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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005 | 2003

13 items from 2017


‘Okja’ Star Tilda Swinton on How Ivanka Trump Inspired Her Role as ‘Daughter of a Different Dubious Dynasty’

16 May 2017 3:41 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

This story about Tilda Swinton first appeared in the Cannes issue of TheWrap Magazine. Like David Bowie and precious few others, she barely seems of this world. Tilda Swinton, an actress, artist, model and provocateur of Anglo-Scots descent but otherworldly mien, seems to be a visitor from a more rarefied and infinitely more interesting realm. She’s severe but open-hearted, impossibly striking, unbound by style or gender — it’s not for nothing that her breakthrough role came in “Orlando,” where she played a young nobleman who becomes a woman halfway through the film and announces, “no difference at all,” or that. »

- Steve Pond

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Sally Potter’s “The Party” Gets U.S. Distribution

12 May 2017 12:01 PM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

The Party

Three months after making its world premiere at the Berlinale, “The Party” has found a U.S. home. Writer-director Sally Potter’s latest feature has been acquired by Roadside Attractions, The Hollywood Reporter writes. Patricia Clarkson toplines the dark comedy.

Set in contemporary London, the black and white film centers on a celebration that goes horribly awry. “The Party” was shot in just 14 days and features a star-studded cast including Emily Mortimer (“Doll & Em”), Cherry Jones (“Transparent”), Kristin Scott Thomas (“The English Patient”), Cillian Murphy (“The Dark Knight Rises”), Bruno Ganz (“Downfall”), and Timothy Spall (“Denial”).

Sally Potter’s ‘The Party’ may be one of the most witty, outrageous, biting, and entertaining movies that we have ever acquired,” said Roadside Attractions co-founders Howard Cohen and Eric d’Arbeloff. “It has an outstanding cast who take enormous pleasure sparring on screen, physically and verbally. We loved the film from start to bloody finish.”

The film was very warmly received at the Berlinale, and currently boasts a 100 percent “Fresh” rating at Rotten Tomatoes. “The Party” secured UK distribution earlier this month.

Potter is perhaps best known for her Oscar-nominated 1992 adaptation of Virginia Woolf’s “Orlando,” starring Tilda Swinton. She most recently directed the Elle Fanning-starrer “Ginger & Rosa,” a 2012 coming-of-age drama set during the Cuban Missile Crisis. Potter’s other credits include “The Tango Lesson,” “Yes,” and “The Man Who Cried.”

The former choreographer left school when she was 16 years old. “I’d made my first 8mm film at 14 and I absolutely, passionately wanted to be a film director. So I left school and struck out,” she has explained. “I got jobs in restaurants, washing carrots, and joined the London Filmmaker’s Co-op, making tiny, tiny films that just got bigger. Looking back, I think ‘Jesus, living alone, wanting to be a film director’… When I meet 16-year-olds, they’re so young, the little darlings.”

Unfortunately we’re going to have to wait a while to watch “The Party.” Roadside Attractions is planning a North American release for February 2018.

Sally Potter’s “The Party” Gets U.S. Distribution was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Laura Berger

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Sally Potter’s “The Party” Gets UK Distribution

2 May 2017 9:01 AM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

The Party

Sally Potter’s latest film has secured distribution in the UK. ScreenDaily reports that “The Party” has been acquired by Picturehouse Entertainment, with a planned fall release. The star-studded dark comedy made its world premiere in competition at the Berlinale back in February.

Set in contemporary London, the black and white film centers on a celebration that goes horribly awry. “The Party” was shot in just 14 days. Its cast includes Patricia Clarkson (“Learning to Drive”), Emily Mortimer (“Doll & Em”), Cherry Jones (“Transparent”), Kristin Scott Thomas (“The English Patient”), Cillian Murphy (“The Dark Knight Rises”), Bruno Ganz (“Downfall”), and Timothy Spall (“Denial”).

The pic was produced by Potter’s production company with Christopher Sheppard, Adventure Pictures. Kurban Kassam (“20,000 Days on Earth”) also served as producer.

“I am thrilled to be working with Sally Potter on her wonderful new film. Over a long career, Sally has consistently led the charge in UK independent filmmaking, bringing us a body of films that are at once sharp, fun, and surprising,” commented Clare Binns, director of programming and acquisition at Picturehouse.

Potter is perhaps best known for her 1992 adaptation of Virginia Woolf’s “Orlando,” starring Tilda Swinton. The film received two Oscar nominations. She most recently directed “Ginger & Rosa,” a 2012 coming-of-age drama set during the Cuban Missile Crisis. The film centers on the intense friendship between two teen girls, played by Elle Fanning (“Maleficent”) and Alice Englert (“Beautiful Creatures”). Potter’s other notable films include the BAFTA-nominated “The Tango Lesson,” “Yes” with Joan Allen, “The Man Who Cried,” starring Christina Ricci and Cate Blanchett, and “Rage” with Judi Dench.

