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Brad Renfro: Inside the Actor's Shocking Death at 25 and Quick Rise to Fame

Brad Renfro: Inside the Actor's Shocking Death at 25 and Quick Rise to Fame
It’s been nearly a decade since the tragic death of former child actor Brad Renfro. During his too-short career he made over 20 movies, the last one being 2008’s The Informers, where he starred alongside Billy Bob Thornton and Winona Ryder. The Apt Pupil star was a gifted actor who battled several off-screen demons, which ultimately ended the life of the 25-year-old.

A Star on the Rise

The Knoxville, Tennessee native was only 10-years-old when he was discovered by director Joel Schumacher to play Mark Sway, a young witness in a Mafia case, in his 1994 movie The Client. In the film,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Robert Getchell, 'Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore' Screenwriter, Dies at 81

Robert Getchell, who received Oscar nominations for his screenplays for Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore and Bound for Glory, has died. He was 81.

Getchell died Oct. 21, according to a funeral home in Monterey, California. No other details of his death were available.

Getchell also co-wrote Mommie Dearest (1981), starring Faye Dunaway as Joan Crawford, and John Badham’s Point of No Return (1993), and he did adapted screenplays for Stella (1990), starring Bette Midler; This Boy's Life (1993), starring Robert De Niro and Leonardo DiCaprio; and John Grisham's The Client (1994), directed by Joel Schumacher.

Getchell’s first screenplay...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Robert Getchell, 'Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore' Screenwriter, Dies at 81

Robert Getchell, who received Oscar nominations for his screenplays for Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore and Bound for Glory, has died. He was 81.

Getchell died Oct. 21, according to a funeral home in Monterey, California. No other details of his death were available.

Getchell also co-wrote Mommie Dearest (1981), starring Faye Dunaway as Joan Crawford, and John Badham’s Point of No Return (1993), and he did adapted screenplays for Stella (1990), starring Bette Midler; This Boy's Life (1993), starring Robert De Niro and Leonardo DiCaprio; and John Grisham's The Client (1994), directed by Joel Schumacher.

Getchell’s first screenplay...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

John Heard Dead at 72; TV Roles Included The Sopranos, Prison Break

John Heard Dead at 72; TV Roles Included The Sopranos, Prison Break
Veteran actor John Heard, familiar to many as Macaulay Culkin’s Home Alone pop, was found dead on Friday in a Palo Alto, Calif. hotel room. He was 72.

A cause of death is not yet known, reports TMZ.

On the smaller screen, Heard’s credits included CBS’ adaptation of the 1994 John Grisham film The Client, The Sopranos (for which he earned an Emmy nomination as corrupt cop Vin Makazian), Jack & Bobby, Prison Break (playing Sara Tancredi’s governor father), NCIS: Los Angeles and, most recently, spring episodes of Fox’s APB and WGN America’s Outsiders.

In addition to his turns as Peter McCallister,
See full article at TVLine.com »

Batman & Robin: the apologies & thoughts of its cast & crew

Rob Leane Jun 19, 2017

Joel Schumacher has just apologised (again) about Batman & Robin, a film that lots of talented people are sorry about...

It may have shifted a fair few toys and given us some great Arnie lines to recite, but Joel Schumacher’s Batman & Robin will mainly be remembered as a franchise killer. What Tim Burton began with the luscious, gothic brace of Batman and Batman Returns, Schumacher well and truly wrote off with the colourful crapness of Batman & Robin.

The Bat-franchise managed to live on after Jim Carrey and Tommy Lee Jones chewed the scenery into tiny little pieces during Batman Forever, but Bat-nipples, “cool party!”, and Alfred making a skin-tight costume for his niece was just too much for the series to survive.

Nowadays, if reviewers savage a film, the cast and crew come out and defend it. They say things like ‘we made this for the fans,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Joel Schumacher Apologizes for Batman and Robin 20 Years Later

Joel Schumacher Apologizes for Batman and Robin 20 Years Later
Batman has had an interesting history on screen. The character goes from huge highs, like The Dark Knight, to pretty big lows, like Batman & Robin, a movie that many consider to be one of the worst superhero movies of all time. Now, the man responsible for that dreadful disaster of a Batman movie, director Joel Schumacher, has officially apologized for making it.

