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Kieran Culkin and Mae Whitman Spar In Woody Allen-Inspired Short ‘Approaching a Breakthrough’ — Watch

  • Indiewire
He may not have made a good movie since “Blue Jasmine,” but Woody Allen’s influence still reaches far and wide. Whether it’s the charming self-deprecation of Greta Gerwig’s “Frances Ha,” Ingrid Jungermann’s update on “Manhattan Murder Mystery” with the soon-to-be-released “Women Who Kill,” or the whimsical surrealism of “Approaching a Breakthrough,” a new short film from writer/director Noah Pritzker.

Read More: Meet the 2015 SXSW Filmmakers #12: Noah Pritzker’s ‘Quitters’ Sees a Family Falling Apart

Tightly scripted and engagingly shot, Pritzker’s short is indelibly of its time while tipping its hat to cinema’s past. Kieran Culkin plays Norman, a young man running away from his debt as well as indecision. The film begins with a nuanced argument between Norman and his girlfriend Claire (Mae Whitman) about the struggle for autonomy in romantic relationships.

As their bickering devolves, Norman is suddenly approached by his two former therapists,
See full article at Indiewire »

5 Lessons For Actresses from Diane Keaton’s AFI Lifetime Achievement Award Tribute

5 Lessons For Actresses from Diane Keaton’s AFI Lifetime Achievement Award Tribute
When Diane Keaton accepted the 45th AFI Life Achievement Award from Woody Allen in Hollywood Thursday night, it was the end of one of the more memorable AFI tributes. And as one actress after another explained why Keaton was such a significant role model — from Oscar-winners Emma Stone, Reese Witherspoon (Keaton-directed TV movie “Wildflower”) and Meryl Streep (“Marvin’s Room”) to Rachel McAdams (“The Family Stone”) and comedienne Lisa Kudrow (“Hanging Up”) — it struck me that all actresses should pay attention to why Keaton is so admired and emulated.

Here are some wise lessons to be learned from the star of “Play It Again Sam,” “The First Wives Club,” “Crimes of the Heart,” “Shoot the Moon,” and HBO’s “The Young Pope.”

1. Stay single.

Keaton launched her Hollywood career with the day-long wedding scene in “The Godfather,” at the end of which she and fellow theater outsider Al Pacino proceeded to get royally drunk.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

5 Lessons For Actresses from Diane Keaton’s AFI Lifetime Achievement Award Tribute

  • Indiewire
5 Lessons For Actresses from Diane Keaton’s AFI Lifetime Achievement Award Tribute
When Diane Keaton accepted the 45th AFI Life Achievement Award from Woody Allen in Hollywood Thursday night, it was the end of one of the more memorable AFI tributes. And as one actress after another explained why Keaton was such a significant role model — from Oscar-winners Emma Stone, Reese Witherspoon (Keaton-directed TV movie “Wildflower”) and Meryl Streep (“Marvin’s Room”) to Rachel McAdams (“The Family Stone”) and comedienne Lisa Kudrow (“Hanging Up”) — it struck me that all actresses should pay attention to why Keaton is so admired and emulated.

Here are some wise lessons to be learned from the star of “Play It Again Sam,” “The First Wives Club,” “Crimes of the Heart,” “Shoot the Moon,” and HBO’s “The Young Pope.”

1. Stay single.

Keaton launched her Hollywood career with the day-long wedding scene in “The Godfather,” at the end of which she and fellow theater outsider Al Pacino proceeded to get royally drunk.
See full article at Indiewire »

Tribeca Winner ‘Women Who Kill’ Lands at FilmRise, Film Collaborative (Exclusive)

Tribeca Winner ‘Women Who Kill’ Lands at FilmRise, Film Collaborative (Exclusive)
FilmRise has acquired worldwide VOD and digital rights to Ingrid Jungermann’s comedy-thriller “Women Who Kill,” which won the narrative feature screenplay award at the 2016 Tribeca Film Festival.

