8.0/10
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168 user 99 critic

Three Colors: Blue (1993)

Trois couleurs: Bleu (original title)
A woman struggles to find a way to live her life after the death of her husband and child.

Writers:

(scenario), (scenario) | 3 more credits »
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Popularity
4,950 ( 101)

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Nominated for 3 Golden Globes. Another 19 wins & 9 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Benoît Régent ...
Olivier (as Benoit Regent)
Florence Pernel ...
Sandrine
...
Lucille (as Charlotte Very)
Hélène Vincent ...
La journaliste (as Helene Vincent)
Philippe Volter ...
L'agent immobilier
Claude Duneton ...
Le médecin
...
Patrice (Mari de Julie)
...
La mère
Florence Vignon ...
La copiste
Daniel Martin ...
Le voisin du dessous
Jacek Ostaszewski ...
Le flutiste
Catherine Therouenne ...
La voisine
Yann Trégouët ...
Antoine (as Yann Tregouet)
Alain Ollivier ...
L'avocat

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Storyline

The first part of Kieslowski's trilogy on France's national motto: Liberty, Equality, and Fraternity. 'Blue' is the story of Julie who loses her husband, an acclaimed composer and her young daughter in a car accident. The film's theme of liberty is manifested in Julie's attempt to start life anew, free of personal commitments, belongings, grief or love. She intends to numb herself by withdrawing from the world and living completely independently, anonymously and in solitude in the Parisian metropolis. Despite her intentions, people from her former and present life intrude with their own needs. However, the reality created by the people who need and care about her, a surprising discovery and the music around which the film revolves heal Julie and draws her back to the land of the living. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for some sexuality | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Country:

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Language:

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Release Date:

8 September 1993 (France)  »

Also Known As:

Three Colors: Blue  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Eastmancolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Fade outs in this film, which are traditionally used in movies to represent time passing or to conclude a certain scene, instead bring the viewers back to the point in time which the fade out began. The occasional fade outs and fade ins to Julie's character are used to represent an extremely subjective point of view. According to director Kieslowski: "at a certain moment, time really does pass for Julie while at the same time, it stands still. Not only does her music come back to haunt her at a certain point, but time stands still for a moment." See more »

Goofs

The speech given at the funeral states Julie's daughter's age as 5, but the dates on the coffin (26/04/1985 - 07/09/1992) would make her 7 years old. See more »

Quotes

Julie Vignon: Why are you crying?
La servante: Because you're not.
See more »

Crazy Credits

The final credit says in French, "We thank Alfa Romeo who allowed the scene of the accident to the Alfa 164 whose dynamics are of course purely imaginary." See more »

Connections

Referenced in Amélie (2001) See more »

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User Reviews

A passage through dark water into light
15 December 2003 | by (USA) – See all my reviews

This movie is one of my favorites.

The disturbing topic of a woman who can't deal with the loss of her husband and child transforms into an essay on the impossibility of isolation. It is a quiet, personal movie that spends most of it's time with the main character played excellently by Juliette Binoche.

The color blue is very evident in the film,and a fade to a simple blue screen is used to show times of deep emotion. Although the characters are set in a specific time and place ( France just before the formation of the EU ) the focus on the personal journey of grief transcends the setting.

I like the way this film changes from a story about a death to an affirmation to life. I like the way that little things like mice in the apartment loom large in the thought of our main character, where as what others consider important such as finishing her husband's symphony seem very minor .

It feels like diving deep through cold dark water to finally swim toward the light. One passes through emotional turmoil to come out the other side. I found it a very satisfying.


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