We’re still waiting for “The Party” to get picked up in the U.S. The film was very warmly received at the Berlinale, and currently boasts a 100 percent “Fresh” rating at Rotten Tomatoes. With a cast this strong and great reviews, hopefully it’s only a matter of time before a U.S. distributor snags the film.

Sally Potter’s “The Party” Gets UK Distribution was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Laura Berger

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Ed Catto: It’s a Small World, After All

3 April 2017 5:00 AM, PDT | Comicmix.com | See recent Comicmix news »

I like crowds. I like big noisy events. State fairs? Love ‘em. Black Friday shopping days? I’m there. Live music with tiny crowded dance floors? Sounds good to me. San Diego Comic Con? Yeah, baby. Ditto The New York Comic Con.

But on the other hand, when I’m thinking about Geek Culture and comic conventions, I find that I also enjoy small comic conventions. There’s a certain charm, an aura of creativity and a sense of community that embraces you in a unique way that you won’t find at NYC’s Javits Center.

I had to cancel out of this past weekend’s WonderCon in Anaheim, California. That was a drag as I was looking forward to being a panelist on Rik Offenberger’s Marketing/PR panel. But I haven’t been on a convention hiatus; lately, I have been busy finding and attending them. For consecutive weekends, »

- Ed Catto

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The Berlin International Film Festival and the European Film Market, Part 2

28 February 2017 7:09 AM, PST | Sydney's Buzz | See recent Sydney's Buzz news »

As the film-business-crowds move through meetings designed to meet all sorts of movie-related objectives in this vast mix of people, and the movie-going public lines up for films in the Competition, Out-of-Competition, Panorama, Forum and Retrospectives; and families attend the Generation series, some for kindergarteners and others for preteens and some for those 14 and up, and as the constant exchange of ideas continues, there is lots of buzz, mostly positive about the Hungarian Competition film “On Body and Soul”.“On Body and Soul” by Ildikó Enyedi

Buzz continues the next day both pro and con about Oren Moverman’s Competition film, “The Dinner” which is definitely a must-see for each to decide on one’s own response to it. As Scott Roxborough in The Hollywood Reporter says, it “looks like just the political dish the times demand.” Produced by Caldecot Chubb, the script was originally to be written by Moverman for Cate Blanchett to direct. »

- Sydney Levine

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Tilda Swinton is the bookies fave for Doctor Who role

16 February 2017 9:25 AM, PST | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Tilda Swinton is the favourite to take the role of Doctor Who on television once Peter Capaldi bails out later in the year. Apparently there has been a big bet placed in the last 48 hours which has propelled the Doctor Strange and Orlando actress to the top of the list.

The odds now stand at 7/2 for Swinton to take the role. She was previously at 10-1. The new odds position the actress ahead of previous favourite Kris Marshall, who is still 4-1 to replace Capaldi. Olivia Colman is 5-1 and Maxine Peake is 8-1.

Capaldi will complete the current series, which is now shooting and depart the BBC show after this year’s Christmas special, which will air on Christmas Day.

The post Tilda Swinton is the bookies fave for Doctor Who role appeared first on The Hollywood News. »

- Paul Heath

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Berlinale 2017 Review: The Party, Drawing Room Satire at its Finest

15 February 2017 9:00 AM, PST | Screen Anarchy | See recent Screen Anarchy news »

Sally Potter is not normally known for comedy; her most famous film, Orlando (which put Tilda Swinton on the map) certainly has its comedic moments, but her work (such as The Tango Lesson and Yes) tend to more serious examinations of what my colleague Sophie Mayer calls the politics of love. In her latest film The Party, however, she turns her astute eye in a most hilarious way to this politics of love (and the love of politics). Part biting satire, part drawing room farce, its frenetic vision of the most disastrous celebratory dinner is a masterpiece, and a timely commentary on recent political events and the said politics of human emotion. Janet (Kristen Scott Thomas) has just been appointed Shadow Minister of Health in the UK Parliament, fulfilling...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...] »

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Berlin Review: Patricia Clarkson Gets Fierce in Sally Potter’s Uproarious, Stagey ‘The Party’

13 February 2017 11:04 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Liberalism will eat itself! At least according to The Party, that is, and we’re not just speaking figuratively. Indeed, at one point in Sally Potter’s new film — a riotous, if undeniably stagey black-and-white mid-length feature — a central character (played by Kristen Scott Thomas) decides, however subconsciously, to chew her own arm instead of sensibly taking out her anger on her unfaithful husband. “But I don’t believe in revenge,” she cries out. You can tell even she is having a hard time believing it. This poor soul — the main host of the titular gathering – – has just learned that her husband, Bill (Timothy Spall), is not only dying of cancer, but has chosen to live out his remaining days with the younger woman with whom he has been having an affair for the previous two years.