The non-profit Film Collaborative will release the film theatrically. The story centers on Morgan — a commitment phobic woman — and her ex-girlfriend who are locally famous true-crime podcasters and suspect Morgan’s new love interest is a murderer.

In addition to directing, Jungermann wrote the script and stars in the film alongside Annette O’Toole, Ann Carr, Sheila Vand, Sheila O’Neill and Deborah Rush. The film was produced by Alex Scharfman and Jungermann, and executive produced by Cliff Chenfeld, Craig Balsam, Jim Rosenthal, Rick Milenthal, Victor Zaraya, Stacie Passon, Jay Van Hoy and Lars Knudsen. Lauren Brady was a co-producer on the film.

Dennis Harvey gave the film a strong review for Variety: “A shaggy, banter-driven quasi-thriller in the mode of ‘Manhattan Murder Mystery
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Diane Keaton’s AFI Life Achievement Tribute Set for Airing on TNT, TCM

Diane Keaton’s AFI Life Achievement Tribute Set for Airing on TNT, TCM
TNT has set a June 15 airdate for the 45th AFI Life Achievement Award Tribute to Diane Keaton.

Keaton will be presented the award on June 8 at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood. TNT will televise the celebration a week later as a one-hour special airing at 10 p.m.

Sister network Turner Classic Movies will then encore the special on July 31, during a night of programming dedicated to Keaton’s work. This marks the fifth year the AFI special has aired on Turner networks.

TCM’s July 31 tribute to Keaton will include Warren Beatty’s 1981 drama “Reds” and Woody Allen’s 1993 comedy “Manhattan Murder Mystery.”

The AFI announced in October that it had selected Keaton for the honor. Keaton’s achievements include winning best actress for Allen’s “Annie Hall” and was nominated for best actress at the Academy Awards for “Marvin’s Room,” “Reds,” and “Something’s Gotta Give.”

Her comedy career includes collaborations with Allen in “Play
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Diane Keaton’s AFI Life Achievement Tribute Set for Airing on TNT, TCM

Diane Keaton’s AFI Life Achievement Tribute Set for Airing on TNT, TCM
TNT has set a June 15 airdate for the 45th AFI Life Achievement Award Tribute to Diane Keaton.

Keaton will be presented the award on June 8 at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood. TNT will televise the celebration a week later as a one-hour special airing at 10 p.m.

Sister network Turner Classic Movies will then encore the special on July 31, during a night of programming dedicated to Keaton’s work. This marks the fifth year the AFI special has aired on Turner networks.

TCM’s July 31 tribute to Keaton will include Warren Beatty’s 1981 drama “Reds” and Woody Allen’s 1993 comedy “Manhattan Murder Mystery.”

Related

Diane Keaton, Jane Fonda, Candice Bergen Join Indie Comedy ‘Book Club

The AFI announced in October that it had selected Keaton for the honor. Keaton’s achievements include winning best actress for Allen’s “Annie Hall” and was nominated for best actress at the Academy Awards for “Marvin’s Room,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Newswire: R.I.P. Frank Pellegrino, Sopranos actor and restaurateur

  • The AV Club
As reported by Variety, Sopranos actor and New York City restaurateur Frank Pellegrino has died after a battle with lung cancer. He was 72.

Pellegrino is probably best known for playing FBI Chief Frank Cubitoso on eleven episodes of The Sopranos, and like a lot of Italian actors from New York, he spent a lot of time appearing in mobster-related films and TV shows. In addition to The Sopranos, he played Johnny Dio in Goodfellas, appeared in three episodes across the Law & Order universe, and he had smaller roles in Cop Land, Mickey Blue Eyes, and Manhattan Murder Mystery. As Variety notes, he also had a recent guest appearance on Bravo’s Odd Mom Out.

