Mad Dog and Glory
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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2007 | 2005

6 items from 2014


Sony In Talks To Adapt Richard Price’s The Whites

25 August 2014 5:56 AM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Over the years, American novelist and screenwriter Richard Price has seen many of his works make smooth transitions from the page to the screen. His book The Wanderers was adapted by Philip Kaufman into a now-iconic coming-of-age film, and Spike Lee’s take on Clockers earned strong reviews. Additionally, Price’s work as a screenwriter has been highly successful – among his accolades are an Oscar nomination for Best Adapted Screenplay (for The Color of Money) and a Writers Guild of America Award (for HBO’s The Wire, on which he served as a writer). Now, Sony is betting on Price’s ability to deliver another strong drama by entering talks to adapt his upcoming work The Whites.

If a deal is made, super-producer Scott Rudin (Captain Phillips) will produce a film adaptation of the crime drama, the first written by Price under the pen name Harry Brandt. Set in New York City, »

- Isaac Feldberg

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‘Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer’ Director Returns to Horror Genre

21 August 2014 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Nearly 25 years have passed since John McNaughton’s landmark true-crime horror film “Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer” snuck into U.S. theaters — and that itself was long after its 1986 festival premiere, a protracted tussle with the MPAA accounting for the delay.

Filmmaking would never be an easy ride for the Chicago-based director. Half a dozen narrative features (offbeat comedy “Mad Dog and Glory” and erotic thriller “Wild Things” among them) followed before he retreated from bigscreen work in 2001. Sporadic TV assignments followed — including a 2006 chapter for Showtime’s “Masters of Horror” series, which placed him in the company of John Carpenter and Takashi Miike, among others.

See Also: Film Review – “The Harvest

And it’s to the horror genre that he returns with his comeback feature “The Harvest,” which McNaughton will present Aug. 23 at FrightFest in London. Starring Samantha Morton as the dangerously overprotective mother of a teenage shut-in, »

- Guy Lodge

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The Three Stages of Bill Murray's Brilliantly Bittersweet Career

26 June 2014 11:00 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

Bill Murray became a movie star 35 years ago this week, upon the release of "Meatballs" on June 29, 1979. His lead role as the head counselor at a sub-par summer camp marked a number of firsts: his first of four movies with director Ivan Reitman (the others were "Stripes" and the two "Ghostbusters"), his first of six movies with writer Harold Ramis (the four Reitman films, plus "Caddyshack" and "Groundhog Day"), and his first taste of mega-stardom beyond his TV fame on "Saturday Night Live."

Since then, his career has taken on a trajectory unique in the history of film, one in which he's gone from comic goofball to dramatic thespian, from universally beloved to acquired taste, and from manic cynic to soft-spoken spiritual seeker. Through it all, however, there have been a few constants; no matter whether he's a grubby groundskeeper or a morose mogul: Murray's character is always the coolest »

- Gary Susman

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See Our ‘Wooly Willy’ Game With Bill Murray: Wooly Billy

26 February 2014 12:41 PM, PST | Vulture | See recent Vulture news »

Bill Murray isn't a chameleon-like actor. He has a few pretty identifiable archetypes: the wiseass, the nutcase, the late-career vaguely depressed searcher. But though they may have behavioral similarities, you can instantly distinguish them by their hair: Life Aquatic's Steve Zissou (that beard!), Rushmore's Herman Blume (that 'stache!), The Royal Tenenbaums' Raleigh St. Clair (both of 'em!), or M. Ivan in Wes Anderson's upcoming The Grand Budapest Hotel (oh my god!). You could practically draw them from memory! He lends himself to a new version of the classic activity board Wooly Willy, where you took a bald man and gave him a new do with metal shavings and a magnet. Meet: Wooly Billy. We started you off with four classic looks. Want to draw in his disheveled What About Bob? near-mullet? His badass slicked-back Mad Dog and Glory do? Or vintage 1970s Murray? Print out the blank »

- Marisa Woocher

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Bill Murray Facts: 21 Things You (Probably) Don't Know About the 'Monuments Men' Star

7 February 2014 3:00 AM, PST | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

Is there anything Bill Murray hasn't done? And I'm not talking just movies.

A man of seemingly legendary stature, the actor broke out on "Saturday Night Live" in the late '70s and only grew more prominent with unforgettable roles in "Caddyshack" (1980) and "Ghostbusters" (1984). Since then, Murray has also established himself in dramatic roles, such as in the acclaimed Sofia Coppola movie "Lost in Translation," which garnered him a Best Actor nomination.

Whether or not you've seen Murray on the big screen or at the ballpark, there's still much to know about the star. From his duet with Clint Eastwood to his unbelievable encounters with fans, here are 21 things you probably don't know about Bill Murray.

1. Murray is a part-owner of three minor league baseball teams, including the Riverdogs in Charleston, South Carolina. and the Brockton Rox in Massachusetts, which explains this.

2. Murray admits to signing on for the "Garfield »

- Jonny Black

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Sundance 2014: Bill Hader can count on Kristen Wiig in 'The Skeleton Twins' -- Exclusive Photo

14 January 2014 9:00 AM, PST | EW - Inside Movies | See recent EW.com - Inside Movies news »

Kristen Wiig and Bill Hader spent seven years together on Saturday Night Live, so when you hear they’re starring in a movie together — playing twins no less — you might expect it to be an outrageous comedy. When you then hear it’s also a Sundance movie, you might conclude that it’s something quirky-funny like Adventureland, the 2009 festival hit in which they played the married couple that runs a rinky-dink amusement park. But The Skeleton Twins is something entirely different — a full-on drama. They play Maggie and Milo, twins who used to be close but now live on different sides of the country. »

- Jeff Labrecque

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2007 | 2005

6 items from 2014


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