5.7/10
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3 user 3 critic

Cosmic Slop (1994)

| Sci-Fi | TV Movie
A science fiction anthology series that aired on HBO. It was hosted by Parliament lead singer George Clinton. It also starred Casey Kasey, Robert Guillaume, and Anthony Anderson.

Writers:

(segment), (short story "The Space Traders") | 3 more credits »
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2 wins & 4 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Credited cast:
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Possessed churchgoer ("The First Commandment")
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Stryker O'Rourke (segment "Space Traders")
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Virgin Mary / Oshun (segment "The First Commandment")
Jason Bernard ...
Bernard Shields (segment "Space Traders")
Arthur Burghardt ...
Justin Jasper (segment "Space Traders")
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(segment "The First Commandment")
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Host
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Chief of Staff (segment "Space Traders")
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Padrino (segment "The First Commandment")
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General Wright (segment "Space Traders")
Ngwebifor Fobi ...
Dark Skinned Human
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Gleason Golightly (segment "Space Traders")
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Cardinal (segment "The First Commandment")
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Special Appearance
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Lenny (segment "Space Traders")
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Storyline

In the tradition of The Twilight Zone, this bizarre, thought-provoking trilogy addresses the destiny of the world's minorities: Part I: A conservative African American politician must choose between his people's survival and appeasing his white colleagues when space aliens propose to share their profound knowledge in exchange for all black people on earth. Part II: The Virgin Mary's appearance in an inner-city housing project forces a Hispanic priest to face the hidden cultural origins of Western religion. Part III: On the dawn of the "Black Revolution," an African American couple discovers who the "real" enemy is. Written by Lammastide

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Sci-Fi

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Also Known As:

Invasão Cósmica  »

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Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The title is taken from a song by funk legend 'George Clinton''s band, Funkadelic. See more »

Soundtracks

Main Theme "Cosmic Slop"
Composed by George Clinton and Bernard Worrell
Performed by John Barnes
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User Reviews

Required Viewing to Understand Bad Societal Logic
30 April 2015 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Before I get started on the rant, let me just say this is a well-produced anthology from HBO, with some good name actors (Nick Turturro doing his usual fine interpretation). Now let's get to the meat of this:

(1) SPACE TRADERS. You can tell liberal/progressive/Democrat/leftist thought was at work here, desperately trying to show how evil Republicans are, when it is well-known, or should be, that the Republican Party, beginning with Lincoln, fought tooth and nail for civil rights, from before the Civil War to the present, and that the Democrat Party voted to block civil rights well into the 1980's, and actually began the Ku Klux Klan, which it fostered into the 1930's and beyond. Thus, when the Republican Party in this vignette gleefully sells out the black population of the United States, it just ain't so, even if people believe it. The piece is well-orchestrated on film, showing how government in general is filthy and corrupt in the hands of a few men, but I was perplexed why the black folk were shown as docile for the most part, and why no white Americans were shown either as dissenters. In order to make a particular point, the writers emasculated every Republican, Democrat, white, and black! Are these people ALL on Prozac? One more thing: melanin content also includes Native Americans, Indians, Filipino, Latino, and tanned whites. So the logic is missing. The story is not racist as much as it is politically and socially abhorrent. And honestly, the question must be asked, why is it the writer believes black people are so valueless that white people would want them gone? Is this true? Why? Whose fault is that? If the answer is that we must have sympathy, when does that run out? This leads to the next chapter:

THE FIRST COMMANDMENT: Well-played but in this one we get a view that the white priest is "stealing" the Santeria "culture" from Puerto Ricans. Point to be made: Santeria possibly predates Christ, but not the law of God given to Moses, so the sympathy parlayed on the antiquity of Santeria does not withstand further pressure of truth, or assumed truth. Santeria itself involves pagan rituals not portrayed in this portion of the film, and therefore the filmmakers omitted anything prejudicial against Santeria to, again, make a point. Attempting to officiate names for Virgin Mary may appear clever but it is mainly juvenile, simple rebellion. The question must be asked, why is Santeria right? Why is possession of human souls good? Why not simply follow God's Law?

TANG: Realistic portrait of black thought process and culture, one wonders how this fits with SPACE TRADERS, as it completely justifies the point resisted in Chapter 1, that black people have horrible views of whites, themselves, women, men, violence, law, and revenge. It does not glorify gangster lifestyle, being in 1994 a bit too early for that, but it is starkly in-your-face "this is it." When Tang thanks God for the bullets to start the so-called revolution, your brain may literally explode. Really? God provides guns and bullets? If this is so, why is it bad for whites to have guns but not blacks? But then the gun is used to kill each other, as the entire neighborhood is doing. What is God saying? That blacks need to off themselves? The fact that the gun was delivered by a ghostly being makes it crazier. If that was a minion of the devil, is that point that blacks can't tell God from the devil?

All in all, this is required viewing, not for the production, the message, or anything really unique, but simply to gape in awe at how skewed people can be, and how hopeless it probably is to expect the human race to come to terms with its own anti-intellectual, anti-education, anti-history perception. After watching this, you should ask if making a difference even makes a difference.


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