Separate from his acting life, Pellegrino was a food buff and co-owner of iconic Italian eatery Rao’s in East Harlem, New York—a restaurant that has appeared in Jay Z videos, The Wolf ...
See full article at The AV Club »

‘Sopranos’ and ‘Goodfellas’ Actor Frank Pellegrino Dies at 72

‘Sopranos’ and ‘Goodfellas’ Actor Frank Pellegrino Dies at 72
Frank Pellegrino, known as FBI chief Frank Cubitoso on HBO’s “The Sopranos” and a New York City restaurateur, has died following a battle with lung cancer. He was 72.

One of Pellegrino’s first acting roles, in what would become a career of appearances in gangster-related cinema, came in 1990 as Johnny Dio in “Goodfellas.” His character on “The Sopranos” ran for eleven episodes during which he attempted to uncover dirt to help in the Soprano/Dimeo case. Pellegrino also appeared in several episodes of “Law & Order.” His other credits include “Cop Land,” “Mickey Blue Eyes,” “Manhattan Murder Mystery” and, most recently, a guest spot on the TV series “Odd Mom Out” in 2015.

Outside of acting, Pellegrino also co-owned the restaurant Rao’s in East Harlem, New York City. The Italian spot has hosted many celebrities including Jay Z and Martin Scorsese, and appears in many films including “The Wolf of Wall Street” The mainstay was founded in
See full article at Variety - TV News »

NewFest And Beyond: Why Lgbt Film Festivals Are Essential to the Future of Gay Movies

  • Indiewire
Barry Jenkins’ “Moonlight” is garnering awards buzz and praise from the industry’s most respected critics, but if that film came out 10 years ago, the gay coming-of-age story could have counted on a more specific foundation: The Lgbt film festival circuit. San Francisco’s Frameline, Los Angeles’ Outfest, and New York’s NewFest were once the go-to market for queer filmmakers and films, but once they break out, many directors with enough clout can easily graduate to a bigger arena.

Lgbt filmmakers rarely face the stigma that once limited opportunities, but for the emerging and mid-career filmmaker, as well as foreign filmmakers looking to break into international markets, queer film festivals remain a vital opportunity to get their work in front of an often adoring audience. At a time when gay identity has yet to truly permeate Hollywood filmmaking, that support system is more vital than ever.

Read More: Outfest
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Keeping Up with the Joneses’ Review: Zach Galifianakis and Jon Hamm’s Spy Bromance Is Predictable Fun

  • Indiewire
‘Keeping Up with the Joneses’ Review: Zach Galifianakis and Jon Hamm’s Spy Bromance Is Predictable Fun
The most surprising thing about “Keeping Up with the Joneses” isn’t that it’s actually funny, but that some touching unlikely friendships emerge amidst the outrageous action sequences. Jeff Gaffney (Zach Galifianakis) is a lovably dull suburban husband, who dotes on his wife, Karen (Isla Fisher), and enjoys a simple life in his beloved cul-de-sac. With the kids off at summer camp, the Gaffneys have time on their hands to wring their hands over the mysterious new couple that moves into the neighborhood, making an all-cash offer on the house across the street.

Tim and Natalie Jones (Jon Hamm and Gal Gadot) are gorgeous, worldly and very much in love. Naturally, everyone in the cul-de-sac hates them. Except affable Jeff, who quickly develops a “man-crush” on Tim (in the words of the movie). But Natalie’s perfect potluck dishes and Tim’s glass-blowing hobby are not fooling Karen, whose
See full article at Indiewire »

Diane Keaton to Receive AFI Life Achievement Award

Diane Keaton to Receive AFI Life Achievement Award
Oscar-winning actress Diane Keaton will be honored by the American Film Institute with its 45th Life Achievement Award. The organization’s highest honor for a career in film is set to be awarded at a gala tribute on June 8 in Los Angeles.

