from the movie...

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- Christopher Campbell

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Warner Bros, and its disastrous movie summer of 1997

13 June 2016 2:21 PM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

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Warner Bros has struggled with its blockbusters of late. But back in summer 1997 - Batman & Robin's year - it faced not dissimilar problems.

Earlier this year it was revealed that Warner Bros, following a string of costly movies that hadn’t hit box office gold (Pan, Jupiter Ascending, The Man From U.N.C.L.E., In The Heart Of The Sea), was restructuring its blockbuster movie business. Fewer films, fewer risks, more franchises, and more centering around movie universes seems to be the new approach, and the appointment of a new corporate team to oversee the Harry Potter franchise last week was one part of that.

In some ways, it marks the end of an era. Whilst it retains its relationships with key directing talent (Ben Affleck, Clint Eastwood, Christopher Nolan for instance), Warner Bros was, for the bulk of the 1990s in particular, the studio that the others were trying to mimic. It worked with the same stars and filmmakers time and time again, and under then-chiefs Terry Semel and Robert Daly, relationships with key talent were paramount.

Furthermore, the studio knew to leave that talent to do its job, and was also ahead of the pack in developing franchises that it could rely on to give it a string of hits.

However, whilst Warner Bros is having troubles now, its way of doing business was first seriously challenged by the failure of its slate in the summer of 1997. Once again, it seemed to have a line up to cherish, that others were envious of. But as film by film failed to click, every facet of Warner Bros’ blockbuster strategy suddenly came under scrutiny, and would ultimately fairly dramatically change. Just two summers later, the studio released The Matrix, and blockbuster cinema changed again.

But come the start of summer 1997? These are the movies that Warner Bros had lined up, and this is what happened…

February - National Lampoon’s Vegas Vacation

Things actually had got off to a decent enough start for the studio earlier in the year, so it's worth kicking off there. It brought Chevy Chase and Beverly D’Angelo back together, for the fourth National Lampoon movie, and the first since 1989’s National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation. Interestingly, it dropped the National Lampoon moniker in the Us, and instead released the eventual movie as Vegas Vacation. It was a belated sequel, back when belated sequels weren’t that big a thing.

The film was quickly pulled apart by reviewers, but it still just about clawed a profit. The production budget of $25m was eclipsed by the Us gross of $36m, and the movie would do comfortable business on video/DVD. Not a massive hit, then, but hardly a project that had a sense of foreboding about it.

Yet the problems were not far away.

May – Father's Day

Warner Bros had a mix of movies released in the Us in March and April 1997, including modest Wesley Snipes-headlined thriller Murder At 1600, and family flick Shiloh. But it launched its summer season with Father’s Day, an expensive packaged comedy from director Ivan Reitman, starring Robin Williams and Billy Crystal. It had hit written all over it.

Father’s Day was one of the movies packaged by the CAA agency, and its then-head, Mike Ovitz (listed regularly by Premiere magazine in the 1990s as one of the most powerful men in Hollywood, if not the most powerful man). That he brought together the stars, the director and the project, gave a studio a price tag, and the studio duly paid it. Given Warner Bros’ devotion to star talent (Mel Gibson, then one of the biggest movie stars in the world, and a major Warner Bros talent, was persuaded to film a cameo), it was a natural home for the film. It quickly did the deal. few questions asked.

That package, and CAA’s fees for putting it together, brought the budget for a fairly straightforward comedy to a then-staggering $85m. The problem, though, was that the film simply wasn’t very good. It’s one of those projects that looks great on paper, less great when exposed on a great big screen. Warner Bros has snapped it up, without - it seems - even properly reading the script. 

Premiere magazine quoted a Warner Bros insider back in November 1997 as saying “when [CAA] calls and says ‘we have a package, Father’s Day, with Williams and Crystal and Reitman, we say ‘great’”, adding “we don’t scrutinise the production. When we saw the movie, it took the wind out of us. We kept reshooting and enhancing, but you can’t fix something that’s bad”.

And it was bad.

