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Joseph Gordon-Levitt to Replace Paul Dano in Thriller ‘7500’

Joseph Gordon-Levitt to Replace Paul Dano in Thriller ‘7500’
Joseph Gordon-Levitt will star as a co-pilot in the independent airplane hijacking thriller “7500,” replacing Paul Dano in the lead role.

Patrick Vollrath is directing from his own script with shooting starting Tuesday in Cologne and Vienna. Dano left the part due to scheduling conflicts.

FilmNation Entertainment has acquired international distribution rights and Endeavor Content is selling North American rights. “7500” will be Vollrath’s full-length feature debut following his 2015 Academy Award-nominated short, “Everything Will Be Okay.”

“7500” centers on an airline hijacking as desperate fear of the unknown undermines both hijacker and pilot. Vollrath said, “Joseph is one of the most exciting actors on the screen today, and we can’t wait to work with him and see what magic he brings to this complex role.”

The film is being produced by Jonas Katzenstein and Maximilian Leo of Augenschein Filmproduktion. Novotny’s Franz Novotny and Alexander Glehr, who produced “Egon Schiele: Death and the Maiden,” will co-produce
See full article at Variety - Film News »

"The Vampire Diaries: Death and the Maiden"

  • SneakPeek
Sneak Peek footage from "The Vampire Diaries" episode  "Death and the Maiden", the seventh episode of the Fifth Season and the ninety-sixth episode of the series, written by Rebecca Sonnenshine and directed by Leslie Libman, that aired November 14, 2013 on The CW:

"...while 'Elena' and 'Damon' try to explain the 'Amara' situation to 'Stefan', 'Dr. Wes' gives 'Katherine' some deeply disturbing news. 

"Then 'Nadia' shows up at the dorm room of 'Caroline', searching for Katherine.

"After a surprising conversation with Amara, 'Jeremy' and 'Bonnie' share a glimmer of hope.

"Finally 'Silas' fails to keep a promise, causing Damon to turn to 'Qetsiyah' for help with his new plan, while 'Stefan' makes a heartbreaking confession to Damon and Elena..."

Click the images to enlarge and Sneak Peek "The Vampire Diaries: Death And The Maiden"...
See full article at SneakPeek »

German Currents Film Festival 2017 Los Angeles

German Currents Film Festival 2017 Los Angeles
German Film in 2017 is alive and highly visible at film festivals such as Toronto, Venice, Cannes, Berlin and all the way to the Academy Awards. The best new German, Austrian, and Swiss Cinema will once again be celebrated at the American Cinematheque, during the 11th Annual German Currents Film FestivaL from Friday, October 13th — Monday, Oct 16th, 2017 at the historic Egyptian Theatre in Hollywood.

Over the past decade, German Currents has offered a unique insight into German speaking cinema, bringing diverse and thought-provoking narratives, and “must-watch” documentaries to Los Angeles. German Currents once again features an impressive line-up of new German cinema during the four day festival, including U.S. and L.A. premieres, documentaries and films for children and families.

German Currents 2017 begins with an opening night gala and red carpet with some of Germany’s brightest stars on Friday, Oct. 13th.

In addition to film screenings, German Currents
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Rep Sheet Roundup: Verve Signs Veteran Screenwriter Rafael Yglesias

Rep Sheet Roundup: Verve Signs Veteran Screenwriter Rafael Yglesias
Who got signed, promoted, hired or fired? The Hollywood Reporter’s Rep Sheet rounds up the week in representation news. To submit announcements for consideration, contact rebecca.sun@thr.com.

Scribe Signs

Novelist and screenwriter Rafael Yglesias has signed with Verve. He most recently served as an executive producer on NBC’s Aquarius. In addition to penning 10 novels, Yglesias also wrote the screenplays for Peter Weir’s Fearless, Roman Polanski’s Death and the Maiden, Billie August’s 1998 version of Les Miserables, Albert and Allen Hughes’ From Hell and Walter SallesDark Water. He continues to be managed by Russell Hollander of Hollander Entertainment.

Posed...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Rep Sheet Roundup: Verve Signs Veteran Screenwriter Rafael Yglesias

Who got signed, promoted, hired or fired? The Hollywood Reporter’s Rep Sheet rounds up the week in representation news. To submit announcements for consideration, contact rebecca.sun@thr.com.

Scribe Signs

Novelist and screenwriter Rafael Yglesias has signed with Verve. He most recently served as an executive producer on NBC’s Aquarius. In addition to penning 10 novels, Yglesias also wrote the screenplays for Peter Weir’s Fearless, Roman Polanski’s Death and the Maiden, Billie August’s 1998 version of Les Miserables, Albert and Allen Hughes’ From Hell and Walter SallesDark Water. He continues to be managed by Russell Hollander of Hollander Entertainment.

