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John Morris, ‘Blazing Saddles’ and ‘Young Frankenstein’ Composer, Dies at 91

John Morris, ‘Blazing Saddles’ and ‘Young Frankenstein’ Composer, Dies at 91
John Morris, Oscar-nominated, Emmy-winning composer for many of the classic Mel Brooks comedies including “Blazing Saddles” and “Young Frankenstein,” died Thursday at his home in Red Hook, N.Y. He was 91.

Morris was Oscar-nominated for co-writing, with Brooks, the title song for “Blazing Saddles” – a sendup of classic movie cowboy tunes sung by Frankie Laine for the opening of Brooks’ 1974 film. Morris was nominated again in 1980 for his dramatic score for the Brooks-produced “The Elephant Man.”

Morris served as Brooks’ composer beginning with “The Producers” in 1967; he wrote the original arrangement for Brooks’ famous “Springtime for Hitler” song, and composed the rest of the underscore.

Morris’ most famous score is undoubtedly “Young Frankenstein,” for which he composed a memorable violin theme that plays a key role in the story. Under the title “Transylvanian Lullaby,” it has even been performed by top classical artists from violinist Gil Shaham to the Chicago Symphony Orchestra.

The composer
See full article at Variety - Film News »

All-time classic Gone with the Wind is back in Cineplex theatres as part of the Classic Film Series!

  • Cineplex
All-time classic Gone with the Wind is back in Cineplex theatres as part of the Classic Film Series!All-time classic Gone with the Wind is back in Cineplex theatres as part of the Classic Film Series!Ingrid Randoja - Cineplex Magazine9/13/2017 1:03:00 Pm

It took three directors, seven writers, 1,500 extras and one obsessed producer named David O. Selznick to make the 1939 classic Gone with the Wind.

Selznick bought the rights to author Margaret Mitchell’s 1,037-page epic Civil War romance that finds spoiled Southern belle Scarlett O’Hara (Vivien Leigh) pining for the melancholy Ashley (Leslie Howard) while falling into a tempestuous relationship with the arrogant Rhett Butler (Clark Gable).

Selznick wanted only Gable for the role and waited two years until he became available. However, finding the perfect Scarlett was a chore as he screen-tested 33 actors before signing Leigh, a relatively unknown British beauty. He hired screenwriters only to fire them,
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Memphis Theater Cancels Annual Screening of Gone With the Wind for Being 'Racially Insensitive'

Memphis Theater Cancels Annual Screening of Gone With the Wind for Being 'Racially Insensitive'
Gone With the Wind is now gone from a Memphis, Tennessee, movie theater where it was annually screened for the past 34 years — and fans have mixed feelings about it.

The 1939 film adaptation of Margaret Mitchell’s novel of the same name — which tells the story of plantation Southern belle Scarlett O’Hara (Vivien Leigh)’s love affair with Confederate soldier Rhett Butler (Clark Gable) during the Civil War and Reconstruction periods — has been pulled from The Orpheum Theatre’s 2018 summer movie series.

Though it had been a part of The Orpheum’s annual summer movie series for years, complaints from an Aug.
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The Best Picture Oscar winners that had sequels




More Best Picture Oscar winners have had sequels than you may think. This lot, in fact...

There’s still an element of snobbery where sequels to certain films is concerned. Whereas it’s now almost compulsory to greenlight a blockbuster with a view of a franchise in mind, it’s hard to think of most Best Picture Oscar winners being made with a follow-up in mind. Yet in perhaps a surprising number of cases, a sequel – or in the case of Rocky, lots of sequels – have followed.

These cases, in fact…

All Quiet On The Western Front (1930)

Followed by: The Road Back

Don’t be fooled into thinking sequels for prestigious movies are a relatively new phenomenon. Lewis Milestone’s 1930 war epic All Quiet On The Western Front, and its brutal account of World War I, is still regarded as something of a classic. A solid box office success,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Ken Burns’ The Civil War

Ken Burns and Co. made a big splash with this historical docu miniseries that in 1990 gripped the imagination of the whole country. Eleven hours of history are a breeze when presented in what was then a new form: authentic photos and paintings accompanied by actorly recitals of letters and documents from the era. It all comes to life. The people enduring the War Between the States seem just like us, as if it all happened yesterday. The Civil War DVD PBS Video 1990 / Color + B&W / 1:33 flat / 11 hours, 20 min. / 25th Anniversary Edition / Street Date October 13, 2015 / 99.99 Starring Shelby Foote, Ed Bearss, Barbara Fields, James Symington, Stephen B. Oates, William Safire, Daisy Turner and the voices of Sam Waterston, Julie Harris, Jason Robards, Morgan Freeman, Paul Roebling, Garrison Keillor, David McCullough (narrator), Arthur Miller, Charles McDowell, Horton Foote, George Plimpton, Philip Bosco, Jody Powell, Studs Terkel, Jeremy Irons, Derek Jacobi, Kurt Vonnegut Jr.,
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Fiery Red-Head Hayward Is TCM's Star of the Month