The movie would prove to be the first big misfire of the summer, grossing just $35m in the Us, and not adding a fat lot more elsewhere in the world. Warner Bros’ first film of the summer was a certified flop. More would soon follow.

May - Addicted To Love

A more modestly priced project was Addicted To Love, a romantic comedy starring Meg Ryan and Matthew Broderick. Just over a year later, Warner Bros would hit big when Meg Ryan reunited with Tom Hanks for Nora Ephron’s You’ve Got Mail. But here? The film was a modest success, at best.

Directed by Griffin Dunne (making his directorial debut), and put together in partnership with Miramax, Addicted To Love was based around the Robert Palmer song of the same name. But whilst it was sold as a romcom, the muddled final cut was actually a fair bit darker. There was an underlying nastiness to some moments in the film, and when the final box office was tallied, it came in lower than the usual returns for pictures from Ryan or Broderick. Counter-programming it against the release of The Lost World: Jurassic Park didn’t massively help in this instance either, especially as the Jurassic Park sequel would smash opening weekend records.

Addicted To Love ended up with $34.6m at the Us box office. It would eke out a small profit.

June - Batman & Robin

And this is when the alarm bells started to ring very, very loudly. Summer 1997 was supposed to be about a trio of sure-fire hit sequels: Batman 4, Jurassic Park 2 and Speed 2. Only one of those would ultimately bring home the box office bacon, the others being destroyed by critics, and ultimately leaving far more empty seats than anticipated in multiplexes.

Batman & Robin, it’s easy to forget, came off the back of 1995’s Joel Schumacher-steered Batman reboot, Batman Forever that year's biggest movie). It had one of the fastest-growing stars in the world in the Batsuit (George Clooney), and the McDonald’s deals were signed even before the script was typed up. You don’t need us to tell you that you could tell, something of a theme already in Warner Bros' summer of '97.

That said, Batman & Robin still gave Warner Bros a big opening, but in the infancy of the internet as we know it, poisonous word of mouth was already beginning to spread. The film’s negative cost Warner Bros up to $140m, before marketing and distribution costs, and it opened in the Us to a hardly-sniffy $42m of business (although that was down from previous Batman movies).

But that word of mouth still accelerated its departure from cinemas. It was then very rare for a film to make over 40% of its Us gross in its first weekend. But that’s just what Batman & Robin did, taking $107.3m in America, part of a worldwide total of $238.2m. This was the worst return for a Batman movie to date, and Warner Bros had to swiftly put the brakes on plans to get Batman Triumphant moving.

It would be eight years until Batman returned to the big screen, in Christopher Nolan’s Batman Begins. Warner Bros would undergo big changes in the intervening period.

As for the immediate aftermath of Batman & Robin? Warner Bros co-chief Robert Daly would note at the end of '97 that “we’d have been better off with more action in the picture. The movie had to service too many characters”, adding that “the next Batman we do, in three years – and we have a deal with George Clooney to do it – will have one villain”.

Fortunately, Warner Bros’ one solid hit of the summer was just around the corner…

July - Contact

And breathe out.

Warner Bros bet heavily again on expensive talent here, with Robert Zemeckis bringing his adaptation of Carl Sagan’s Contact to the studio for his first film post-Forrest Gump. Warner Bros duly footed the $90m bill (back when that was still seen as a lot of money for a movie), a good chunk of which went to Jodie Foster. It invested heavily in special effects, and gave Zemeckis licence to make the film that he wanted.

The studio was rewarded with the most intelligent and arguably the best blockbuster of the summer. I’ve looked back at Contact in a lot more detail here, and it remains a fascinating film that’s stood the test of time (and arguably influenced Christopher Nolan’s more recent Interstellar).

Reviews were strong, it looked terrific, and the initial box office was good.

But then the problem hit. For whilst Contact was a solid hit for Warner Bros, it wasn’t a massively profitable one. Had Father’s Day and Batman & Robin shouldered the box office load there were supposed to, it perhaps wouldn’t have been a problem. But when they failed to take off, the pressure shifted to Contact.