Posed...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

The Salesman | Blu-ray Review

Iranian auteur Asghar Farhadi’s The Salesman was his second film to win the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language film (following 2012’s A Separation), which began receiving accolades immediately after its premiere at the 2016 Cannes Film Festival, where it picked up awards for Best Actor and Best Screenplay. Purchased by The Cohen Media Group, the title racked up over two million at the domestic box office thanks to an awards and marketing campaign which received an additional relevancy from the political firestorm regarding a travel ban which inhibited Farhadi from attending the awards ceremony (a platform which ended up as the program’s only significant political acceptance speech from the director by proxy).

Notably, this is a return to Iran for Farhadi after his 2013 French language debut The Past, though this searing indictment on the bothersome realities of vengeance and unjustifiably gendered power ethics doesn’t reach the formidable and deliciously exacting dramatics of his 2012 Oscar and nominated Golden Berlin Bear winning A Separation. Still, Farhadi’s particular theatrics remain idiosyncratic to his interests in exploring culturally specific dynamics between men and women, and have successfully elevated the international awareness and platform of Iranian cinema, and his latest (which snagged a Best Screenplay and Best Actor win at Cannes 2016) is another strident chapter on human emotions shackled by social convention.

In the midst of rehearsing their soon to open stage production of the famous Arthur Miller play, in which they will be starring as Willy and Linda Loman, married couple Emad (Shahab Hosseini) and Rana Etesami (Taraneh Alidoosti) find themselves displaced from their newly purchased apartment when the entire complex begins to collapse. Thankfully, Babak (Babak Karimi), their co-star in the stage production, knows of a vacant apartment where the couple can immediately relocate temporarily as they await a reimbursement for their damaged apartment. Their lives suddenly in disarray, Rana mistakenly buzzes an interloper into the apartment one evening thinking it is Emad returning home, only to be physically and sexually assaulted by a man who had come to visit the previous displaced tenant, a prostitute who was greatly disliked by her socially pure neighbors. The culprit flees the scene following the indiscretion and leaves his truck behind. While Emad and Rana attempt to pick up the pieces, their emotional disconnect causes Emad to go to great lengths to solicit an eye for an eye without the interference of the law.

The opening sequences of The Salesman provide the film with its overarching metaphor of an irreparable foundational disturbance, the unsecure building and subsequent evacuation resulting in a dramatic ripple effect. Just as the central couple in A Separation is (at least partially defined) by their parental roles, Rana and Emad’s predicament here is also born out of their childlessness. Devotees of the theater, (Miller’s tweaked text, including side jokes about the downplayed sexuality of the prostitute character Miss Francis is merely a backdrop and superficial subtext), it is inferred the Etesamis and their untraditional lives and interests are the potential cause for their current state of tragic duress. The power of suggestion is the significant thread connecting (and strangling) the major movements of The Salesman, which uses Miller not so much as a treatment of American vs. Iranian values, but as an experimental, doubling arena for the theatrical business of life.

The actress playing Miss Francis in the play assumes she is being demeaned by a male co-star because portraying a woman of easy virtue invites automatic disrespect; Babak becomes infuriated at Emad adlibbing incendiary lines during a performance; a woman in a taxi is convinced Emad aims to molest her because he sits with his legs open; and, ultimately, it is Rana’s fault she was raped because she didn’t bother to check who she opened the front door of her apartment to. Had Rana and Emad had children or more conventional professions, their own lackadaisically defined routines would have been in automatic check, or so the social circles around them in The Salesman seem to imply.

We sympathize more with Shahab Hosseini’s Emad, whose chronic frustration boils over into a Death and the Maiden style attempt at truth as vengeance. Because Farhadi, once again, only implies the trauma exacted upon Rana in her shower, it allows for us to be more estranged from her untoward behavior and subsequent victimhood and more celebratory of Emad’s impassioned attempt to rectify the situation by saving his pride (and, perhaps to a lesser degree, his wife’s reputation). Farhadi reunites with his About Elly (2008) cinematographer Hossein Jafarian to construct a careful examination of bodies in spaces, the suggested control and inherent power plays in blocking.