In honor (is honor the right word?) of Batman & Robin turning twenty this year, Vice spoke with Joel Schumacher about his time with the Batman franchise. One of the first things he did while talking to the publication was straight-up say sorry for Batman & Robin.

"Look, I apologize. I want to apologize to every fan that was disappointed because I think I owe them that."

Joel Schumacher now joins George Clooney, who played Bruce Wayne/Batman in Batman & Robin, who also apologized publicly for the movie. It is
See full article at MovieWeb »

Susan Sarandon Joins Showtime’s ‘Ray Donovan’ as Studio Boss

Susan Sarandon Joins Showtime’s ‘Ray Donovan’ as Studio Boss
Oscar-winning actress Susan Sarandon will join the cast of Showtime’s “Ray Donovan” for the show’s fifth season, the network announced on Monday. Sarandon will have a recurring role on the drama as a strong, focused head of a motion picture studio by the name of Samantha Winslow. An Oscar winner for “Dead Man Walking,” Sarandon also received nominations for “Thelma and Louise,” “Lorenzo’s Oil,” “The Client” and “Atlantic City.” In 2010, she received her fourth Emmy nomination for her work in Barry Levinson’s “You Don’t Know Jack” with Al Pacino, following a lead actress nomination in the film Bernard and Doris.
See full article at The Wrap »

The Best Of The Best -The Greatest Actresses and the roles that made them great

Author: Dave Roper

Actors, Writers, Directors, they all have their part to play and all have their echelons of excellence. For every Scorsese working at the top of their game, there’s a journeyman like Peter Berg and then a hack like McG (sorry to any McG fans out there). It’s all (obviously) much the same with the greatest actresses too – some consistently hit high notes, others work faithfully but perhaps unexceptionally and others struggle to ever escape derivative and low-brow work. Here are a few who fall squarely in the first group.

Susan SarandonDead Man Walking

Susan Sarandon is often underappreciated and underrated for her versatility. Consider the contrast between her campaigning, gracious nun in Dead Man Walking, her feisty southerner in Thelma & Louise, her boo-hiss Queen in Enchanted, the comparative gentleness (but definitely not blandness) of her roles in Robot & Frank and Elizabethtown and the oomph
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Audition Polaroids Of Actors From The 1980s from Casting Director Mali Finn

Mali Finn was an American casting director and former English and drama teacher. She cast numerous actors in successful films, including Edward Furlong, Leonardo DiCaprio, and Russell Crowe. She already had a handful of casting credits on her résumé, including The Untouchables (1987), when she established her own firm, Mali Finn Casting, in ’89. She boosted Leonardo DiCaprio’s career by casting him in the James Cameron film Titanic (1997); she also cast Russell Crowe in L.A. Confidential (1997). Finn discovered actor Brad Renfro when he was ten years old and cast him in Joel Schumacher’s The Client (1994). Recently a

Audition Polaroids Of Actors From The 1980s from Casting Director Mali Finn
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Another Adaptation of John Grisham’s ‘The Rainmaker’ in the Works at CBS

Another Adaptation of John Grisham’s ‘The Rainmaker’ in the Works at CBS
The 1990s was a good time to be a John Grisham fan. For a decade or so, the author had many of his novels successfully adapted. From The Client, A Time to Kill, The Firm, to even Robert Altman’s shaggy but atmospheric The Gingerbread Man, Hollywood was making some good dramas with Grisham’s material, and […]

The post Another Adaptation of John Grisham’s ‘The Rainmaker’ in the Works at CBS appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

John Grisham’s ‘The Rainmaker’ Gets Adapted Again As New TV Series

In the string of John Grisham adaptations that arrived in the 1990s —legal thrillers like “The Firm,” “The Pelican Brief,” “The Client” and “A Time To Kill“— Francis Ford Coppola‘s “The Rainmaker” starring Matt Damon might be better remembered than “The Chamber,” but it’s still considered to be among the less successful of the lot.