The movie would gross $100.9m in the Us, and add another $70m overseas (this being an era were international box office rarely had the importance it has today). But once Warner Bros had paid its bills, there wasn’t a fat lot over for itself. Fortunately, the film still sells on disc and on-demand. Yet it wasn’t to be the massive hit the studio needed back in 1997.

July - One Eight Seven

From director Kevin Reynolds, the man who helmed Robin Hood: Prince Of Thieves and Waterworld, came modestly-priced drama 187, starring Samuel L Jackson (in a strong performance). Warner Bros wouldn’t have had massive box office expectations for the film (although it can't have been unaware that the inspirational teacher sub-genre was always worth a few quid), and it shared production duties on the $20m movie with Mel Gibson’s Icon Productions. But still, it would have had its eye on a modest success. What it got in return was red ink.

The film’s not a bad one, and certainly worth seeking out. But poor reviews gave the film an uphill struggle from the off – smaller productions arriving mid-summer really needed critics on their side, as they arguably still do – and it opened to just $2.2m of business (the less edgy, Michelle Pfeiffer-headlined school drama Dangerous Minds had been a surprise hit not two years before).

By the time its run was done, 187 hadn’t even come close to covering its production costs, with just under $6m banked.

Warner Bros’ summer slate was running out of films. But at least it had one of its most reliable movie stars around the corner…

August - Conspiracy Theory

What could go wrong? Mel Gibson and Julia Roberts were two of the biggest movie stars in the world in 1997, at a time when movie stars still equated to box office gold. Director Richard Donner, one of Warner Bros’ favourite directors, had delivered the Lethal Weapons, Maverick, Superman, The Goonies and more for the studio. Put them altogether, with Patrick Stewart (coming to wider public consciousness at the time off the back of his Star Trek: The Next Generation work) as a villain, and it should have been a big hit.

Conspiracy Theory proved to be one of the more ambitious summer blockbusters of the era. It lacks a good first act, which would be really useful in actually setting up more of what’s going on. But Gibson played an edgy cab driver who believes in deep government conspiracies, and finds himself getting closer to the truth than those around him sometimes give him credit for.

Warner Bros was probably expecting another Lethal Weapon with the reunion of Gibson (who had to be persuaded to take Conspiracy Theory on) and Donner (it’s pretty much what it got with the hugely enjoyable Maverick a few years’ earlier), but instead it got a darker drama, with an uneasy central character that didn’t exactly play to the summer box office crowd.

The bigger problem, though, was that the film never quite worked as well as you might hope. Yet star power did have advantages. While no juggernaut, the film did decent business, grossing $137m worldwide off the back of an $80m budget ($40m of which was spent on the salaries for the talent before a single roll of film was loaded into a camera). That said, in the Us it knocked a genuine smash hit, Air Force One, off the top spot. Mind you in hindsight, that was probably the film that the studio wished it had made (the cockpit set of Warner Bros' own Executive Decision was repurposed for Air Force One, fact fans).

Still: Warner Bros did get Lethal Weapon 4 off Gibson and Donner a year later…

August - Free Willy 3: The Rescue

Yeah.

Warner Bros opened its third Free Willy film on the same day as Conspiracy Theory (can you imagine a studio opening two big films on the same day now), but it was clear that this was a franchise long past its best days (and its best days hardly bring back the fondest of memories).

Still, Free Willy movies were relatively modest in cost to put together, and Warner Bros presumably felt this was a simple cashpoint project. But in a year when lots of family movies did less business than expected (Disney’s Hercules, Fox’s Home Alone 3, Disney’s Mr Magoo), Free Willy 3 barely troubled the box office. It took in just over $3m in total, and Willy would not be seen on the inside of a cinema again.

August - Steel

Not much was expected from Steel, a superhero movie headlined by Shaquille O’Neal. Which was fortunate, because not much was had.

