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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000

1-20 of 30 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


Oscar Nominated Film Series: Munich - Director Spielberg's Most Satisfying Effort in Decades

3 May 2015 7:46 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'Munich' movie cover 'Munich' movie review: Steven Spielberg tackles political time-space continuum in wildly uneven but ultimately satisfying thriller Alternately intriguing and irritating, thought-provoking and banal, subtle and patronizing, the biggest surprise about Steven Spielberg's Munich is that it – however grudgingly – works. The film, which Spielberg himself has referred to as a "prayer for peace," follows five men contracted by the Israeli government to avenge the massacre of that country's athletes at the 1972 Olympic Games in Munich. Sizable chunks of this political thriller with a Message (capital "M") are simplistically written, clumsily acted, and handled with the director's notoriously heavy touch, but the old adage – blood begets blood – even if somewhat muddled, is too timely not to make an impact. Complex 'Munich' movie plot Based on George Jonas' 1984 book Vengeance: The True Story of an Israeli Counter-Terrorist Team, whose veracity has been questioned in some quarters, Munich begins as »

- Andre Soares

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What was the best year in film history? HitFix readers continue the debate

1 May 2015 6:36 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

HitFix's recent spate of "Best Year in Film History" pieces inevitably spurred some furious debate among our readers, with some making compelling arguments for years not included in our pieces (2007 and 1968 were particularly popular choices) and others openly expressing their bewilderment at the inclusion of others (let's just say 2012 took a beating). In the interest of giving voice to your comments, below we've rounded up a few of the most thoughtful, passionate, surprising and occasionally incendiary responses to our pieces, including my own (I advocated for The Year of Our Lynch 2001, which is obviously the best). Here we go... Superstar commenter "A History of Matt," making an argument for 1968: The Graduate. Bullit. The Odd Couple. The Lion in Winter. Planet of the Apes. The Thomas Crown Affair. Funny Girl. Rosemary's Baby. And of course, 2001, A Space Odyssey. And that's only a taste of the greatness of that year. "Lothar the Flatulant, »

- Chris Eggertsen

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'Nashville Recap': Juliette Gets Her Groove, Rayna Makes a Pricey Move

30 April 2015 10:43 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

This week on Nashville, there was seemingly no problem that neither money nor misogyny couldn't solve.

The episode opens with Rayna calling Deacon from her private jet, telling him that she's off to find a new distribution deal. What she's really up to is trying to convince Deacon's estranged sister, Beverly, to cough up a liver for her brother. Through a series of flashbacks we learn that Beverly and Deacon's singing partnership was derailed by Rayna coming into the picture and that Beverly's jealousy runs deep. We also learn that »

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Fatherland by Anne-Katrin Titze

29 April 2015 1:43 PM, PDT | eyeforfilm.co.uk | See recent eyeforfilm.co.uk news »

A Nazi Legacy: What Our Fathers Did screenwriter Philippe Sands with director David Evans Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

David Evans' riveting dive into the personal and historical past of three families is accompanied by private photographs and previously unseen home movies provided by two sons, Niklas Frank and Horst von Wächter, both born in the spring of 1939.

A Nazi Legacy: What Our Fathers Did had its world premiere at the Tribeca Film Festival and I met up with director David Evans and screenwriter Philippe Sands for a conversation at high noon. It led us to Leonardo Da Vinci's Lady With An Ermine, First Chief Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court, Luis Moreno Ocampo, Friedensreich Hundertwasser and Steven Spielberg's red in Schindler's List.

Human Rights lawyer and author Philippe Sands, who lost ancestors in the Holocaust, is at the centre of the documentary's extraordinary constellation. Going on 70 years after »

- Anne-Katrin Titze

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Is Man of Steel in colour a better Superman movie?

24 April 2015 6:08 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Superman fans were divided over Zack Snyder's Man of Steel. It seems you either loved Henry Cavill's turn as Clark Kent, or you very much didn't.

One of the (several) reasons some fans were not so fond of the film, was Snyder's Dark Knight school of making the film look very grainy and miserable. What would it look like if some classic Superman colours were added?

Clever editors at VideoLab have tweaked with the colours of the film to make it look much more bright, beautiful and in keeping with the original Superman comics and films.

"Turns out there was a beautiful Zack Snyder movie hiding underneath the bleak colouring," VideoLab said. "Would Man of Steel have been more successful at the box office if it wasn't coloured like Schindler's List?"

We're not expecting its sequel Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice to incorporate these findings, especially with »

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Is Man Of Steel Better In 'Color'?