Diane Keaton is one of the most beloved leading ladies of American film,” said Howard Stringer, chair of the AFI Board of Trustees. “Peerless in her mastery of both comedy and drama, she has won the world’s heart time and again by creating characters of both great strength and vulnerability. Her career as a director and producer is even further evidence of her passion for the art form and her seemingly boundless talents.”

The tribute special will return to television on TNT for its fifth year, to be followed by an encore presentation on TCM.

Over five decades on screen, Keaton’s achievements include winning best actress
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Film Review: ‘Women Who Kill’

Film Review: ‘Women Who Kill’
A shaggy, banter-driven quasi-thriller in the mode of “Manhattan Murder Mystery” (or the “Thin Man” movies, for that matter), “Women Who Kill” offers a drolly amusing, lightly macabre variation on the standard lesbian romantic comedy. Ingrid Jungermann’s feature debut as writer-director-star deploys a lot of improv talent for this Brooklyn-set tale of two ex-lovers who host the titular morbidly-themed podcast, and find their insular social circle suddenly invaded by a possible genuine compulsive murderess. Nimbly sustaining the kind of off-kilter, anecdotal humor Jungermann test-drove in several prior shorts and two web series, “Women Who Kill” seems likely to break out of the gay festival-and-niche-home-release ghetto to score some limited arthouse exposure.

Debating topics such as “Who’s the hottest female serial killer” like NPR commentators discussing favorite recycling methods, Park Slope denizens Morgan (Jungermann) and Jean (Ann Carr) continue to spend nearly all their time together, even though they
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Woody Allen: A Career in 20 Hilarious, Brilliant Lines

Woody Allen: A Career in 20 Hilarious, Brilliant Lines
This Friday, Café Society, the latest release from writer/director/comic godhead Woody Allen, waltzes into theaters — the 47th feature Allen has directed over a career spanning 50 years. (Yes, we're counting New York Stories.) He's had box-office successes and outright bombs, Oscar-winning masterpieces and critically panned duds. But regardless of his movies' receptions (and the reoccurring rumors about his personal life), he's managed to pump out a film a year with impressive regularity. Some key elements have stayed the same — once a jazz clarinet slinks onto the soundtrack, audiences know exactly who they're dealing with.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Woody Allen: A Career in 20 Hilarious, Brilliant Lines

Woody Allen: A Career in 20 Hilarious, Brilliant Lines
This Friday, Café Society, the latest release from writer/director/comic godhead Woody Allen, waltzes into theaters — the 47th feature Allen has directed over a career spanning 50 years. (Yes, we're counting New York Stories.) He's had box-office successes and outright bombs, Oscar-winning masterpieces and critically panned duds. But regardless of his movies' receptions (and the reoccurring rumors about his personal life), he's managed to pump out a film a year with impressive regularity. Some key elements have stayed the same — once a jazz clarinet slinks onto the soundtrack, audiences know exactly who they're dealing with.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

The weird, white cast of Woody Allen's new Amazon series just got weirder and whiter

  • Hitfix
The weird, white cast of Woody Allen's new Amazon series just got weirder and whiter
The cast of Woody Allen's upcoming six-episode Amazon series just got bigger. According to Entertainment Weekly, Rebecca Schull, Margaret Ladd, David Harbour, Christine EbersoleMichael Rapaport, and, somewhat surprisingly, Joy Behar and Lewis Black will appear in Allen's mysterious show, the title and plot of which have yet to be announced. They'll join previously announced Elaine May, Rachel Brosnahan, John Magaro, and, very surprisingly, Miley Cyrus. In a world where Olivia Wilde, at 28, was deemed "too old" to play Leonardo DiCaprio's wife, it's nice to see some older actresses (Schull is 87, May is 83, and Ladd and Behar are 73) get work, and some of these casting choices are, on their face, intriguingly unconventional -- Behar, for instance, is best known these days for her hosting work (though she's also done a good bit of acting work, including in Allen's Manhattan Murder Mystery), while Miley Cyrus is Miley Cyrus (Hannah
See full article at Hitfix »

Irrational Man and Vive Le Discount Movie House!

