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Gargoyles (TV Series 1994–1996) Poster

(1994–1996)

Trivia

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Unlike other cartoons on television during the time, this is the only one that follows a continuing storyline and features references to events in past episodes.
Was Disney's most popular cartoon show. Perhaps more than any other Disney production, the series has inspired an intense fan following. Disney acknowledged this with their selection of the show as their first animated series released for DVD retail in a season collection format. In 1997 there began an annual fan convention known as The Gathering of the Gargoyles. Fans shared costumes, fan-fiction and even had discussions to further develop the overall anatomy of the Gargoyle characters. The convention was officially discontinued in 2009.
Many characters on the show were voiced by actors who were regular cast members of the various "Star Trek" series. These include Jonathan Frakes, Marina Sirtis, Nichelle Nichols, Avery Brooks, Colm Meaney, Michael Dorn, Kate Mulgrew, Brent Spiner, LeVar Burton, Paul Winfield, and David Warner The producers considered asking Frakes and Sirtis to personally appeal to Patrick Stewart to perform a voice for scale, but decided it was an unfair request.
Disney's first animated drama series.
According to creator Greg Weisman, the character of Lexington would have eventually realized that he is, in fact, homosexual. Weisman admits, however, that this is unlikely to have ever been overtly acknowledged as the idea of sexuality within a Disney animated property may have been considered "inappropriate". However, in the official comic book continuation published by Slave Labor Graphics, Weisman has enjoyed some more leeway on this matter.
References many William Shakespeare plays with its character names: Queen Titania, King Oberon, and Puck from "A Midsummer Night's Dream", Ophelia from "Hamlet", Princess Katherine from "Henry V", and the title character from "Macbeth". In addition, the relationship of the various personalities of Coldstone mirrors the central characters of "Othello" and are named as such in the scripts. However, MacBeth's backstory in "City of Stone" is based more on the history of the actual King MacBeth of Scotland.
Many of the characters' names are very symbolic. For example: Fox's parents' last name is Reynard, as in 'Reynard the Fox'. Most obvious, however, are probably the show's main character and villain: Goliath and David Xanatos, as in 'David and Goliath'.
The show was originally pitched as a comedy series. The basic premise remained the same: approximately one-thousand years ago, Gargoyles were not merely stone statues, but real flesh and blood creatures. But unlike the noble protectors of the final shows, these Gargoyles were mischievous troublemakers who frequently drove the local humans nuts. This development went through several versions before being scrapped in favor of the now darker and more serious tone of the show.
Elisa's last name was originally Chavez. When Salli Richardson-Whitfield was cast as Elisa, her ethnicity was changed from Latina to African-American and Native American. (Chavez was used as the police captain's name.) "Maza" is a Sioux word meaning "iron".
Jonathan Frakes' wife was pregnant with their child at the same time as his character's wife Fox was in the series.
Originally David's last name was Xavier but Greg Weisman worried that he would be associated with the Marvel Comics hero Charles Xavier/Professer X, who was then appearing in the animated X-Men (1992) series. He took most of the name Xanatos from the Greek deity of death Thanatos, but kept a similar sound to Xavier in it with the first initial. The character was also originally going to be the descendant of the wizard who froze the Gargoyles in their stone forms. (Wolf was eventually the character who was an enemy descended from an enemy of the past, Hakon.)
A bi-monthly comic series from Slave Labour Comics continued the story from directly after the last episode, Gargoyles: Hunter's Moon: Part 3 (1996), ignoring Gargoyles: The Goliath Chronicles (1996). The comic series ran 8 issues, and had one spin-off: "Bad Guys". Issues 9-12 of the comic are contained in the second volume trade paper back. There are three trade paperbacks: "Gargoyles: Clan Building Vol. 1 and Vol. 2" as well as "Gargoyles: Bad Guys", totaling some 18 issues. The controversial "Goliath Chronicles" season aired on Disney's One Saturday Morning format on ABC. Except for the pilot of the series, Gargoyles: The Goliath Chronicles: The Journey (1996), these episodes were produced without the involvement of series creator Greg Weisman, and are largely not considered canonical by fans as well as Weisman, who has only seen each episode once and refuses to view them again.
Greg Weisman used Odysseus, a human but with a remarkable ability to trick others, as an inspiration to Xanatos, especially after he was established as being of Greek descent.
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Spoilers 

The trivia item below may give away important plot points.

As of 2011, this is the only Disney animated property to feature nearly all of their main characters being killed in one form or another. Granted, nearly all of the main characters are alive and well by the show's end; but no other Disney cartoon series has featured so many characters dying even if it was just a "dream sequence" or "alternate reality".

See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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