The final, intense third act returns us to the unsafe space of the crumbling façade, a touching metaphor for the grisly and unappealing outcome of Emad’s desperate ploy for closure and revenge. But as in previous works, Farhadi’s strength lies in his ability to cast adept performers able to convey the subtle complexities of his prose, and what Taraneh Alidoosti and Shahab Hosseini (both who have previously appeared in Farhadi’s films) achieve here is exciting as it is troubling for Farhadi forces us to ask why do we sympathize with Emad and not Rana? The audience, like the community and culture around Rana, become complicit in their inability to empathize with either females or victimhood. Until the magnificent finale, that is, when Emad and company (including a particularly arresting late staged supporting turn from Farid Sajjadhosseini) are taken to task, and satisfaction for anyone quickly dissipates into the realm of the impossible.

Disc Review:

For the film’s first availability on Blu-ray, this Sony release isn’t quite as persuasive as most of Cohen Media Group’s usual home entertainment releases. Presented in 1.85:1 with DTS-hd Master Audio, picture and sound quality are serviceably transferred in this high definition package. A lone extra feature begs for a more illustrious presentation for the lauded title, however.

A Conversation:

An interview with writer-director Asghar Farhadi on the origins and making of The Salesman is available as a bonus feature.

Final Thoughts:

In the same vein as Farhadi’s other tautly constructed social issue melodramas, The Salesman is another aggravating ripple effect of confounded displacement and fractured foundations.

Film Review: ★★★½/☆☆☆☆☆

Disc Review: ★★★/☆☆☆☆☆

The post The Salesman | Blu-ray Review appeared first on Ioncinema.com.
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Berlinale: Mister Smith Entertainment Takes International Sales on Terrence Malick’s ‘Radegund’

Berlinale: Mister Smith Entertainment Takes International Sales on Terrence Malick’s ‘Radegund’
London-based Mister Smith Entertainment has acquired international sales rights to Terrence Malick’s “Radegund,” picking up what is sure to be one of the high-profile movies at next month’s European Film Market alongside the Berlin Film Festival.

Marking Malick’s return to World War II two decades after “The Thin Red Line,” “Radegund” tells the true story of Franz Jaegerstaetter, an Austrian farmer who, after Germany annexed Austria in 1938, refused to fight for the Third Reich. Written by Malick, the story is told through a series of real wartime letters between Jaegerstaetter and his wife, with Jaegerstaetter’s opposition to the Third Reich placing the couple at odds with members of their town, church and government.

August Diehl (“Inglourious Basterds”) plays Jaegerstaetter; Valerie Pachner (“Egon SchieleDeath and the Maiden”) plays his wife, Fani; and Matthias Schoenaerts (“Rust and Bone”) plays Captain Herder.

Malick’s longterm production partner Grant Hill (“The Tree of Life,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Afm: German Money Boosts Projects Across Borders

Germany has long been the powerhouse driving the economy in Europe, and in recent years its film and TV industries have likewise developed into major players at home and on the international scene.

The country’s sales agents are becoming more involved earlier in the production process due to creators’ financial needs and the agents’ financial connections, says Mariette Rissenbeek, managing director of German Films.

“Projects of well-known independent filmmakers can only be financed by involving international distributors or producers at an early stage,” Rissenbeek says. “German TV series with a high creative level and a high production level also demand international financing in order to be able to get started. Accordingly, German sales agents are more and more involved with this type of pre-sales and co-financing as they are well-connected to the international film and TV industry.”

In the TV arena, she notes, “a number of larger sales companies
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Chariots of Fire’ Conductor Harry Rabinowitz Dies at 100

‘Chariots of Fire’ Conductor Harry Rabinowitz Dies at 100
Conductor and composer Harry Rabinowitz, who worked on more than 60 films including as the conductor on “Chariots of Fire,” has died at the age of 100, according to the BBC.

Rabinowitz was born in Johannesburg in 1916, and moved to England in 1946 to study at London’s Guildhall School of Music and Drama.

He served as head of music at BBC TV Light Entertainment in the 1960s, and as head of music services at London Weekend Television in the 1970s. In 1977 he was awarded a national honor, the MBE.

He composed scores for many TV shows including “Reilly: Ace of Spies,” for which he received a BAFTA nomination in 1984.

Rabinowitz worked as a conductor on several films with British director Anthony Minghella, including “The English Patient,” “The Talented Mr. Ripley” and “Cold Mountain.” He also worked on many Merchant Ivory pictures, including James Ivory’s “The Remains of the Day” and “Howards End.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Picture Tree Boards Matthias Schweighoefer Comedy ‘The Most Beautiful Day’ (Exclusive)

Picture Tree Boards Matthias Schweighoefer Comedy ‘The Most Beautiful Day’ (Exclusive)
London — Berlin-based sales company Picture Tree Intl. has picked up road-movie comedy “The Most Beautiful Day,” which toplines Matthias Schweighoefer, one of Germany’s biggest film stars. The movie will make its market premiere on Feb. 12 at Berlin’s European Film Market.

