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TV Animators Tooned Up for Big Screen Features

TV Animators Tooned Up for Big Screen Features
The creative lines between film and television are blurring ever more frequently these days, with many live-action directors, writers and other talent moving with increasing ease between the two media. But in the animation industry, only a handful of directors and writers have made the transition.

One of those is Rich Moore, who is directing Disney’s “Ralph Breaks the Internet: Wreck-It Ralph 2” alongside Phil Johnston and who earlier this year won the animated feature Oscar for Disney’s 2016 hit “Zootopia” with director Byron Howard. Moore has an extensive background in TV animation, working on “The Simpsons,” “The Critic” and “Futurama” for many years before making his feature directing debut on the first “Wreck-It Ralph” film in 2012.

Moore himself realizes he’s part of a rare breed.

“I’ve noticed that, too, and it’s a shame because there are some amazing TV directors out there who should be making features,” says Moore. “If
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Longtime Voice Actress Russi Taylor on Playing Minnie Mouse and Falling for Mickey in Real Life

Longtime Voice Actress Russi Taylor on Playing Minnie Mouse and Falling for Mickey in Real Life
You may not recognize her walking down the street, but Russi Taylor plays one of the most famous characters in the world.

Taylor has been the voice of Minnie Mouse for more than 30 years, and that’s just a fraction of voice work she’s done in her long career. She’s played Huey, Dewey, and Louie in various Disney projects, Pebbles Flintstone in “The Flintstone Comedy Show,” Pac-Baby in the “Pac-Man” TV series, “Penny Tompkins” in “The Critic,” Baby Gonzo in “Muppet Babies,” and various characters over 17 years on “The Simpsons,” among too many others to count.

She’s currently working on Disney Television Animation’s new series “Mickey and the Roadster Racers,” which brings together all of Disney’s classic characters: Mickey, Minnie, Goofy, Donald Duck, Daisy Duck, and Pluto. In “Racers,” Minnie and Daisy exemplify female empowerment as they run a business called Happy Helpers. It airs Fridays on the Disney Channel.

Taylor
See full article at Variety - TV News »

The Lrm Interview: Producer James L. Brooks on Making The Edge of Seventeen

Opening today is Kelly Fremon Craig’s directorial debut The Edge of Seventeen, and it is an impressive debut that works as a coming-of-age high school comedy in a way few others have

There’s a reason why it’s being compared to everything from Juno to Clueless to Fast Times at Ridgemont High, and much of that has to do with the central character, 17-year-old Nadine, as played by Hailee Steinfeld. She’s a bit of an outcast, sure, but the words that come out of her mouth, as written by Craig, makes her an immediately compelling character, as we see her face all sorts of adversity from the death of her father to other more mundane teenage angst with such a wry sense of humor.

Craig had a great mentor-of-sorts in James L. Brooks, who signed on as a producer fairly early on in order to get the movie made.
See full article at LRM Online »

James L. Brooks Selected for Norman Lear Award by Producers Guild

James L. Brooks Selected for Norman Lear Award by Producers Guild
The Producers Guild of America has selected longtime television and film producer James L. Brooks as the recipient of the 2017 Norman Lear Achievement Award in Television.

The award will be presented to Brooks at the 28th Annual Producers Guild Awards ceremony on Jan. 28 at the Beverly Hilton hotel.

Brooks has won 22 Emmys and is a three-time Academy Award winner. He was the creative force behind “The Simpsons,” “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” and “Taxi.” His most current project is “The Edge of Seventeen,” starring Hailee Steinfeld with a release this month.

Producers Guild Awards Chairs Donald De Line and Amy Pascal said, “For decades, Jim Brooks has brought memorable characters, big laughs and above all, a profound sense of humanity into our homes. Jim is a producer whose work has influenced multiple generations of storytellers, so it’s an incredible privilege to be able to honor him with our Guild’s Norman Lear Achievement Award.”

Shonda Rhimes
See full article at Variety - TV News »

James L. Brooks Selected for Norman Lear Award by Producers Guild

James L. Brooks Selected for Norman Lear Award by Producers Guild
The Producers Guild of America has selected longtime television and film producer James L. Brooks as the recipient of the 2017 Norman Lear Achievement Award in Television.

The award will be presented to Brooks at the 28th Annual Producers Guild Awards ceremony on Jan. 28 at the Beverly Hilton hotel.

Brooks has won 22 Emmys and is a three-time Academy Award winner. He was the creative force behind “The Simpsons,” “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” and “Taxi.” His most current project is “The Edge of Seventeen,” starring Hailee Steinfeld with a release this month.

