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Chicago Hope (TV Series 1994–2000) Poster

(1994–2000)

Trivia

Featured the first use of the word "shit" in an American network TV broadcast (other than documentaries). Spoken by 'Mark Harmon' in an appropriate context. Very little negative publicity resulted.
The first television show to be shown in HDTV in the USA.
Mandy Patinkin portrayed his character Dr. Geiger in crossover appearances in both Homicide: Life on the Street (1993) and Picket Fences (1992).
In Chicago Hope: Cutting Edges (1995), the series quietly broke a major network TV taboo by showing the uncensored breasts of a teenage girl after her character undergoes successful reconstructive surgery. The scene, conducted with no fanfare and in good taste, attracted little controversy.
Premiered on a Thursday in the US, the same night as ER (1994). "Hope" was trounced in the ratings and moved to another night. Actors Noah Wyle and Peter Berg appeared on each others shows in an uncredited or voice-over roles. In one storyline, "Hope" did a commercial that looked exactly like the opening credits to "ER."
There are a lot of references throughout the series to St. Elsewhere (1982) another popular hospital-themed drama. Kate Austin wins the "Left Anterior Descending Aorta" award for being a top notch cardiac surgeon. Stephen Furst appeared playing a vet named Elliot. On St. Elsewhere he played Elliot Axelrod whose father was a vet (he did not appear as his actual St. Elsewhere character though as Elliot Axelrod, he was killed off in St. Elsewhere). And Kate quotes her mentor to be "Dr. David Demidian." Mark Craig ('William Daniels' ) on St Elsewhere said that Demidian was his mentor as well.
During the show's run, Cadillac ran a series of ads for it's new mid-size sedan, imploring people to "...lease a Catera." Then, the announcer would ask, "Who *is* Lisa Catera, anyway?" Shortly thereafter, Stacy Edwards joined the cast...playing Dr. Lisa Catera (1997-1999)

See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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