The film, which Florian David Fitz directs and co-stars in, will be released in Germany by Warner Bros. Hopes are high that it’ll follow the path set by other recent German comedies, such as “Fack Ju Goehte 2,” which have crossed-over into the mainstream and become box-office hits, as well as selling widely abroad.

The pic centers on quirky, overambitious pianist Andi and the happy-go-lucky, laid-back Benno. They have just one thing in common: both are diagnosed with a fatal disease. With their end seemingly around the corner, Benno convinces Andi to escape the dead-end hospice and to go on a road trip in search of their last and most awesome day.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Picture Tree readies German distribution push

  • ScreenDaily
Picture Tree readies German distribution push
Elisabeth Scharang’s Jack, Simon Jaquemet’s War (Chrieg) earmarked for local distribution.

German sales company Picture Tree International (Pti) is to expand into local theatrical distribution with two titles from its sales line-up: Swiss director Simon Jaquemet’s drama War (Chrieg) and Elisabeth Scharang’s Locarno debut Jack.

Picture Tree has set an April 28 release for War (Chrieg), which debuted at San Sebastian 2014 and screened at Berlin 2015, while Jack is set for release later in the year.

Speaking to ScreenDaily from Sundance at the weekend, Pti managing director Andreas Rothbauer discussed the push into local distribution.

“We initially want to gather some experience with a few of our sales titles provided they weren’t already licensed to a German distributor,” Rothbauer explained.

“World sales is our core business and, depending on this, we will decide which film might make sense for in-house distribution. However, as the German market is very competitive, I think that
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Five Films by Patricio Guzmán | DVD Review

As Patricio Guzman’s latest documentary The Pearl Button, which premiered at the 2015 Berlin Film Festival, completes its festival circuit rounds, a comprehensive box set of the famed Chilean documentarian’s most iconic works arrives on DVD. One of the world’s most noted masters of the medium, Guzman’s works provide an invaluable framework of his country’s violent past following the socialist revolution and violent coup which resulted in seventeen years of a harsh and violent dictatorship under the rule of Augusto Pinochet. Beginning with the three part saga The Battle of Chile, this eight disc set includes all of his most notable major historical and political documentaries through 2011’s Nostalgia for the Light. Though the collection is not a complete account of Guzman’s filmography, it’s a thematic distillation of a country’s harrowing history, and Guzman’s footage evolves from an initial priceless account of
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Recounting Mike Nichols' climb from comedian to Egot-winner

  • Hitfix
Recounting Mike Nichols' climb from comedian to Egot-winner
When people pass away, we often praise them with, "What couldn’t they do?" Exaggeration. With Mike Nichols, there’s really no answer to the theoretical. A seasoned comedian, a pillar of New York City theater, a successful film director — earning a Best Picture nomination, four Best Director nominations, and one win in the latter category — and one of only 12 people to successfully collect the coveted Egot, when it came to the entertainment industry, there really wasn’t anything he couldn’t do. He went out on a high. Thursday morning, we learned that Nichols passed away at the age of 83. Fleeing Nazi-occupied Germany in 1938, Nichols wound up in New York City and called the city home for nearly his entire life. Attending college in Chicago, he became part of the theater and comedy scenes, joining Second City and forming the comedy duo Nichols and May, along with actress Elaine May.
See full article at Hitfix »

Venus in Fur | DVD Review

While it went home empty handed after competing in Cannes, and was released in dozens of territories before Sundance Selects dropped the title onto the market this past April, Venus In Fur did manage to rack up seven Cesar award nominates back home and netted Roman Polanski the Best Director prize. Dark, playful, and featuring a dizzying performance from Emmanuelle Seigner, the title is destined to be one of the year’s most overlooked gems.

The once quite reticent Polanski quickly returned with yet another adaptation of a popular Broadway play. Working from the same stage title, this followed his 2011 star studded Carnage. Say what you will, but Polanski, who often tends to favor claustrophobic chamber pieces, excels with chatty subversiveness, and detractors of the sometimes forced Carnage should revel in this latest effort, a dark labyrinth of comedic mind games that does with words what something like Lady from Shanghai does with mirrors.
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Venus In Fur – The Review

Venus In Fur is from American playwright David Ives’ Tony Award-winning play, a two-character S&M tale set in New York. Now comes the film version, which is set in Paris and is in French. C’est quoi ce bordel? It’s the latest movie directed by 80-year old perv Roman Polanksi who has cast his pretty 46-year old French wife Emmanuelle Seigner in the lead. Venus In Fur is a kinky backstage tango that never quite sizzles, but it’s still an entertaining and often funny riff on the issues of sex and power. I just wish it had been filmed in English.