Producers Guild Awards Chairs Donald De Line and Amy Pascal said, “For decades, Jim Brooks has brought memorable characters, big laughs and above all, a profound sense of humanity into our homes. Jim is a producer whose work has influenced multiple generations of storytellers, so it’s an incredible privilege to be able to honor him with our Guild’s Norman Lear Achievement Award.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Great Job, Internet!: Brad Bird offers a master class on what makes a great animated movie

Writer-director Brad Bird has established himself as one of the biggest names in the world of animation, starting with his work on TV shows like The Simpsons and The Critic before moving on to a string of acclaimed feature films like Ratatouille and The Incredibles. Along the way, unsurprisingly, he’s developed some pretty strong ideas about his chosen medium, and he’s not at all timid about sharing them.

Kees Van Dijkhuizen Jr., a film editor from the Netherlands, has compiled some of Bird’s opinions into an instructive video called “Insight: Brad Bird On Animation.” Here, audio from various Bird interviews has been layered over clips from his work, including those aforementioned Pixar triumphs and 1999’s The Iron Giant. Think of this as a five-minute master class on what makes a great animated movie, taught by an instructor who could not be more pumped for this.

Insight ...
See full article at The AV Club »

Exclusive: Will There Be Another Simpsons Movie? James L. Brooks on the Future of the Show

With a career in film and television that now dates back fifty years, the name James L. Brooks and his Gracie Films logo have become a comfortable thing to see whenever they appear. While it will actually grace the front of Kelly Fremon Craig’s upcoming teen comedy The Edge of Seventeen (and we’ll have more on that later), they’re both better known as the coda on Fox’s long-running animated series, The Simpsons.

Lrm had a chance to talk with Brooks about finding and producing Craig’s directorial debut, but we also asked about how things were going with The Simpsons. This is what he told us:

“I’m very involved, and it’s a particular exciting year for us. We’re doing our first hour special, and we did a small virtual reality thing—we’re the first television show to do that. That was labor-intensive,
See full article at LRM Online »

‘This Modern World by Tom Tomorrow’ To Be Adapted as An Animated Series

‘This Modern World by Tom Tomorrow’ To Be Adapted as An Animated Series
The animation studio Film Roman announced today it has acquired an option to adapt “This Modern World by Tom Tomorrow,” the long-running, award-winning comic strip written and inked by Dan Perkins, as an episodic animated series.

The comic strip has been carried by publications across the country for more than 25 years, appearing in the New York Times, The New Yorker, Spin, Esquire, and more.

Read More: ‘The Simpsons’ Teams with Google to Enter Virtual Reality for Its 600th Episode

“We are exceptionally pleased and excited to be working with Dan to adapt his fiercely insightful and hilarious strip for television or digital,” says Steve Waterman, CEO of Film Roman. “With its large and enthusiastic following, it’s a show that could work in a broadcast, cable or streaming environment, and we’re going to explore all of those options.”

The series will be executive produced by animator Phil Roman, founder of Film Roman,
See full article at Indiewire Television »

‘This Modern World by Tom Tomorrow’ To Be Adapted as An Animated Series

‘This Modern World by Tom Tomorrow’ To Be Adapted as An Animated Series
The animation studio Film Roman announced today it has acquired an option to adapt “This Modern World by Tom Tomorrow,” the long-running, award-winning comic strip written and inked by Dan Perkins, as an episodic animated series.

The comic strip has been carried by publications across the country for more than 25 years, appearing in the New York Times, The New Yorker, Spin, Esquire, and more.

Read More: ‘The Simpsons’ Teams with Google to Enter Virtual Reality for Its 600th Episode

“We are exceptionally pleased and excited to be working with Dan to adapt his fiercely insightful and hilarious strip for television or digital,” says Steve Waterman, CEO of Film Roman. “With its large and enthusiastic following, it’s a show that could work in a broadcast, cable or streaming environment, and we’re going to explore all of those options.”

The series will be executive produced by animator Phil Roman, founder of Film Roman,
See full article at Indiewire »

Interview: ‘The Simpsons’ Showrunner Al Jean on Amy Schumer, the Hourlong Episode, and More to Come in Season 28

Interview: ‘The Simpsons’ Showrunner Al Jean on Amy Schumer, the Hourlong Episode, and More to Come in Season 28
The Simpsons is entering its 28th year, yet I still have new questions every time I see showrunner Al Jean at the Fox Television Critics Association party. Jean has been the show runner for 26 of the 28 years. He took two years to do the short-lived animated series The Critic, and may be the […]

The post Interview: ‘The Simpsons’ Showrunner Al Jean on Amy Schumer, the Hourlong Episode, and More to Come in Season 28 appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

Watch: First Teaser For Judd Apatow’s Netflix Show ‘Love’ With Gillian Jacobs & Paul Rust

