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New to Streaming: ‘Colossal,’ ‘Stalker,’ ‘Suspiria,’ ‘Fallen Angels,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Cameraperson (Kirsten Johnson)

Kirsten Johnson brings us her memoirs by way of a videographic scrapbook. Bits and pieces of the numerous documentaries she’s shot in her years as a Dp have been woven together into a travelogue / ethnographic study / commentary on the nature of cinematic framing. What was an establishing shot in one doc becomes, here, a study of the vagaries of a camera operator’s job. Documentary
See full article at The Film Stage »

All of the Films Joining Filmstruck’s Criterion Channel This July

Each month, the fine folks at FilmStruck and the Criterion Collection spend countless hours crafting their channels to highlight the many different types of films that they have in their streaming library. This July will feature an exciting assortment of films, as noted below.

To sign up for a free two-week trial here.

Saturday, July 1 Changing Faces

What does a face tell us even when it’s disguised or disfigured? And what does it conceal? Guest curator Imogen Sara Smith, a critic and author of the book In Lonely Places: Film Noir Beyond the City, assembles a series of films that revolve around enigmatic faces transformed by masks, scars, and surgery, including Georges Franju’s Eyes Without a Face (1960) and Hiroshi Teshigahara’s The Face of Another (1966).

Tuesday, July 4 Tuesday’s Short + Feature: Premature* and Ten*

Come hitch a ride with Norwegian director Gunhild Enger and the late Iranian master
See full article at CriterionCast »

iQiyi’s Yang Xianghua reveals details of Netflix deal

  • ScreenDaily
Yang Xianghua talks Netflix cooperation and says Svod will become the dominant streaming model in China.

iQiyi chief Yang Xianghua revealed further details of the Chinese streaming giant’s licensing deal with Netflix at the Winston Baker Film Finance Forum at the on-going Shanghai International Film Festival (Siff).

Although there has been speculation that the cooperation is a wide-ranging pact, Yang said there is no difference with iQiyi’s licensing deals with the Us major studios. “Netflix was trying to find a unique approach in the Chinese market, but there has been no quick success for the company yet,” said Yang during his keynote.
See full article at ScreenDaily »

iQiyi’s Yang Xianghua reveals details of Netflix deal

  • ScreenDaily
Yang Xianghua talks Netflix cooperation and says Svod will become the dominant streaming model in China.

iQiyi chief Yang Xianghua revealed further details of the Chinese streaming giant’s licensing deal with Netflix at the Winston Baker Film Finance Forum at the on-going Shanghai International Film Festival (Siff).

Although there has been speculation that the cooperation is a wide-ranging pact, Yang said there is no difference with iQiyi’s licensing deals with the Us major studios. “Netflix was trying to find a unique approach in the Chinese market, but there has been no quick success for the company yet,” said Yang during his keynote.

“We contacted Netflix several years ago and informed them about the rules and regulations here in China…at first they didn’t understand the rules and tried to find alternative ways to enter the market. Last year, they changed their strategy because they finally understood. We started talking in November and by April
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Film Review: ‘See You Tomorrow’

Film Review: ‘See You Tomorrow’
Overkill feels like an understatement when it comes to “See You Tomorrow,” a star-spangled, chintz-tinseled dramedy co-written and produced by Wong Kar-wai, featuring Tony Leung Chiu-wai as a barman who moonlights as a love doctor. Though China’s Zhang Jiajia takes billing as writer-director, it’s impossible to miss Wong’s pet themes of nostalgia, unrequited love, and numerology scribbled all over the frame. And yet without the Hong Kong auteur’s usual sense of subtlety, this boozy mix of screechy characters, splashy visuals, and trite tales will likely leave audiences feeling the cinematic equivalent of a hangover.

Despite dramatically overtaking Matt Damon starrer “The Great Wall” when it first opened, the film has since leveled off at the local box office. In fact, together with Zhang Yimou’s monster blockbuster, it has provoked such a virulent backlash from bloggers and disappointed audiences in China that the state newspaper the
See full article at Variety - Film News »

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