The character’s name is Janet and the party is intended to be a celebration for her, »

- Rory O'Connor

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‘The Party’ Review: Sally Potter’s Farce Is Undercooked — Berlinale 2017

13 February 2017 10:30 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

A tepid farce that that combines the brevity of a one-act play with the lo-fi desperation of a student film, “The Party” is the kind of star-studded misfire that might only have made sense in the context of an artistic movement like Dogme 95, whose strict dictums could have explained its experimental zeal and excused its fundamental shabbiness. Of course, such formal recklessness is par for the course when it comes to the cinema of Sally Potter, a British dynamo whose work ranges from a radical adaptation of Virgina Woolf’s “Orlando” to an erotic Joan Allen drama that’s spoken entirely in iambic pentameter. But if the dazzling eccentricities of Potter’s previous films might help to prepare viewers for her latest trick, their intellectual rigor casts this new one in a strange and unflattering light. It’s different, yes, and made with conviction. But it also feels flimsy, hollow, »

- David Ehrlich

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‘A Fantastic Woman’ Review: Sebastían Lelio’s Trans Drama Is A Grippingly Humane Tale Of Grief — Berlinale 2017

13 February 2017 6:59 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Sebastián Lelio’s “A Fantastic Woman” settles into a defiantly grounded drama about a trans woman fighting through her grief, but it starts with some incredible sleight of hand.

Set at the height of a Santiago summer, the film begins with a man named Orlando (“The Club” actor Francisco Reyes) as he gets a massage at his local sauna. Fifty-seven years old and looking like a gentler Jeremy Irons, Orlando leaves the health club and steps into the tired Chilean sun, eventually making his way to a nearby nightclub. He locks eyes with the singer onstage as soon as he steps inside, and she returns his attention with interest. Her name is Marina (first-time actress Daniela Vega), she’s roughly half Orlando’s age, and she’s very much in love with him. The feeling is mutual.

Later that night, the two of them have sex against the floor-to-ceiling window »

- David Ehrlich

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Berlin Film Review: ‘A Fantastic Woman’

12 February 2017 1:30 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Multiple mirrors abound in frame after frame of “A Fantastic Woman,” repeatedly reflecting the woman of the title — young, beautiful, headstrong Marina — in all her, well, fantastic glory. It may seem an obvious, even clichéd, visual trope for the resourceful Chilean director Sebastián Lelio to fall back on, until it dawns on us that its very obviousness is precisely the point: We’re given every conceivable opportunity to see and perceive Marina for exactly who she is. So why do so many of those around her struggle to do the same? In this exquisitely compassionate portrait of a trans woman whose mourning for a lost lover is obstructed at every turn by individual and institutional prejudice, Lelio has crafted perhaps the most resonant and empathetic screen testament to the everyday obstacles of transgender existence since Kimberly Peirce’s “Boys Don’t Cry” in 1999. Mingled with a wily, anxious streak of noir styling, »

- Guy Lodge

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Berlin: How Sally Potter Created Claustrophobia for Her Ensemble in 'The Party'

10 February 2017 10:00 PM, PST | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Most famous for a film featuring a plot spanning several centuries (1992’s Tilda Swinton breakout Orlando), British director Sally Potter has gone in the opposite direction for her latest feature — her first since 2012’s Ginger & Rosa.

The Party, which has its world premiere in Berlin, sees an enviable ensemble cast (Timothy Spall, Kristin Scott Thomas, Emily Mortimer, Cillian Murphy, Patricia Clarkson, Bruno Ganz and Cherry Jones) on the guest list for an intimate gathering of highbrow friends in a London house and has a story that unravels, unexpectedly and violently, in real time over the course of just »

- Alex Ritman

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Top 100 Most Anticipated Foreign Films of 2017: # 41. Sally Potter’s The Party

5 January 2017 12:45 PM, PST | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

The Party

Director: Sally Potter

Writer: Sally Potter

British filmmaker shot to prominence in 1992 with her sophomore feature, an exquisite adaptation of Virginia Woolf’s genderbending novel Orlando, which starred Tilda Swinton and Quentin Crisp.

Continue reading »

- Nicholas Bell

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005 | 2003

13 items from 2017


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