Early on in Irrational Man, Woody Allen’s latest half-narcotized attempt to dramatically grapple with a philosophically tinged moral crisis, a fellow academic tells Abe Lucas (Joaquin Phoenix), “I loved your essay on situational ethics.” Abe, being a newly appointed professor/radical free thinker to the philosophy department of a picturesque Rhode Island college and himself awash in career disillusionment and an existential dilemma involving writer’s block, smiles and nods appreciatively and noncommittally. However, the audience may consider the Big Theme bell well and truly rung. Allen, who would never be so satisfied with a single easy proclamation of achievement, pads the first half of the movie with apparently awe-inspired compliments from fellow professors, administrators and students directed toward Abe’s prodigious intellect—his reputation doth well precede him, and he knows it. And you can bet that every classroom scene will be occasion to name-drop the heavy hitters-- Kant!
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

StreamFix: 10 great movies on Netflix that I'm sick of hearing you talk about

  • Hitfix
StreamFix: 10 great movies on Netflix that I'm sick of hearing you talk about
"Annie Hall" "Annie Hall" is a definitive comic gem from 1977, a watershed romantic comedy that gave great roles to Diane Keaton, Carol Kane, and even Paul Simon. And you better not bring it up around me, because I will be livid. Can't you talk about "Manhattan Murder Mystery" or something? You realize Anjelica Huston plays a poker expert in that, right? "Harold and Maude" Damn, I love Ruth Gordon. One of the top five Oscar speeches of all time, for sure. Bud Cort? What a wonderful performance he gives. What a strange, enigmatic, weird, funnyish movie. Sigh. Too bad if you bring it up one more time like it makes you a sensitive, deep man who can appreciate peculiar whimsicality, I'm going to tie up and torture your improv instructor.  "Breakfast at Tiffany's" Unless you're voicing a conspiracy theory that Harper Lee wrote all of Truman Capote's best work,
See full article at Hitfix »

Brooklyn Hipsters Become Amateur Sleuths In Wild Canaries Trailer

The new trailer for the indie, hipster, screwball mystery Wild Canaries proclaims it “a love letter to old screwball comedies.” To me it looks a lot like Woody Allen’s early 90s screwball mystery Manhattan Murder Mystery, only this time with Brooklyn hipsters instead of married Manhattanites. Not that that’s a bad thing: Wild Canaries seems to be all that it claims, and more.

The story centers around Noah and Barri (Lawrence Michael Levine and Sophia Takal), whose elderly neighbor Sylvia dies a total un-mysterious death. Barri suspects foul play, though, and does some snooping of her own with the help of her roommate Jean (Alia Shawkat). This involves breaking into people’s apartments and apparently stalking the suspected murderer, all with Noah tagging along, objecting strenuously. As the pair dive deeper and deeper into the investigation, things come to light about the people in their building that they never really wanted to know.
See full article at We Got This Covered »

The fantasist: The comic art of Woody Allen

Everyone knows Woody Allen. At least, everyone thinks they know Woody Allen. His plumage is easily identifiable: horn-rimmed glasses, baggy suit, wispy hair, kvetching demeanor, ironic sense of humor, acute fear of death. As is his habitat: New York City, though recently he has flown as far afield as London, Barcelona, and Paris. His likes are well known: Bergman, Dostoevsky, New Orleans jazz. So too his dislikes: spiders, cars, nature, Wagner records, the entire city of Los Angeles. Whether or not these traits represent the true Allen, who’s to say? It is impossible to tell, with Allen, where cinema ends and life begins, an obfuscation he readily encourages. In the late nineteen-seventies, disillusioned with the comedic success he’d found making such films as Sleeper (1973), Love and Death (1975), and Annie Hall (1977), he turned for darker territory with Stardust Memories (1980), a film in which, none too surprisingly, he plays a
See full article at The Moving Arts Journal »
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