23 April 2015 5:48 PM, PDT | ComicBookMovie.com | See recent ComicBookMovie news »

Can a different color pallette change your views on Man of Steel? The fine folks over at Video Lab are trying to find out.   From 300, to Watchmen to Man of Steel (and by the looks of it, Batman v Superman too) Snyder's film's have had a distinctive hue that tries to capture the mood and tension of the given scene.  While some applaud Snyder's visual sensibilities, others can't seem to look past how unnatural certain scenes look.  Take a look at the video below and decide which version you like best.       VideoLab attempts to turn back time and restore the natural color & brightness in shots from DC's Man of Steel. Turns out there was a beautiful Zack Snyder movie hiding underneath the bleak coloring. Would Man of Steel have been more successful at the box office if it wasn't colored like Schindler's List? What do you think? Production Note: We're »

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Remembering Sidney Lumet

1 April 2015 4:42 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

April 9th will mark the four year anniversary of director Sidney Lumet's passing, at age 86. Lumet was the first director I interviewed whose one-sheet posters hung on my wall as a kid. He was an idol, an icon, and an inspiration. I wasn't yet 30 in April 1997, when I met him at The Four Seasons Hotel in Beverly Hills for our interview at the press junket for "Night Falls On Manhattan," one of his solid, authentic urban dramas that blended crime, politics and personal revelations that became his signature.

Lumet immediately put any butterflies I had at ease. Diminutive, but with the infectious energy of a teenager, his was a disarming presence. He paid me a compliment on my sportcoat, saying that I looked a bit like the young Mickey Rourke (which I still don't see, but what the hell), then went on to regale me for an hour with »

- The Hollywood Interview.com

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Karen Gillan, Jessica Chastain and Daniel Radcliffe light up Empire Awards

30 March 2015 6:06 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Karen Gillan, Jessica Chastain and Daniel Radcliffe were a few of the Hollywood stars to grace the red carpet at the Empire Film Awards in London last night (March 29).

Interstellar, Imitation Game among major winners at Empire Awards 2015

Gillan, who arrived in a retro Louis Vuitton mini dress, picked up Best Female Newcomer for her roles in Guardians of the Galaxy and Oculus.

Chastain, who wore a monochrome floral floor-length gown, collected the Best Film gong for Interstellar along with the movie's director Christopher Nolan.

Nolan also won Best Director for the sci-fi drama.

Ralph Fiennes was honoured at the annual ceremony with a "legend" award presented by Schindler's List co-star Liam Neeson. Rosamund Pike was named Best Actress for her Oscar-nominated role in Gone Girl, but was sadly absent.

Other guests at the event included Man of Steel's Henry Cavill, Gemma Chan, Kit Harington, Doctor Who's Peter Capaldi and Hayley Atwell. »

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What movie, TV show or music did your parents ban from you as a kid?

25 March 2015 1:51 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Raunchy comedies. Scary movies. Songs with explicit lyrics. Space, the final frontier. When we're kids, we're frequently banned from checking out films, TV, music or other entertainment before we're "ready." Whatever that means. At HitFix, we discovered there's a range of what was banned in our households when we were children. Some folks like lucky-duck Gregory Ellwood had no bans at all. Some bans didn't hold. Some bans were so intense, they blanketed all corners of media. Below are some of our staffers sounding off on what wasn't allowed in their household. Share with us in the comments what stuff you couldn't watch or hear. Chris Eggertsen - "Married...With Children" "Married...With Children" was like the Devil in our house, and here's the kicker: I'm almost positive my mother never watched it before banning it. It was enough that a random Christian woman living halfway across the country whom »

- Katie Hasty, HitFix Staff

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Hard to believe: John Williams is not scoring Steven Spielberg's 'Bridge of Spies'

18 March 2015 12:39 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

For the first time in almost 30 years a Steven Spielberg film will not be scored by John Williams.  That was the sad news DreamWorks Studios tried to avoid making headlines with this morning with the announcement that Thomas Newman would compose the music for Spielberg's upcoming thriller "Bridge of Spies." According to a release from the studio through distributor Walt Disney Pictures, Williams work schedule "was interrupted and he was unavailable to score the film due to a minor health issue, now corrected."   The 83-year-old composer has enjoyed a remarkable career winning five Academy Awards including three Oscars for Spielberg films "E.T.," "Schindler's List" and "Jaws."  The duo most recently collaborated on 2013's "Lincoln" for which Williams also earned an Original Score nomination. Williams' last theatrical work was 2013's "The Book Thief" which was his 49th nomination. He has also won a remarkable 22 Grammy Awards. Williams is still expected to »