Continue reading John Grisham’s ‘The Rainmaker’ Gets Adapted Again As New TV Series at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Directors Who Damaged Their Careers Part 5 – The One Who Made Batman & Robin

Graeme Robertson continues his series looking at directors who damaged their careers; next up is Michael Sarne (read the first part on Richard Kelly here, the second part on Michael Cimino here, the third part on George Lucas here, and the fourth part on Michael Sarne here)…

Joel Schumacher is a strange addition to this series, mainly because his career implosion occurred much slower than previous entries, and somehow managing to survive a colossal disaster of a film that would have ended most careers. Not only surviving, but also continuing to make films with significant backing, before almost completely finishing it off by making one stinker too many.

Schumacher originally made his name as a director in the 1980s; bringing us films featuring the then popular “brat pack” group of actors, directing successful movies like St Elmo’s Fire (1984), The Lost Boys (1987).

Schumacher continuing his winning streak into the 1990s
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Film Adaptation of Stephen King’s Doctor Sleep Moving Forward at Warner Bros.

Doctor Sleep, the sequel to Stephen King’s epic 1977 novel, The Shining, is being adapted for the big screen at Warner Bros., and a writer for the adapted screenplay has now been revealed.

The Tracking Board reports that Akiva Goldsman has been set to write the screenplay adaptation of King’s 2013 novel Doctor Sleep, which follows a grown-up Danny Torrance, who, with the Overlook Hotel and his father’s descent into madness decades in the rearview mirror, now works at a nursing home and must face a creepy collection of people known as The True Knot.

Stephen King will executive produce the Doctor Sleep film, with Jon Berg and Jon Gonda supervising the project on behalf of Warner Bros. A release date and director have yet to be revealed, but we’ll keep Daily Dead readers updated on future details.

Goldsman is no stranger to King’s work, having contributed
See full article at DailyDead »

Susan Sarandon to Be Honored With CinemaCon Award

Susan Sarandon to Be Honored With CinemaCon Award
Susan Sarandon will be honored with CinemaCon’s Cinema Icon Award.

The prize will be presented to the actress at the conference’s Big Screen Achievement Awards ceremony on April 14 at Caesars Palace, it was announced on Monday.

Sarandon received Oscar nominations for her roles in “Atlantic City” (1980), “Thelma and Louise” (1991), “Lorenzo’s Oil” (1992) and “The Client” (1994). She nabbed her first Oscar in 1996 for her performance as Sister Helen Prejean in the crime drama “Dead Man Walking.” Sarandon has also acted on television, starring in the HBO TV movies “Bernard and Doris” (2006) and “You Don’t Know Jack” (2010), and guest starring on hit shows such as “Friends,” “Mike & Molly,” “Malcolm in the Middle” and “30 Rock.” Sarandon stars alongside Rose Byrne in the upcoming dramedy “The Meddler,” which hits theaters on April 22.

“Since making her feature film debut in 1970’s ‘Joe,’ Susan Sarandon has brought some of the most unforgettable and
See full article at Variety - Film News »

15 Comic Book Movie Actors Who Were Replaced In The Sequels

Fox

Imagine being the guy who once played the most important villain in the Marvel Cinematic Universe before he was important. Or turning your back on being Batman’s love interest just before you would have got a juicy chance to die. Or suffering the sting of being the only one unceremoniously booted out of a film and watching your former colleagues get back together for sequels without you.

That ignominy is a surprisingly regular thing for actors who have taken on a comic book movie role. In rare cases, they’re sacked spectacularly for being rubbish, while in others they turn down the chance to return (because they’re idiots who want to star in a Queen Latifah movie). And some simply stop getting calls from their former employers.

In every case we’re supposed to go about our business without acknowledging the change, as if a character once
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

Celebrating bad artwork on DVD reissues

When a DVD gets a reissue, its distributor tends to change the artwork. Er, not always for the better...