Watch: First Teaser For Judd Apatow’s Netflix Show ‘Love’ With Gillian Jacobs & Paul Rust
Judd Apatow made his name in television, working on “The Ben Stiller Show,” “The Larry Sanders Show,” "The Critic,” and co-creating “Freaks & Geeks” (which is a cultural touchstone now, though ignored at the time), and while “Undeclared” didn’t have the same impact, it still launched the careers of many young actors. Read More: Judd Apatow Produced 'Pee-Wee's Big Holiday' Headed To Netflix Since those TV days, Apatow has dived hard into world of movies in a big way, but he hasn’t forgotten either his TV or mentoring roots (he's an executive producer on the HBO hit "Girls," for example). And in February he's back on the small screen with his new Netflix show, “Love.” And while most of Apatow’s old crew, Seth Rogen, Jason Segel, James Franco, etc. have found their own way, producing, writing and starring in their own created movies, in his no-child-left-behind way,
See full article at Indiewire Television »

Watch: First Teaser For Judd Apatow’s Netflix Show ‘Love’ With Gillian Jacobs & Paul Rust

Judd Apatow made his name in television, working on “The Ben Stiller Show,” “The Larry Sanders Show,” "The Critic,” and co-creating “Freaks & Geeks” (which is a cultural touchstone now, though ignored at the time), and while “Undeclared” didn’t have the same impact, it still launched the careers of many young actors. Read More: Judd Apatow Produced 'Pee-Wee's Big Holiday' Headed To Netflix Since those TV days, Apatow has dived hard into world of movies in a big way, but he hasn’t forgotten either his TV or mentoring roots (he's an executive producer on the HBO hit "Girls," for example). And in February he's back on the small screen with his new Netflix show, “Love.” And while most of Apatow’s old crew, Seth Rogen, Jason Segel, James Franco, etc. have found their own way, producing, writing and starring in their own created movies, in his no-child-left-behind way,
See full article at The Playlist »

Exclusive Interview: ‘Simpsons’ Showrunner Al Jean on Harry Shearer’s Characters and 16 x 9 Cropping

Exclusive Interview: ‘Simpsons’ Showrunner Al Jean on Harry Shearer’s Characters and 16 x 9 Cropping
Al Jean may be the only other person alive who’s seen as many Simpsons episodes as I have. As showrunner for most of the series’ 27 plus year run, he only missed two years while he ran the short lived series The Critic, but still kept up with The Simpsons. I have literally never missed […]

The post Exclusive Interview: ‘Simpsons’ Showrunner Al Jean on Harry Shearer’s Characters and 16 x 9 Cropping appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

Judd Apatow on Hauling 24-Year-Old Simpsons Episode from 'Deep Storage'

Judd Apatow on Hauling 24-Year-Old Simpsons Episode from 'Deep Storage'
Writer-director Judd Apatow (Bridesmaids, Girls) can officially add “Simpsons scribe” to his IMDb page resumé this Sunday — and he owes it all to being a hoarder.

Sunday’s episode, in which Homer becomes Bart’s new best friend after being hypnotized into thinking he’s a 10-year-old boy, was written as a spec script by Apatow in 1990 during the show’s first season.

TVLine spoke with Apatow and Simpsons executive producer Al Jean about Sunday’s throwback episode (Sunday, 8/7c), its two-decade journey to the screen and whether it could mark the beginning of a beautiful writing partnership.

Tvline | Maybe I’m clueless,
See full article at TVLine.com »

Christine Cavanaugh Dies; Voiced Babe The Pig, Chuckie On ‘Rugrats’

  • Deadline
Christine Cavanaugh Dies; Voiced Babe The Pig, Chuckie On ‘Rugrats’
Christine Cavanaugh, an Annie Award-winning voice actor who brought to life such characters as Babe the Sheep Pig, Chuckie on Rugrats and the title kid in Dexter’s Laboratory, has died. She was 51. The Utah native died December 22, according to the Los Angeles Times; no cause of death was reported.

Cavanaugh started out as an actress in the late 1980s, appearing on such shows as Cheers and Empty Nest. In 1991 she landed a regular gig as the voice of Goslyn Mallard on Darkwing Duck, appearing in more than 70 episodes. Probably her most famous TV gig began that same year as she voiced Chuckie Finster, the scaredy-cat oldest baby on Nickelodeon’s Rugrats. Cavanaugh played the character for 135-plus episodes until 2002, when Nancy Cartwright took over. She also played Chuckie in The Rugrats Movie (1998).

