The Old Curiosity Shop (1995) - News Poster

(1995 TV Movie)

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Today in Movie Culture: Andy Serkis Recaps the History of Motion Capture, a 'Silence of the Lambs' Parody and More

  • Movies.com
Here are a bunch of little bites to satisfy your hunger for movie culture:   Film History Lesson of the Day: For Wired, Andy Serkis breaks down the history of motion capture performance, of which he's the master:   Movie Parody of the Day: One of the iconic scenes from The Silence of the Lambs gets an extension in this parody from Cracked:   Movie Comparison of the Day: With Jigsaw out this week, Couch Tomato shows 24 reasons the original Saw is basically a remake of Se7en:   Alternate Movie Poster of the Day: This isn't just a great Gremlins poster by Kevin M. Wilson, but it's also a fun game for movie geeks:  The Old Curiosity Shop. There are 84 different references in...

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Dickensian review – a labour of love obscured by too much fog and too many hats

This 20-part drama looks beautiful but the idea, of taking Dickens characters out of their novels and finding something new for them to do, is mystifying. Plus, Agatha Christie’s And Then There Were None

Christmas Eve, and old Mr Havisham is dead. His daughter, Amelia (Miss Havisham) and her half-brother Arthur are doing the stuff people do when a parent dies – mourning, funerals, wills etc, the last of which doesn’t go well for Arthur, inheritance-wise. Ebenezer Scrooge and Jacob Marley (not dead – not yet), the Wonga of their day, are entering into the spirit of the season of goodwill by pursuing debts, even from the old fella at The Old Curiosity Shop whose granddaughter Nell is dying. Though later Nell, watched over by Mrs Gamp, doesn’t die. The poor – Bob and his Cratchit family etc – prepare for a wretched Christmas in bleak but cheerful poverty. An urchin
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Boxing Day's best TV: Dickensian; Peter & Wendy; The Big Fat Quiz Of The Year 2015

  • The Guardian - TV News
Tony Jordan has fun with a cast of Dickens’s characters; ITV’s Peter Pan adaptation is full of bite; and Jimmy Carr and chums cock a snook at 2015

Tony Jordan has big fun with a cast of Charles Dickens characters from Oliver Twist to The Old Curiosity Shop. Inspired by the novelist’s tales of the haves and have-nots in Victorian society, this series is released in half-hour chunks of the next few weeks, just as Dickens ought to be. Jacob Marley sends a missive to Fagin while Jaggers settles the affairs of a brother and sister who’ve just buried their father. The Cratchetts try to scrape enough together for a cheerful Christmas while Nancy acquires a new client, much to Bill’s chagrin. Julia Raeside

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Frank Thornton obituary

Actor best known as the haughty department store supervisor Captain Peacock in the TV comedy Are You Being Served?

The actor Frank Thornton, who has died aged 92, had a flair for comedy derived from the subtle craftsmanship of classical stage work. However, he will be best remembered for his longstanding characters in two popular BBC television comedy series – the sniffily priggish Captain Peacock in Are You Being Served? and the pompous retired policeman Herbert "Truly" Truelove, in Roy Clarke's Last of the Summer Wine.

Robertson Hare, the great Whitehall farceur, told him: "You'll never do any good until you're 40." And, said Thornton, "he was quite right." In the event, he was 51 when David Croft, producer of another long-running British staple, Dad's Army, remembered the tall, long-faced actor from another engagement and decided to cast him as the dapper floor-walker in charge of shop assistants played by Mollie Sugden, Wendy Richard,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Frank Thornton obituary

Actor best known as the haughty department store supervisor Captain Peacock in the TV comedy Are You Being Served?

The actor Frank Thornton, who has died aged 92, had a flair for comedy derived from the subtle craftsmanship of classical stage work. However, he will be best remembered for his longstanding characters in two popular BBC television comedy series – the sniffily priggish Captain Peacock in Are You Being Served? and the pompous retired policeman Herbert "Truly" Truelove, in Roy Clarke's Last of the Summer Wine.

Robertson Hare, the great Whitehall farceur, told him: "You'll never do any good until you're 40." And, said Thornton, "he was quite right." In the event, he was 51 when David Croft, producer of another long-running British staple, Dad's Army, remembered the tall, long-faced actor from another engagement and decided to cast him as the dapper floor-walker in charge of shop assistants played by Mollie Sugden, Wendy Richard,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Win The Old Curiosity Shop on DVD

To mark the release of classic movie based on the Charles Dickens novel The Old Curiosity Shop on DVD 14th May, we’ve been given three copies to give away. The film adaptation is directed by Thomas Bentley and stars Hay Petrie, Ben Webster and Elaine Benson.