Susan Hayward. Susan Hayward movies: TCM Star of the Month Fiery redhead Susan Hayward it Turner Classic Movies' Star of the Month in Sept. 2015. The five-time Best Actress Oscar nominee – like Ida Lupino, a would-be Bette Davis that only sporadically landed roles to match the verve of her thespian prowess – was initially a minor Warner Bros. contract player who went on to become a Paramount second lead in the early '40s, a Universal leading lady in the late '40s, and a 20th Century Fox star in the early '50s. TCM will be presenting only three Susan Hayward premieres, all from her Fox era. Unfortunately, her Paramount and Universal work – e.g., Among the Living, Sis Hopkins, And Now Tomorrow, The Saxon Charm – which remains mostly unavailable (in quality prints), will remain unavailable this month. Highlights of the evening include: Adam Had Four Sons (1941), a sentimental but surprisingly
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Leigh Day on TCM: From Southern Belle in 'Controversial' Epic to Rape Victim in Code-Buster

Vivien Leigh ca. late 1940s. Vivien Leigh movies: now controversial 'Gone with the Wind,' little-seen '21 Days Together' on TCM Vivien Leigh is Turner Classic Movies' star today, Aug. 18, '15, as TCM's “Summer Under the Stars” series continues. Mostly a stage actress, Leigh was seen in only 19 films – in about 15 of which as a leading lady or star – in a movie career spanning three decades. Good for the relatively few who saw her on stage; bad for all those who have access to only a few performances of one of the most remarkable acting talents of the 20th century. This evening, TCM is showing three Vivien Leigh movies: Gone with the Wind (1939), 21 Days Together (1940), and A Streetcar Named Desire (1951). Leigh won Best Actress Academy Awards for the first and the third title. The little-remembered film in-between is a TCM premiere. 'Gone with the Wind' Seemingly all
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Warner Home Entertainment Announces "The Golden Year Collection" Blu-ray Set

  • CinemaRetro
Cinema Retro has received the following press release:

Revisit 1939, Hollywood’s Greatest Year, with 4 New Blu-ray™ Debuts

The Golden Year Collection June 9

Features Newly Restored Blu-ray Debut of The Hunchback of Notre Dame, Starring Charles Laughton, and Blu-ray Debuts of – Bette DavisDark Victory, Errol Flynn’s Dodge City and Greta Garbo’s Ninotchka. Collection also includes Gone With the Wind.

Burbank, Calif. March 10, 2015 – On June 9, Warner Bros. Home Entertainment will celebrate one of the most prolific twelve months in Hollywood’s history with the 6-disc The Golden Year Collection. Leading the five-film set will be the Blu-ray debut of

The Hunchback of Notre Dame, in a new restoration which will have its world premiere at TCM’s Classic Film Festival beginning March 26 in Los Angeles. Charles Laughton and Maureen O’Hara star in Victor Hugo’s tragic tale which William Dieterle directed.

The other films featured in the Wbhe
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New Photos From Disney’s Tomorrowland, Avengers: Age Of Ultron & Steven Spielberg’s Untitled Cold War Spy Thriller

Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures has released a lineup, along with new photos and dates, of their upcoming movies for 2015.

From dinosaurs to fairy tales, super heroes to galaxies far, far away, one of the most anticipated films next year is from director Steven Spielberg.

©DreamWorks II Distribution Co., LLC and Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

Tom Hanks (left) stars in Spielberg’s (right) Untitled Cold War spy thriller, which is the true story of James Donovan, an attorney who finds himself thrust into the center of the Cold War when the CIA sends him on the near-impossible mission to negotiate the release of a captured American U-2 pilot.

“This is one of the more astonishing stories about the Cold War I’d ever heard. James Donovan is a hero to me and Tom made him so completely accessible. I’ve always wanted to make a spy
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'Gone With the Wind' Facts: 25 Things You Never Knew About the Most Popular Movie Ever Made

Seventy-five years after the premiere of "Gone With the Wind" (on December 15, 1939), it seems that nothing -- not the passage of time, not the movie's controversial racial politics, not the film's daunting length, and not even the release of certain James Cameron global blockbusters -- can diminish the romantic Civil War drama's stature as the most popular movie of all time.