During that time she continued working on TV, landing a regular voice role as Bunnie Rabbot in
See full article at Deadline »

Christine Cavanaugh, Voice of Rugrats’ Chuckie Finster, Dead at 51

Unfortunately, another talented performer has passed away in 2014. Christine Cavanaugh, who voiced Chuckie Finster on the Nickelodeon series Rugrats and Babe the pig from the 1995 film Babe, died at the age of 51 on Monday, Dec. 22. According to TMZ.com, at this time, “the details surrounding her death are unclear.” In addition to her work on Rugrats and in Babe, Cavanaugh provided the voice for Dexter in the Cartoon Network series Dexter’s Laboratory and also voiced roles in Disney’s Aladdin, The Critic, Recess, The Powerpuff Girls and The Wild Thornberrys. She retired from voice acting in 2001, and Nancy Cartwright, famous for voicing Bart Simpson on the long-running Fox animated series The Simpsons, was brought in to replace her as the voice of Chuckie on Rugrats. Although she was primarily a voice actress, Cavanaugh also guest starred on several different television series throughout her career. She appeared on The X-Files (photographed above), Cheers,
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Christine Cavanaugh, Voice of Chuckie from ‘Rugrats,’ ‘Babe,’ Dies at 51

Christine Cavanaugh, Voice of Chuckie from ‘Rugrats,’ ‘Babe,’ Dies at 51
Christine Cavanaugh, best known for her prolific vocal work — including memorable roles as the titular character in “Babe” and lovable scaredy-cat Chuckie Finster on Nickelodeon’s “Rugrats” — died on Dec. 22 of unknown causes. She was 51.

Cavanaugh broke into the business as an actress in 1988 after attending Utah State University and University of Hawaii. Her first prominent casting came in 1991 as Gosalyn Mallard on Disney’s animated series “Darkwing Duck.”

In addition to 1995’s “Babe” and her enduring role on “Rugrats” from 1991-2002, she also voiced Marty Sherman (“The Critic,” 1994-1995), Oblina (“Aaahh!!! Real Monsters,” 1994-1997) and maniacal child genius Dexter on Cartoon Network’s “Dexter’s Laboratory” from 1996-2003. She also made live-action guest appearances on shows including “ER,” “The X-Files” and “Everybody Loves Raymond.”

Cavanaugh retired from her voice career in 2001 in order to be closer to her family.

She was the godmother to Isabel Torres. Cavanaugh is survived by her father,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Christine Cavanaugh, Voice of ‘Rugrats’ Character Chuckie, Dead at 51

Christine Cavanaugh, Voice of ‘Rugrats’ Character Chuckie, Dead at 51
Christine Cavanaugh, the woman behind the voice of Chuckie on “Rugrats” and the title character in the film “Babe,” has died. She was 51.

Cavanaugh died on Dec. 22, according to the La Times. The cause of death is unknown.

See photos: Hollywood’s Notable Deaths of 2014 (Photos)

Cavanaugh was best known as the voice of the pig in the 1995 film “Babe,” Gosalyn Mallard in “Darkwing Duck” and the original voices of Chuckie Finster in Nickelodeon’s “Rugrats,” and Dexter in Cartoon Network’s “Dexter Laboratory.”

Also Read: Nickolodeon to Release ‘iCarly’ Movie

She could also be heard on “The Critic” as the voice of Marty,
See full article at The Wrap »

Christine Cavanaugh, Voice of Rugrats' Chuckie, Dead at 51

Christine Cavanaugh, Voice of Rugrats' Chuckie, Dead at 51
Christine Cavanaugh, an actress who voiced Rugrats‘ Chuckie and the title character in the film Babe, has died. She was 51.

Cavanaugh passed away on Dec. 22; the cause of death is unknown, TMZ.com reports.

She worked steadily throughout the 1990s and early 2000s, lending her voice to television series including The Critic, Darkwing Duck and Dexter’s Laboratory.

Cavanaugh also appeared in guest roles on The X-Files, Cheers and ER, among others.

Per an obituary in the Los Angeles Times, Cavanaugh retired from acting in 2001.

Related storiesRatings: Mike & Molly Tops Quiet Night, Charlie Brown Hits a 6-Year HighOutlander Season 2: A De-Thrones'd King,
See full article at TVLine.com »

Christine Cavanaugh Dead -- Legendary Cartoon Voice Dies ... 'Rugrats,' 'Dexter's Lab,' Babe'

  • TMZ
Christine Cavanaugh -- the original voice of "Babe" the pig and Dexter from "Dexter's Laboratory" -- has died at the age of 51. Cavanaugh passed away on December 22nd ... the details surrounding her death are unclear. Christine's work is legendary ... providing the voice of countless iconic cartoon characters including Chuckie the red-headed baby from "Rugrats."She also voiced characters from "Darkwing Duck," "Aladdin," "The Critic," "The Powerpuff Girls" and "The Wild Thornberrys."Cavanaugh retired from
See full article at TMZ »
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