It had a mid-August release date in the Us, at a point when a mid-August release date was more of a dumping ground than anything else. And even though the budget was set at a relatively low $16m, the film – and it’s an overused time – pretty much bombed. It took $1.7m at the Us box office, and given that its appeal hinged on a major American sports star whose fame hardly transcended the globe, its international takings did not save it (it went straight to video in many territories).

It was a miserable end to what, for warner bros, had been a thoroughly miserable summer.

So what did hit big in summer 1997?

Summer 1997 was infamous for big films failing to take off in the way that had been expected – Hercules, Speed 2, and the aforementioned Warner Bros movies – but there were several bright spots. The big winner would be Barry Sonnenfeld’s light and sprightly sci-fi comedy Men In Black, starring Will Smith and Tommy Lee Jones. Star power too helped score big hits for Harrison Ford (Air Force One), Julia Roberts (My Best Friend’s Wedding) and John Travolta (Face/Off).

This was also the summer that Nicolas Cage cemented his action movie credentials with Face/Off and Con Air. Crucially, though, the star movies that hit were the ones that veered on the side of 'good'. For the first of many years, the internet was blamed for this.

Oh, and later in the year, incidentally, Titanic would redefine just what constituted a box office hit...

What came next for Warner Bros?

In the rest of 1997, Warner Bros had a mix of projects that again enjoyed mixed fortunes. The standout was Curtis Hanson’s stunning adaptation of L.A. Confidential, that also proved to be a surprise box office success. The Devil’s Advocate didn’t do too badly either.

However, two of the studio’s key filmmakers failed to really deliver come the end of 1997. Clint Eastwood’s Midnight In The Garden Of Good And Evil failed to ignite (although many felt he was always on a hiding to nothing in trying to adapt that for the screen), and Kevin Costner’s The Postman would prove arguably the most expensive box office disappointment of the year. No wonder the studio rushed Lethal Weapon 4 into production for summer 1998. Oh, and it had The Avengers underway too (not that one), that would prove to be a 1998 disappointment.

The studio would eventually take action. The Daly-Semel management team, that had reigned for 15 years, would break up at the end of 1999, as its traditional way of doing business became less successful. The pair had already future projects that were director driven to an extent (Eyes Wide Shut), and it would still invest in movies with stars (Wild Wild West). But the immediate plan of action following the disappointment of summer 1997 – to get Batman 5 and Superman Lives made – would falter. It wouldn’t be until 1999’s The Matrix (a film that Daly and Semel struggled to get) and – crucially – 2001’s Harry Potter And The Philosopher’s Stone that the studio would really get its swagger back...

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Movies Feature Simon Brew Warner Bros 16 Jun 2016 - 05:19 Conspiracy Theory Father's Day Addicted To Love Contact National Lampoon’s Vegas Vacation One Eight Seven Steel Batman & Robin Free Willy 3: The Rescue »

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Michael Jace, Former Actor on The Shield, Sentenced to 40 Years to Life for Killing Wife

10 June 2016 11:50 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Former The Shield actor Michael Jace was sentenced Friday to 40 years to life in prison for shooting his wife to death last April in their Los Angeles home in front of the couple's two young sons, People confirms. Jace, 53, was found guilty of second-degree murder after a week-long trial last month. The actor, who portrayed Lapd officer Julien Lowe on the FX television series The Shield, was upset his wife, April Jace, wanted a divorce, Deputy District Attorney Tannaz Mokayef told jurors in opening statements. Jace waited in their home and when April arrived, he shot her once in the back, »

- Christine Pelisek, @chrispelisek

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Michael Jace, Former Actor on The Shield, Sentenced to 40 Years to Life for Killing Wife

10 June 2016 11:50 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Former The Shield actor Michael Jace was sentenced Friday to 40 years to life in prison for shooting his wife to death last April in their Los Angeles home in front of the couple's two young sons, People confirms. Jace, 53, was found guilty of second-degree murder after a week-long trial last month. The actor, who portrayed Lapd officer Julien Lowe on the FX television series The Shield, was upset his wife, April Jace, wanted a divorce, Deputy District Attorney Tannaz Mokayef told jurors in opening statements. Jace waited in their home and when April arrived, he shot her once in the back, »

- Christine Pelisek, @chrispelisek

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Movies on Art Hill in St. Louis This July – Top Gun, Rocky, E.T., Forrest Gump

9 June 2016 7:52 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

“I just want to say hi to my girlfriend, Ok? Yo, Adrian! It’s me, Rocky!”