The film is certainly a formidable artistic achievement, a cornerstone of movie history, and a highlight of a year so full of landmark films that 1939 has often been called the greatest year in the history of Hollywood filmmaking. Each viewing of the four-hour epic seems to reveal new details. Still, even longtime "Gwtw" fans may not know the behind-the-scenes story of the film, one as lengthy and tumultuous as the on-screen romance between Scarlett O'Hara (Vivien Leigh) and Rhett Butler (Clark Gable). Producer David O. Selznick spent fortunes, hired
See full article at Moviefone »

Frankly, Scarlett: 10 things you might not know about Gone With The Wind

  • Cineplex
It was the first color film to win the Best Picture Oscar and is ranked as one of the greatest movie of all time by the American Film Institute. In its first four years of release the film sold 59.5 million tickets, a number equal to half the population of the United States in 1939 and according to Box Office Mojo it’s the highest grossing film of all time when adjusted for ticket price inflation.

Today, Gone with the Wind celebrates its seventy-fifth anniversary as “the most iconic film of all time.”

Set against the backdrop of the American Civil War, the story of Southern Belle Scarlett O’Hara and her torrid affair with blockade runner Rhett Butler remains so popular it has motivated legions of fans, called Windies, to gather in period costume in author Margaret Mitchell’s hometown of Atlanta, Georgia.

It even inspired one of the most famous television parodies of all time.
See full article at Cineplex »

The 50 Definitive Relationship Dramas: 20-11

20. Love/Chloe in the Afternoon (1972)

Directed by: Éric Rohmer

Originally titled “Love in the Afternoon,” but released in North America as “Chloe in the Afternoon,” this Rohmer film is a tale of possible infidelity, seen through the eyes of a conflicted man. Frédéric (Bernard Verley) is a successful young lawyer who is happily married to a teacher named Hélène (Françoise Verley), who is pregnant with their second child. While Frédéric is in a considerably good place in his life, he still struggles with the loss of excitement he had before he married, when he could sleep with whomever he chose. It wasn’t so much the sex that thrilled him, but the chase itself. Still, he feels that these thoughts and fantasies, paired with his refusal to act upon them, only proves that he is completely dedicated and in love with his own wife. That is, until he meets Chloé
See full article at SoundOnSight »

TCM to Celebrate 75th Anniversary of Gone With The Wind In September

This fall, Turner Classic Movies is teaming up with Warner Bros. Home Entertainment, Fathom Events and the Harry Ransom Center at The University of Texas at Austin to celebrate the 75th anniversary of one of the most successful and beloved films of all time: the 1939 classic Gone With the Wind. The multi-tiered celebration is set to include a new Blu-ray collection of the movie, screenings at more than 650 movie theaters nationwide, a fascinating exhibit and book on the making of the film and, of course, a special presentation of the movie on Turner Classic Movies.

“TCM’s wide-ranging celebration of Gone With the Wind is a great chance for fans to experience and explore this monumental classic in a variety of ways,” said Dennis Adamovich, senior vice president of digital, affiliate, lifestyle and enterprise commerce for TCM, TBS and TNT.“We’re very excited to be working with our friends at Warner Bros.
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Robert Halmi Sr.: A Gulliver Among TV Movie Producers

Robert Halmi Sr.: A Gulliver Among TV Movie Producers
Robert Halmi Sr. – who has died at the age of 90 – would never tell you how he financed his larger-than-life TV projects. Coyly, he would reference international sales, even though others who dealt in the same arena insisted the numbers simply didn’t add up.

In a way, though, that was also part of Halmi’s charm. The consummate showman, the producer never wanted to be bothered with the business details, as if to say, in that thick Hungarian accent, “Hey, we’re doing a huge miniseries about the Bible! Why are you worrying about how I’m going to pay for it?”

For a time, Halmi cast an enormous shadow over the TV landscape. In the 1990s, he provided NBC with a stream of sweeping epics – “Gulliver’s Travels,” “The Odyssey,” “Merlin,” “Noah’s Ark” – that drew blockbuster ratings. He brought the “Gone With the Wind” sequel “Scarlett” to CBS,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Lip Service: The Top 10 Movie Catchphrases

The obligatory movie catchphrase…memorable golden dialogue for the cinematic soul. What film fan does not enjoy reciting and repeating their favorite movie quotes? After all, there are countless catchphrases in films–some are famous, some are familiar, some are obscure. Still, paraphrasing movie quips has become an art onto itself?

So what are your all-time movie catchphrases? Perhaps it is Jimmy Cagney’s “You dirt rat…you killed my brother?”. Maybe it is Cary Grant’s “Judy, Judy, Judy”? Or how about Lauren Bacall’s “You know how to whistle, don’t you? Just blow…” Whatever movie catchphrases catches your fancy is fine so long as it brings up memories of the film or film characters tat have made a big impression on your cinema experiences.