Venus In Fur opens with stage writer-director Thomas (Mathieu Amalric) alone in a Paris theater after a long day of auditioning actresses for his new play, an adaptation of an 18th century erotic tale that explores the explosive relationship between a domineering mistress and her submissive male subject/slave.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Venus in Fur | Review

Mighty Aphrodite: Polanski Returns With Spirited Adaptation

The once quite reticent Roman Polanski quickly returns with yet another adaptation of a popular Broadway play, Venus In Fur, which follows his 2011 star studded Carnage. Say what you will, but Polanski, who often tends to favor claustrophobic chamber pieces, excels with chatty subversiveness, and detractors of the sometimes forced Carnage should revel in this latest effort, a dark labyrinth of comedic mind games that does with words what something like Lady from Shanghai does with mirrors.

A dreary, desolate evening sees a desperate theater director, Thomas (Mathieu Amalric) pacing the stage as he bitches angrily on the phone about the miserable auditions he witnessed all day long for the lead in his new play, Venus In Furs, an adaptation of an infamous novel credited with birthing the term masochism. Clearly, the play is a labor of love for the man, and
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Top 10 performances in Roman Polanski films

  • Hitfix
Tomorrow, more than a year after its Cannes Competition premiere, Roman Polanski's "Venus in Fur" finally opens in Us theaters. It's the 20th narrative feature of a career that now spans six decades, so a list themed around the Oscar-winning director's work seemed in order. Given that "Venus in Fur" -- Polanski's third film, after "Death and the Maiden" and "Carnage," to replicate the scale and pace of an intimate stage production -- is based so explicitly around notions of performance, and the push-pull relationship between actor and director, a selection of his most successful actorly collaborations seemed the obvious way to go. Like so many auteurs celebrated for their own idiosyncratic style, Polanski's facility with actors isn't discussed as frequently as his formal abilities and preoccupations, yet he's always had the knack for drawing surprising work out of established stars and newcomers alike -- often casting actors intriguingly out of their element,
See full article at Hitfix »

Photo Flash: First Look at Sandra Oh and More in Death And The Maiden at Chicago's Victory Gardens Theater

Victory Gardens Theater continues its 2013-2014 season with Death and the Maiden by Ariel Dorfman, directed by Artistic Director Chay Yew. Death and the Maiden runs now through July 13, 2014, with the press performance on June 20, 2014, at Victory Gardens Theatre, 2433 N. Lincoln Avenue. The cast of Death and the Maiden includes Raul Castillo, John Judd and Sandra Oh. Below, BroadwayWorld has a first look at the cast in action
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Wake Up with Bww 6/13/14 - Buyer & Cellar, Queen Margherita, Sandra Oh, Mermaid at Tuts & Father's Day!

Good morning, BroadwayWorld Because we know all our readers eat, sleep and breathe Broadway, what could be better than waking up to it Today's big news On this lovely Father's Day weekend, Buyer amp Cellar celebrates 400 performances off-Broadway, Lesli Margherita addresses her subjects at 54 Below tonight, Sandra Oh, known to most as 'Cristina Yang' from Grey's Anatomy, stars in Death And The Maiden in Chicago, and Jessica Grove leads a starry cast in The Little Mermaid in Houston
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

Colcoa: French-Language Showcase Reflects Recent Gallic Cinema

Colcoa: French-Language Showcase Reflects Recent Gallic Cinema
That annual L.A. rite of spring known as the City of Lights, City of Angels (April 21-28) is back for its 18th year with a lineup of French-language films that just might eclipse all previous editions. Colcoa exec producer and artistic director Francois Truffart calls it the biggest program ever, both in terms of quality and quantity.

Of the record 61 features and shorts in the mix, vs. last year’s 57, this batch mixes established directors like Claude Lelouch (whose “We Love You, You Bastard” opens the fest), Catherine Breillat, Diane Kurys, Cedric Klapisch and Francois Ozon with such first-time feature filmmakers Francois-Xavier Vives, Yannick Saillet, David Perrault and Helier Cisterne.

One of Truffart’s bigger coups was securing the West Coast premiere of Paris-based Roman Polanski’s psychological drama “Venus in Fur,” based on the David Ives play that stars Polanski’s wife, Emmanuelle Seigner, opposite Mathieu Amalric. This
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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