Everyone knows that Art Hill, in front of the St. Louis Art Museum, is a great place to go sledding in the winter. But did you know it’s a great place to see movies in July?

Their line-up for their annual Friday night film series has been announced and it’s sure to draw thousands. The We Are Movie Geeks gang always goes to these, so if you wanna hang with the cool kids, you should go too. It’s free and they set up a big screen at the bottom of the hill. There are food trucks and beer and wine for sale. You can even go dine in the museum’s restaurant before the show if you got money to burn. If you’re a museum member, you can show your »

- Tom Stockman

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Which Iconic Composer Will Score 'Avengers: Infinity War- Part I And II'?

7 June 2016 8:34 AM, PDT | LatinoReview | See recent LatinoReview news »

If you're a film score nut like me, one area where Marvel Studios has badly dropped the ball is in the music department. I grew up in an era where films about iconic characters were loaded with powerful themes and motifs that helped tie the whole experience together. Whenever a particular character entered a scene, or a certain kind of situation was taking place, the score would immediately help to identify exactly who/what we should be focusing on, or how we should be feeling.

Composer Alan Silvestri comes from that era, and his scores for films like the Back To The Future trilogy, Forrest GumpRomancing The Stone, and Father Of The Bride have withstood the test of time. His work on the Marvel films has been a little more anonymous, though. He scored Captain America: The First Avenger and The Avengers. Both were fine, and he created themes for both, »

- Mario-Francisco Robles

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News Bits: Avengers, Universal, Motel, Burn, Gun

7 June 2016 6:01 AM, PDT | Dark Horizons | See recent Dark Horizons news »

Avengers: Infinity War

Alan Silvestri ("Forrest Gump," "Flight," "Cast Away") is returning to the fold with the award-winning composer reportedly confirmed to be doing the scores for both parts of the "Avengers: Infinity War" saga at Marvel Studios.

Silvestri joined the McU with the score for "Captain America: The First Avenger" and followed that up a year later with "The Avengers," but hasn't been involved since. [Source: Cbm]

Universal Pictures

Universal Pictures has put aside three release date slots in the near future for what it's dubbing major event films. Sadly it is not announcing the titles for the projects, but it has locked in three dates: August 10th 2018, January 18th 2019 and April 10th 2020.

It's known this list does not include the various Universal monster franchise films in the works which already have dates, or the "Jurassic World" sequel which is set for June 22nd 2018. [Source: Collider]

The Voyeur's Motel

Krysty Wilson-Cairns ("Penny Dreadful, »

- Garth Franklin

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The Avengers Composer Alan Silvestri Returning To Marvel Studios To Score Infinity War Part I And II

6 June 2016 7:38 PM, PDT | ComicBookMovie.com | See recent ComicBookMovie news »

Captain America: Civil War's score was a little forgettable, so you can understand why Marvel Studios is turning to composer Alan Silvestri for the soon to be retitled Avengers: Infinity War - Part I and Part II. He worked on Captain America: The First Avenger and The Avengers, while other non-Marvel credits include Forrest Gump, The Polar Express, Night at the Museum, Flight, The Croods, and The Walk. The news of his return to the Marvel Cinematic Universe was made official by Silvestri's website where they announced: "We are pleased to announce that Alan is slated to score the Marvel films "Avengers: Infinity War - Part I and Part II." These films are scheduled for release in May of 2018 and May of 2019." It will now be up to the composer to handle such huge moment as The Avengers teaming up with Guardians of the Galaxy and Thanos finally wielding the Infinity Gauntlet! »

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Blu-ray Review – Dragnet (1987)

6 June 2016 6:55 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Dragnet, 1987.

Directed by Tom Mankiewicz.

