6.9/10
130
7 user 7 critic

Road Scholar (1993)

PG | | Documentary | 16 July 1993 (USA)
Andrei Cordescu, NPR journalist, Romanian immigrant, naturalized American citizen, and newly-licensed driver, sets out on a cross- country road trip. He travels from-sea-to-shining-sea in a... See full summary »

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2 wins & 1 nomination. See more awards »
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Andrei Cordescu, NPR journalist, Romanian immigrant, naturalized American citizen, and newly-licensed driver, sets out on a cross- country road trip. He travels from-sea-to-shining-sea in a red 1968 Cadillac ragtop, exploring the meaning of freedom to a variety of Americans in this gently comic, yet poignant, documentary. Highlights include stops in New York, Camden, Detroit, Chicago, Taos, Arizona, Las Vegas, and San Francisco. Written by Tad Dibbern <DIBBERN_D@a1.mscf.upenn.edu>

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independent film | See All (1) »

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Documentary

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Rated PG for diverse thematic elements
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16 July 1993 (USA)  »

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Gross USA:

$594,768
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User Reviews

 
A warm appreciation from an outsider
22 March 2009 | by See all my reviews

This is an excellent film, filled with Andrei's dry, ironic wit and pointed observations. As the synopsis states, Andrei Codrescu, a Romanian poet who has never driven a car, takes lessons in order to get behind the wheel of a big red American car for a cross-country journey to find the soul of America.

Andrei is indeed an immigrant, and he is eager to let the audience know that his birth country was a hard place in which to grow up, but this is not a problem in the film (unless you don't like immigrants, I imagine.) It's his viewpoint AS an immigrant that gives the film its shape; indeed, if he'd been an American by birth, most of his witticisms would come off very different. His dryness and ironic tone are an acquired taste, but really, it's one that's easily acquired. For example, here's one of his bon mots: "Tourists are terrorists with cameras. Terrorists are tourists with guns." If that intrigues you, you'll love the movie.

He interviews hippies, religious communalists, New Age practitioners, Native Americans, inner city artists, famous poets - all kinds of people, all of them connected by the thread of spirituality and the inner drive to grow. The result is funny, sweet, and ultimately a valentine to his adopted land.


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