Movie studios love having large catalogues of older movies. They guarantee a revenue stream after all, through TV sales, streaming services, and the occasional repackaging of a DVD and/or Blu-ray edition.

But new packaging means new artwork, and a star who was hot when the film first came around may have faded since. Plus, audience trends change. Plus, there's the added bonus of luring people to buy two copies. Marvellous!

Most of the time, artwork updates go without a hitch. But in recent times, particularly with 90s movies we've noticed, some of the updates, er, 'dumb things down' slightly. Most of these exhibits are from the UK, we should note. If we broadened it more than we had into the Us - which we may do in a future piece
See full article at Den of Geek »

Sequels abandoned after the film before them struggled

From Green Lantern 2 and Terminator: Salvation 2, to a Cat In The Hat sequel and Batman Triumphant: sequels killed by the earlier film...

Earlier this year, it was revealed that a sequel was in the early stages for the new Pierce Brosnan action thriller, The November Man. Remember it? Probably not: The November Man would go on to flop in the Us, grossing just $25m in the Us, and when it finally made it to British cinemas, it was released on just one screen (presumably to fill a contractual obligation somewhere along the line).

There's been no word yet on the fate of The November Man 2, but the outlook does not seem favourable. It wouldn't be the first time though that a sequel had been loudly mooted before even a first film was released, only to be quietly abandoned when something - usually related to box office takings - didn't go to plan.
See full article at Den of Geek »

The Callow Way – Not Another Superhero Movie

Neil Calloway looks at the superhero movie genre’s dominance of the mainstream, and its impact on adult cinema…

The news that financing on the the film Idol’s Eye, slated to star Robert De Niro and Robert Pattinson, had been pulled, just as it was about to go into production surprised me. If a film starring an double Oscar winner like De Niro and a young star like Pattinson can’t attract investors, what films can? Anyone that has an interest in film can’t have helped but notice that Marvel Studios – which only started making films on its own in 2008 – revealed their “phase three” for the next few years, quickly following the announcement from DC comics If these young upstarts can tell us what films they’re going to be making for the foreseeable future, how can a film like Idol’s Eye not secure the money it needs to get made?
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Schmuacher Talks "Batman & Robin" Regrets

Joel Schumacher attended the Hamptons International Film Festival this weekend where he accepted an award for his lifetime of work including acclaimed or beloved films like "The Lost Boys," "Falling Down," " The Client," "St. Elmo's Fire," and "A Time to Kill".

Yet conversation often drifts back towards his two Batman films - 1995's highly successful but critically mixed "Batman Forever," and 1997's infamous "Batman and Robin" which famously tanked the franchise for nearly a decade. In an interview with Variety at the event, he reflected on both projects.

It seems the darkness of Tim Burton's "Batman Returns" played a big part in the change of tone in the two Schumacher films:

"I was never able to go into the darkness. Because of "Batman Returns," families had objected that it was too adult, which is no criticism of Tim Burton's. When they offered it to me, I went to Tim and said,
See full article at Dark Horizons »

Director Joel Schumacher Reminisces About His Batman Films

Alright, everyone! Chill! Today, the Hamptons International Film Festival bestowed Joel Schumacher with their Golden Starfish Lifetime Achievement in Directing Award. Some of his highlights include: St. Elmo’s Fire, The Lost Boys, Falling Down, The Client, A Time to Kill, 8Mm and two episodes of Netflix's House of Cards. Even with a fairly impressive filmography Joel Schumacher tends to field questions pertaining to his two Caped Crusader films, Batman Forever (1995) and Batman & Robin (1997). A writer from Variety took this opportunity to chat with Joel about those two films, and this is what he had to say on the matter. Variety: Your “Batman” movies aren’t as dark as Christopher Nolan’s. Joel Schumacher: I was never able to go into the darkness. Because of “Batman Returns,” families had objected that it was too adult, which is no criticism of Tim Burton’s. When they offered it to me,
See full article at ComicBookMovie »
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