Starring Dan Aykroyd, Tom Hanks, Christopher Plummer, Alexandra Paul, Jack O’Halloran, Harry Morgan, Elizabeth Ashley and Debney Coleman.

Synopsis:

Police Sergeant Joe Friday and his new partner Pep Streebeck investigate a pagan cult causing havoc in Los Angeles.

It was the 1980s and buddy cop movies were coming at you left, right and centre. But for every Lethal Weapon, Red Heat or Tango & Cash that meshed together witty banter and extreme violence you also got a whole bunch that were lighter in tone and went straight for the belly laughs. Some were great, some were awful, and 1987’s Dragnet falls somewhere in the middle (but closer to the great end of the spectrum).

Dan Aykroyd (Ghostbusters/The Blues Brothers) plays Sergeant Joe Friday, a straight-laced, no-nonsense cop (and nephew of the Joe Friday from the original Dragnet TV series) who takes pride in his »

- Amie Cranswick

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Interview: Director Tyler Hubby on His Tony Conrad Doc at Chicago Underground Film Festival

5 June 2016 12:34 PM, PDT | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – The great benefit of the Chicago Underground Film Festival (Cuff) is the exposure to the layers of outsider art within cinema and other categories. A prime example was the fest’s Opening Night film, “Tony Conrad: Completely in the Present,” directed by Tyler Hubby.

Tony Conrad was an underground artist, in almost a Forrest Gump-like way. He studied math at Harvard in the early 1960s, and was one of the wave of bohemians that took advantage of the crumbling infrastructure of pre-Disneyland New York City, forging art from the ruins of civilization. His contributions to music – he took the tone of a violin to new levels of sonic revelations – and film are still being felt to today, he was one of those prototypical ahead-of-his-time artists. He influenced elements of The Velvet Underground, Andy Warhol, German rock and counterculture film, with an understated presence that was about the work, »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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The Shield Actor Michael Jace Convicted of Second-Degree Murder in Killing of Wife

31 May 2016 1:00 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Former The Shield actor Michael Jace was convicted Tuesday in the fatal shooting of his wife April Jace at their Los Angeles home in front of the couple's two young sons, People confirms. The verdict was announced Tuesday after a weeklong trial. A jury of six women and six men deliberated for around two hours before finding Jace, 53, guilty of the second-degree murder of his wife on May 19, 2014. According to the Los Angeles County District Attorney's Office, he faces 40 years to life in state prison.The actor, who portrayed Lapd officer Julien Lowe on the FX television series The Shield, »

- Christine Pelisek and Aurelie Corinthios

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‘Shield’ Actor Michael Jace Found Guilty of Wife’s Murder

31 May 2016 11:00 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Actor Michael Jace, known for his work in “The Shield,” has been found guilty of second-degree murder in the shooting death of his wife two years ago, a Los Angeles jury revealed on Tuesday.

Evidence had shown that Michael Jace shot his wife, April Jace, in their Hyde Park home three times in May 2014.

Closing arguments and deliberation began on Friday following a week-long trial.

Jace’s defense attorney, Jamon Hicks, advocated for a voluntary manslaughter conviction. He argued that, while Jace did kill his wife, there was not enough evidence to determine that the actor had planned the murder.

Jace also acknowledged that he killed his wife on May 19, 2014, in sight of their two young sons. After calling 911 and waiting for police, he told detectives that he only wanted to hurt his wife, not kill her, planning to shot her in the leg with her father’s revolver.