Hay Petrie ingests the scenery as the demonic, hunchbacked Mr. Quilp in this 1935 British adaptation of Dickens’ The Old Curiosity Shop. Quilp is the wicked landlord who dominates and later ruins the lives of shopkeeper Trent (Ben Webster) and his resourceful granddaughter Little Nell (Elaine Benson). The death of the heroine, which created quite a brouhaha when the book was first published, is here handled with discretion and taste. Scenarists Margaret Kennedy and Ralph Neale successfully tackle the challenge of whittling Dickens’ massive novel into a playable 90 minutes. The Old Curiosity Shop would be remade three times, once as a musical with Anthony Newley as Quilp.
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La Grande Illusion and its journey to safety

Dr. Garth Twa takes an in-depth look at La Grande Illusion - a revolutionary milestone of visual art, exclusively for @puremovies We all have those films, those films that open us up. La Grand Illusion is one of those films. It was for Orson Welles, and for Woody Allen. That’s what so important about what Studiocanal is doing. ‘With every foot of film lost, we lose a link to our culture, to the world around us, to each other, and to ourselves,’ Martin Scorsese says, 'movies touch our hearts, and awaken our vision, and change the way we see things. They take us to other places. They open doors and minds. Movies are the memories of our lifetime. We need to keep them alive.' In addition to restoring and re-releasing La Grand Illusion, this year Studiocanal are also bringing out Marcel Carné’s Quai des Brumes, Luis Bunuel
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"Dickens on Screen"

  • MUBI
Charles Dickens won't officially turn 200 until February 7, but the Dickens 2012 extravaganza — festivals, theater, exhibitions, readings and so on — is well underway. And today, the BFI series Dickens on Screen opens at BFI Southbank in London for a run that'll last through February.

"No other novelist has been adapted for the screen so often or to such popular acclaim. Around 400 films and TV series have been made so far," writes Robert Douglas-Fairhurst in the Guardian. "In a famous essay published in 1944, the Soviet director Sergei Eisenstein argued that 'only very thoughtless and presumptuous people' believed in 'some incredible virgin birth' of cinema, and that the film pioneer Dw Griffith found many of his storytelling tricks, including close-ups, dissolves and cutting between parallel narratives, in novels such as Oliver Twist. Griffith admitted as much himself. One of his first films was a 14-minute version of Dickens's The Cricket on the Hearth (1909) that
See full article at MUBI »

TV review: The Crimson Petal and the White and If Walls Could Talk

When Sugar threw herself down the stairs it would have needed a heart of stone not to laugh

It's a long time since Oscar Wilde laughed at the death of Little Nell in Dickens' The Old Curiosity Shop. Only seconds since I stopped giggling at The Crimson Petal and the White (BBC2).

There's probably a law that says critics mustn't laugh at a 19th century ex-sex worker hurling herself downstairs to end a pregnancy brought about by the conflicted heir of a perfume business, but I couldn't help myself. Even though last night's denouement was ostensibly a (serious face) critique of Victorian gender politics and class stratification – oh I can't keep it up. It was too silly.

Romola Garai as Sugar sucked in her cheeks to accentuate that proto-heroin chic look, pouted lovely lips (does Rimmel do a lipstick called Consumptive Goth?) and hovered at the top of the stairs
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

The Wire re-up: season five, episode eight – the Dickensian aspects

Spoiler Alert: This weekly blog is for those who have already seen the show in its entirety. This week: what does The Wire have in common with Charles Dickens?

The Wire: the book

The Wire Re-up: The Guardian Guide to the Greatest TV Show Ever Made is out now from Guardian Books, and available in all good bookshops. The book features blogposts on every episode from all five seasons, plus interviews with the cast and features on the show – as well as many, many of your comments, which have made this blog the great forum it is. Buy the book by clicking here.

Season five, episode eight

Is The Wire Dickensian? David Simon dislikes the comparison. In this recent Vice magazine interview he admits a similarity in the "scope of society through the classes" covered by The Wire and Charles Dickens, but says he feels his treatment of the
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

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