- Gregory Ellwood

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Spielberg's 'Bridge of Spies' Loses Composer John Williams

18 March 2015 11:04 AM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

DreamWorks Pictures'/Fox 2000 Pictures' upcoming dramatic thriller directed by three-time Academy Award&#174-winning director Steven Spielberg (Saving Private Ryan, Schindler's List) and starring two-time Academy Award winner Tom Hanks (Forrest Gump, Philadelphia), has been, as previously announced, titled Bridge of Spies. In addition, 12-time Oscar nominee Thomas Newman (The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel, Saving Mr. Banks) has been signed to score the film, as John Williams' schedule was interrupted and he was unavailable to score the film due to a minor health issue, now corrected.

A dramatic thriller set against the backdrop of a series of historic events, Bridge of Spies tells the story of James Donovan (Hanks), a Brooklyn lawyer who finds himself thrust into the center of the Cold War when the CIA sends him on the near-impossible task to negotiate the release of a captured American U-2 pilot. Screenwriters Matt Charman and Ethan Coen »

- MovieWeb

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Liam Neeson Will Stop Making Action Movies in 2 Years

12 March 2015 10:35 AM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Following the success of Taken in 2009, Liam Neeson carved out quite a niche for himself as an older action star. His career certainly careened down this path, with the iconic actor appearing in 9 more action-packed thrillers that includ The A-Team, The Next Three Days, Unknown, The Grey, Battleship, Taken 2, Non-Stop, A Walk Among the Tombstones and Taken 3. Now, on the eve of his latest 'geriaction' movie, as some have dubbed them, Liam Neeson has declared that he will stop making action movies in 2 years, if he is able to make it that far.

Good Morning America caught up with Liam Neeson to chat about this weekend's Run All Night, which may certainly leave some fans with a sense of deja vu, as it once again features the actor running with a gun as he sometimes screams into a cell phone. The 62 year-old confirms that his days as an action star are numbered though, »

- MovieWeb

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Liam Neeson Plans to Stop Making Action Films

12 March 2015 4:21 AM, PDT | WorstPreviews.com | See recent Worst Previews news »

After a long career, Liam Neeson transitioned from films like "Schindler's List" to become an action star. Now that the actor is 62 years old and is promoting his latest action film "Run All Knight," Neeson is being asked about whether he has given thought to step away from the action genre. "Maybe two more year if God spares me and I'm healthy," he told The Guardian. "But after that, I'll stop [the action] I think." Neeson recently ended the "Taken" trilogy and will soon appear in smaller roles in "Ted 2" and the "Entourage" movie, before boarding Martin Scorsese's "Silence." Meanwhile, "Run All Night" is set to hit theaters this Friday. »

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Oscar Winner Went All the Way from Wyler to Coppola in Film Career Spanning Half a Century

11 March 2015 2:18 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Teresa Wright and Matt Damon in 'The Rainmaker' Teresa Wright: From Marlon Brando to Matt Damon (See preceding post: "Teresa Wright vs. Samuel Goldwyn: Nasty Falling Out.") "I'd rather have luck than brains!" Teresa Wright was quoted as saying in the early 1950s. That's understandable, considering her post-Samuel Goldwyn choice of movie roles, some of which may have seemed promising on paper.[1] Wright was Marlon Brando's first Hollywood leading lady, but that didn't help her to bounce back following the very public spat with her former boss. After all, The Men was released before Elia Kazan's film version of A Streetcar Named Desire turned Brando into a major international star. Chances are that good film offers were scarce. After Wright's brief 1950 comeback, for the third time in less than a decade she would be gone from the big screen for more than a year. »

- Andre Soares

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Examining the Christopher Nolan backlash

23 February 2015 10:33 PM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Another Oscars season, and Christopher Nolan is overlooked again. With Interstellar getting a mixed reaction, we look at the Nolan backlash.

This article contains a spoiler for the ending of Interstellar.

In case you missed it, the Oscars were this past weekend and Birdman was the big winner. The Academy’s choice to award Alejandro González Iñárritu's fever dream was a genuine shock, with Boyhood the running favourite for many months. Nonetheless, some things never change, and in that vein it's certainly a non-surprise the Academy also hardly noticed the most ambitious blockbuster of 2014: the Christopher Nolan space epic, Interstellar. Indeed, I use the phrase "non-surprise", because how could it be a winner when it was only nominated for the bare minimum of five Oscars in technical categories that are reserved as consolation prizes?