Prosecutors »

- Alex Stedman

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Michael Jace's Murder Trial Set to Begin - The Shield Actor Is Accused of Killing his Wife

23 May 2016 4:35 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Two years after the murder of 40-year-old financial aid counselor April Jace, her husband, former The Shield actor Michael Jace is set to go on trial. Jury selection began Monday. Jace, who is best known for his role as Lapd officer Julien Lowe on the FX television series and who also had small roles in Planet of the Apes, Boogie Nights and Forrest Gump, is accused of fatally shooting his wife of more than 10 years at the couple's Los Angeles home on May 19, 2014. After the shooting, Jace called 911 and turned himself in. The popular Biola University counselor reportedly was shot »

- Christine Pelisek, @chrispelisek

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Michael Jace's Murder Trial Set to Begin - The Shield Actor Is Accused of Killing his Wife

23 May 2016 4:35 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Two years after the murder of 40-year-old financial aid counselor April Jace, her husband, former The Shield actor Michael Jace is set to go on trial. Jury selection began Monday. Jace, who is best known for his role as Lapd officer Julien Lowe on the FX television series and who also had small roles in Planet of the Apes, Boogie Nights and Forrest Gump, is accused of fatally shooting his wife of more than 10 years at the couple's Los Angeles home on May 19, 2014. After the shooting, Jace called 911 and turned himself in. The popular Biola University counselor reportedly was shot »

- Christine Pelisek, @chrispelisek

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‘House of Cards’ Star Robin Wright Demanded Equal Pay With Kevin Spacey

18 May 2016 9:19 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

When “House of Cards” star Robin Wright discovered she was being paid less than her on-screen husband and co-star Kevin Spacey, the actress did exactly what her character, Claire Underwood, would do, and closed the gap — by any means necessary.

“I was like, ‘I want to be paid the same as Kevin,'” Wright said during an interview at the Rockefeller Foundation, per the Huffington Post.

“It was the perfect paradigm. There are very few films or TV shows where the male, the patriarch, and the matriarch are equal. And they are in ‘House of Cards,'” she noted of the Netflix series. “I was looking at the statistics and Claire Underwood’s character was more popular than [Spacey’s] for a period of time. So I capitalized on it. I was like, ‘You better pay me or I’m going to go public,’ and they did.”

Wright is also an executive producer on the Netflix hit, »

- Variety Staff

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“Paterson” by Jim Jarmusch: Trying Too Hard for Not Much

16 May 2016 3:46 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Jim Jarmusch’s “Paterson” is the second film at this year’s festival with poetry as its central theme, though unlike Alejandro Jodorowsky’s surrealist extravaganza “Endless Poetry”, “Paterson” deals in the so-called poetry of the everyday and the ordinary, or prosaic poetry – and I spent the entire film unable to figure out if Jarmush was pulling the audience’s legs reciting and rehashing and superimposing on-screen verses of the sort “Today I washed my feet. Remains to be seen if tomorrow will bring toe-nail clipping”. Not literally, but almost.

Still on a high from yesterday’s jubilant South American mad fest, today the tale of small-town New Jersey haiku-weaving bus driver Paterson (Adam Driver) fell painfully short of the exhilaration that real filmed poetry can arouse. Paterson is mild-mannered, old-fashioned, and slightly dim-wit looking (his naiveté has shades of Forrest Gump). He is also exasperatingly hyper polite, thanking his »

- Zornitsa Staneva

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First Images From ‘How To Talk To Girls At Parties,’ ‘Zeroville,’ ‘Free Fire,’ and More

10 May 2016 12:18 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Today brings new images from a batch of films likely arriving this fall, the majority coming from A24. First up, perhaps our most-anticipated of the group is John Cameron Mitchell‘s adaptation of the Neil Gaman short story How To Talk To Girls At Parties. Led by Elle Fanning and Alex Sharp (seen in the first still above), the cast also includes Nicole Kidman, Ruth Wilson, and Matt Lucas.

One can see the synopsis below, followed by the first image from the Zoe Kazan-led horror feature There Are Monsters, from The Strangers director Bryan Bertino, as well as Ben Wheatley‘s star-studded actioner Free Fire, executive produced by Martin Scorsese. The only one not in the hands of A24 is James Franco‘s adaptation of Steve Erickson‘s Zeroville, which features the cast of Seth Rogen, Jacki Weaver, Megan Fox, Will Ferrell and Danny McBride.

John Cameron Mitchell, director »

- Leonard Pearce

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