The Lip Service: The Top 10 Movie Catchphrases selections are: (in alphabetical order according to film title):

1.) “Fasten your seat belts, it
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Blu-ray: Gone With the Wind 75th Anniversary

Blu-ray Release Date: Sept 30, 2014

Price: Blu-ray $49.99

Studio: Warner Home Video

Classic romance drama Gone With the Wind — perhaps The classic romance drama film — turns 75 and is celebrated with another Ultimate Collector’s Edition, but the set does have some new features.

Limited and numbered with new memorabilia, packaging and special features, the Gone With the Wind 75th Anniversary Ultimate Collector’s Edition Blu-ray set includes a replicaof Rhett Butler’s handkerchief and a music box paperweight playing Tara’s theme with an image on top of the Rhett-Scarlett kiss.

Also included is a 36-page companion booklet featuring a look at the timeless style of the film, written by New York fashion designer and Project Runway finalist Austin Scarlett, whose signature look reflects the romantic elegance of the Gone With the Wind era.

The new special features on the Blu-ray disc are:

footage of Clark Gable (It Happened One Night
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Following Anderson's Death, Only Two Gwtw Performers Still Living

Gone with the Wind’ actress Mary Anderson dead at 96; also featured in Alfred Hitchcock thriller ‘LifeboatMary Anderson, an actress featured in both Gone with the Wind and Alfred Hitchcock’s adventure thriller Lifeboat, died following a series of small strokes on Sunday, April 6, 2014, while under hospice care in Toluca Lake/Burbank, northwest of downtown Los Angeles. Anderson, the widow of multiple Oscar-winning cinematographer Leon Shamroy, had turned 96 on April 3. Born in Birmingham, Alabama, in 1918, Mary Anderson was reportedly discovered by director George Cukor, at the time looking for an actress to play Scarlett O’Hara in David O. Selznick’s film version of Margaret Mitchell’s bestseller Gone with the Wind. Instead of Scarlett, eventually played by Vivien Leigh, Anderson was cast in the small role of Maybelle Merriwether — most of which reportedly ended up on the cutting-room floor. Cukor was later fired from the project; his replacement, Victor Fleming,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

'Gone With the Wind' Is Getting a Prequel (Novel)

It's the highest-grossing movie of all time, and now "Gone With the Wind" is getting a prequel -- in book form, anyway.

The New York Times reports that a new novel, called "Ruth's Journey," will debut in later this year and tell the story of "Wind"'s Mammy character, played by Oscar winner Hattie McDaniel in the 1939 film adaptation of Margaret Mitchell's 1936 book. Mammy was the slave owned by Scarlett O'Hara's family, known for her loyalty and her quick wit.

Author Daniel McCaig, who wrote "Ruth," told the Times that there are "three major characters in 'Gone With the Wind,' but we only think about two of them."

"Scarlett and Rhett are familiars, but when it comes to the third, we don't know where she was born, if she was ever married, if she ever had children," McCaig said. "Indeed, we don't even know her name."

The prequel,
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Gone with the Wind trail: the top 10 sights in Atlanta

Atlanta does give a damn about Gone with the Wind – and you can take in the museums, southern homes and hotels that are connected to Margaret Mitchell's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel and the film, which celebrates its 75th birthday this year

Margaret Mitchell House

The first port of call for Gone With The Wind fans, thanks to its central location in midtown, the ground floor of this redbrick house is a museum that includes the apartment where Margaret Mitchell wrote most of her novel. Mitchell and her second husband, John Marsh, occupied one of 10 apartments crammed into the Tudor-revival building she nicknamed The Dump. The apartment's two small rooms plus a galley kitchen and bathroom look much as they would have when Mitchell lived there between 1925 and 1932. Further rooms have displays of photographs of Mitchell and there is a half-hourly guided tour, which talks you through her childhood and how
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Why are the Oscars embracing 'Oz' but not 'Gone With the Wind'?

Why are the Oscars embracing 'Oz' but not 'Gone With the Wind'?
Yesterday’s announcement by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences that the The Wizard of Oz will be celebrated at this year’s Oscars was met with widespread enthusiasm. After all, it’s one of Hollywood’s most beloved films, multiple generations have grown up singing its tunes, and it’s celebrating its 75th anniversary.

But The Wizard of Oz wasn’t the only classic movie to come out in 1939. That prolific Hollywood year also boasted Frank Capra’s Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, John Ford’s Stagecoach, Goodbye, Mr. Chips, Ninotchka (“Garbo laughs!”), Gunga Din, William Wyler
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