This is by all means par for the course with a film that has »

- simonbrew

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'Birdman' cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki joins exclusive club with Oscar win

22 February 2015 7:29 PM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

By winning the Best Cinematography Oscar for a second year in a row, "Birdman" director of photography Emmanuel Lubezki has joined a truly elite club whose ranks haven't been breached in nearly two decades. Only four other cinematographers have won the prize in two consecutive years. The last time it happened was in 1994 and 1995, when John Toll won for Edward Zwick's "Legends of the Fall" and Mel Gibson's "Braveheart" respectively. Before that you have to go all the way back to the late '40s, when Winton Hoch won in 1948 (Victor Fleming's "Joan of Arc" with Ingrid Bergman) and 1949 (John Ford's western "She Wore a Yellow Ribbon"). Both victories came in the color category, as the Academy awarded prizes separately for black-and-white and color photography from 1939 to 1956. Leon Shamroy also won back-to-back color cinematography Oscars, for Henry King's 1944 Woodrow Wilson biopic "Wilson" and John M. Stahl »

- Kristopher Tapley

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Academy Awards 2015 Live-Blog

22 February 2015 5:23 PM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

It's a wonderful night for Oscar... Oscar Oscar... Who will win? Wrong host. Neil Patrick Harris is MCing Sunday (February 22) night's Academy Awards, which is coming down to a "Birdman"/"Boyhood" showdown for the big prize. Thanks to The Guilds, we're all expecting a "Birdman" victory, but could there be exciting upsets in store? Click through, follow along and join (or start) the conversation below... 8:25 p.m. Et. That's a lot of Red Carpet coverage. My favorite moment was Terrence Howard playing "American Idol" nerd with Ryan Seacrest. 8:28 p.m. Really, ABC? You don't need a critical citation to call "American Crime" "an extraordinary new drama"? Well, if you say so yourself! 8:30 p.m. Let's Go! 8:30 p.m. Neil Patrick Harris rises onto the stage like a fire-free phoenix. "Tonight we honor Hollywood's best and whitest," he says, helping people playing Oscars Bingo at home. 8:31 p. »

- Daniel Fienberg

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Black Author Discovers Her Grandfather Was Nazi Villain of Schindler's List

12 February 2015 1:15 PM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

In 2008, Jennifer Teege was strolling around a library in her native Germany for books on the depression she'd been struggling with when she spotted a cover photograph that looked strangely familiar: her biological mother. So began a shocking odyssey in which Teege would learn the painful truth: Her maternal grandfather was Amon Goeth, the infamous Nazi war criminal portrayed by Ralph Fiennes in Steven Spielberg's Oscar-winning film Schindler's List. Now Teege, a German-born black woman who was given up for adoption as a child, has chronicled her journey in a memoir due out in the United States in April »

- Michelle Tauber, @michelletauber

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Black Author Discovers Her Grandfather Was Nazi Villain of Schindler's List

12 February 2015 1:15 PM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

In 2008, Jennifer Teege was strolling around a library in her native Germany for books on the depression she'd been struggling with when she spotted a cover photograph that looked strangely familiar: her biological mother. So began a shocking odyssey in which Teege would learn the painful truth: Her maternal grandfather was Amon Goeth, the infamous Nazi war criminal portrayed by Ralph Fiennes in Steven Spielberg's Oscar-winning film Schindler's List. Now Teege, a German-born black woman who was given up for adoption as a child, has chronicled her journey in a memoir due out in the United States in April »

- Michelle Tauber, @michelletauber

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Cinematographers pick the best-shot films of all time

4 February 2015 12:31 PM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

Stumbling across that list of best-edited films yesterday had me assuming that there might be other nuggets like that out there, and sure enough, there is American Cinematographer's poll of the American Society of Cinematographers membership for the best-shot films ever, which I do recall hearing about at the time. But they did things a little differently. Basically, in 1998, cinematographers were asked for their top picks in two eras: films from 1894-1949 (or the dawn of cinema through the classic era), and then 1950-1997, for a top 50 in each case. Then they followed up 10 years later with another poll focused on the films between 1998 and 2008. Unlike the editors' list, though, ties run absolutely rampant here and allow for way more than 50 films in each era to be cited. I'd love to see what these lists would look like combined, however. I imagine "Citizen Kane," which was on top of the 1894-1949 list, »

- Kristopher Tapley

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